About Title

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium has kept a listing of the participants in the Fellowship, Traineeship and Internship programs since 1990. Click on the semester name for the complete listing of participants from that time period. For any inquiries, please contact hsgc@spacegrant.hawaii.edu.

Former Fellows and Trainees title.

Present - 2010

Summer 2019
Summer 2019 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2018
Summer 2018 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Summer of 2018 to interns at the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at Kauaʻi Community College.

Summer 2018 Undergraduate Fellowships

Logo of Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory.Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory—HSFL Trainees:

Michelle Masutani was a summer intern at Teledyne Brown Engineering, at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, supporting the Secondary Payloads Integration and Evolution Office. Her main task was a survey of commercial off-the-shelf secondary payload deployers for the Space Launch System. Michelle also learned about model-based systems engineering for information exchange between developers and was introduced to Teledyne's payload-operations support of the International Space Station.

Collin Takasaki was a summer intern at Teledyne Brown Engineering, at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, supporting the development of autonomous operations in deep space. His main task was writing code for an autonomous fluid transfer system.

Kaua‘i Community College:

Sara Morimoto, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will be working alongside Melia Okura on the Software Defined Radio (SDR), a radio communication system that utilizes SDR peripherals such as RTL-SDR dongles or the HackRF One in order to implement hardware components (mixers, filters, amplifiers, etc.) in software on PCs or embedded systems.

Melia Okura, a freshman in Computer Science, will be working alongside on projects involving Software Defined Radio (SDR) and the capture and analysis of Radio Frequency (RF) signals.

Summer 2017
Summer 2017 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Summer of 2017 to interns at the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at Kauaʻi Community College.

Summer 2017 Undergraduate Fellowships

Kaua‘i Community College:

John Acoba, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, is working on the project titled “Change Detection Techniques for Astrophotography Using a Raspberry Pi 3” with mentor Neil Young of the Department of Electronics. It involves a program that will find space anomalies such as comets and meteors within multiple Astro-images. A Change Detection technique must be implemented to find shooting stars and remove other unnecessary objects

James Thesken, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the project titled “UAV Applications in Precision Agriculture”.

Melia Okura, a freshman in Computer Science, will be working alongside Lilia Tau’a and Sara Morimoto on projects involving Software Defined Radio (SDR) and the capture and analysis of Radio Frequency (RF) signals. SDR is a radio communication system that utilizes SDR peripherals such as RTL-SDR dongles or the HackRF One in order to implement hardware components (mixers, filters, amplifiers, etc.) in software on PCs or embedded systems.

Summer 2016
Summer 2016 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded an undergraduate internship in the Summer of 2016 to a student at the California Institute of Technology.

Summer 2016 Undergraduate Fellowships

California Institute of Technology

Caleb Bishop, an Electrical Engineering student, is working on “Keck Database Query Improvements”, with mentor Mitchell Troy, a technical group supervisor at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involves work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory related to the W. M. Keck Observatory telescopes on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Caleb was responsible for improving the speed of data retrieval by redesigning and rewriting the MATLAB code.

Summer 2015
Summer 2015 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded an undergraduate fellowship in the Summer of 2015 to a student at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. An undergraduate internship was awarded to a student at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Summer 2015 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jacob Matutino, a senior in Computer Science, with mentor Neil Young of the Department of Electronics, will work on a project, creating the“General Dynamics Server Troubleshooting Bash Script”. Jacob will be working on a script that will automate server troubleshooting. “The idea is for the client to run one script and get a file with all of the data on the server. The Client will then  send General Dynamics that file where it will be analyzed to see if there are any problems in the configurations in the server.”

Hilo sealUniversity of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Christina Cauley, a senior in Geology and Anthropology, will work on a project covering "Digital Imagery and Geologic Map of Chegem Caldera, Russia." Using geospatial software for image processing and mapping, Christina will be registering and re-projecting old geologic field maps onto accurate topographic maps based on Space Shuttle–Digital Elevation Model data. She will also use the collected field data and new remote sensing data to improve the accuracy of the geologic details. Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology is serving as a mentor.

Summer 2014
Summer 2014 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2013
Summer 2013 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2012
Summer 2012 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2011
Summer 2011 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2010
Summer 2010 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2020
Spring 2020 Undergraduate Participants

 

Spring 2020 Fellows

Jason Borgida

Jason Borgida

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jason Borgida, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Eunji Jun of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a numerical study of chemical reactions and gas dynamics. Jason’s project, “Chemical Models for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo for Mars Hypersonic Entry Flows” has applications for understanding the chemical reactions inside the bow shock of spacecraft entering the atmosphere of Mars for future lander missions.

Kayli Chun

Kayli Chun

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kayli Chun, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the project, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Ceramic Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotube Nanoforest I and Preceramic Polymers Prepregged Composites for Space Applications.” With mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kayli is researching ways to optimize strength and toughness of nanocomposite materials for improved mechanical performance, especially to avoid delamination during use in space.

Schelin Ireland

Schelin Ireland

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Schelin Ireland, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Paul Lucey of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project looking at craters on the Moon using orbital remote sensing data to ultimately estimate regolith thickness. Schelin is using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment onboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in her project “Thickness of the Lunar Highlands Regolith and Implications for the Impact Flux in the Early Solar System.”

Mikhail Polivany

Mikhail Polivany

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Mikhail Polivany, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on an ongoing nanotechnology project. Mikhail is developing and evaluating the mechanical qualities of 3-D nanocomposite materials with interlaminar conductive fillers in his project titled, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotubes Nanoforest II and Prepreg-composite for Space Applications.”

Elizabeth Swantek

Elizabeth Swantek

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Elizabeth Swantek, a sophomore in Mathematics, is working on a coordinated project with HSGC URI student Alan Tong to improve data analysis from drone surveys over ecologically important field sites. With mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics, Elizabeth is working on real-time, on-board capabilities for image analysis as well as programming for visualizing remote sensing data in an immersive, virtual reality environment in her project “Augmented Autonomy for Drones.”

Eric Takahashi

Eric Takahashi

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Eric Takahashi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Eunji Jun of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a numerical study of green-fuel chemistry and gas-plume dynamics for small satellites. Eric’s project, “Aerothermal Analysis of an Atmospheric Dipper CubeSat with Green Propellant” supports NASA’s studies of propulsive systems for optimal performance.

Alan Tong

Alan Tong

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Alan Tong, a sophomore in Mathematics, is working on a coordinated project with HSGC URI student Elizabeth Swantek to improve data analysis from drone surveys over ecologically important field sites. Alan aims to apply topology (shape and structure in data) and spectral graph theory to the development of fast algorithms for mathematical clustering of remote sensing data, which can be used ultimately for automatic detection of a desired quality, such as tree health. Alan’s project, with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics, is titled “Development of Topological Data Analysis for On-board UAS Analysis.”

Spring 2020 Trainees

Hunter Patton

Hunter Patton

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Hunter Patton, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Joseph Brown of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a laboratory project, “The Actuation of the Meissner Effect in an Induced Electromagnetic Field.” Hunter is interested in experimenting with controlling the Meissner Effect while considering its possible use to activate motion of objects in space.

Tyler Bagnall

Tyler Bagnall

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Tyler Bagnall, a Senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with Dr. Mehrdad Nejhad of the Department of Engineering on a project to develop Continuous Fiber Ceramic Nanocomposites with the inclusion of Nanoforest I and nano-particles in a preceramic polymer to develop low-weight, low-cost, high-performance ceramic nanocomposites for the design and manufacturing of a 12U CubeSat Housing Structure.

Spring 2019
Spring 2019 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2019 Fellows

Reginald Tolentino

Reginald Tolentino

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Reginald Tolentino, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on the use of nanocomposite building materials for improvements in mechanical and physical properties of space structures. Reginald’s project is titled, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Ceramic Nanocomposites from Preceramic Polymers and Nanomaterials for Space Applications.”

Nicholas Takamatsu

Nicholas Takamatsu

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Nicholas Takamatsu, a junior in Astrophysics, is researching galaxy evolution in the project, “Emission Line Diagnostics of NGC 660’s Active Galactic Nucleus” with mentor Dr. Andreea Petric of the UH Institute for Astronomy at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT). Nicholas is using CFHT-SITELLE data to better understand star formation rates in the polar ring galaxy NGC 660 by investigating relative intensities of gas emission lines, gas ionization states and metalicity.

Gabriella Sanchez

Gabriella Sanchez

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Gabriella Sanchez, a senior in Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Andreea Petric of the UH Institute for Astronomy at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) on the active galactic nucleus outburst of polar ring galaxy NGC 660. Using data from the CFHT-SITELLE instrument and Python programming, Gabriella is investigating the motions and energetics of ionized gas in NGC 660 in her project, “Gas Kinematics of Growing Supermassive Black Holes in Merging Galaxies.”

Adrian Ramirez

Adrian Ramirez

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Adrian Ramirez, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the project, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotube Nanoforests for Space Applications.” With mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering Adrian is testing and evaluating the thermomechanical properties of 3-D nano-size composite materials with and without interlaminar carbon nanotube nanoforests.

Joel Pederson

Joel Pederson

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Joel Pederson, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “Development of a Dynamic Stimulator for Nadir Sensor Testing” with mentors Mr. Yosef Ben Gershom and Dr. Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Joel’s work to design, build, and test a motorized system supports the Lab’s development of robust procedures to test and verify a CubeSat satellite’s nadir sensor functionality for Earth observations and planetary space missions.

Emma Hon

Emma Hon

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Emma Hon, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentors Dr. Shuai Li and Dr. Jeff Taylor of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on an ARCGIS-based lunar mapping project to identify valuable resources for exploration and supporting future long-term human presence in space. Emma will map water content, iron, and titanium using orbital remote sensing data in her project, “Mapping Potential Lunar Resources in the Aristarchus Plateau.”

Samuel Dobry

Samuel Dobry

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Samuel Dobry, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “A Modular Mass Adjusting Platform for 6U CubeSat ADCS Verification” with Yosef Ben Gershom and Dr. Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Samuel’s design work and prototyping of the testbed assembly supports greater modularity for 3U to 6U CubeSat designs and testing Attitude Determination and Control System components for orbital remote sensing missions.

Rachel Bellah

Rachel Bellah

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Rachel Bellah, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Przemyslaw Dera of the Department of Earth Sciences on “Testing Thermal-reflective Paint Pigments on Metal and Mars Soil Simulant Chips with Implications for use in Moon to Mars Structures.” Using temperature-step experiments to test reflectivity and durability, Rachel will assess the suitability of thermal-reflective paints for cost-effective passive cooling of space structures.

Spring 2019 Trainees

Jennifer Bragg

Jennifer Bragg

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Jennifer Bragg, a junior in Mathematics and Physics, is working with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the UH Institute for Astronomy on astronomical data processing. Jennifer will gain experience with new data from the Gaia space observatory of the European Space Agency in her project, “Distance and Formation of the Cometary Globule CG 12.”

Schelin Ireland

Schelin Ireland

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Schelin Ireland, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working on the project, “Raman Spectroscopy for Mars 2020” with mentors Dr. Paul Lucey and Ms. Macey Sandford of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Schelin will learn experimental procedures of Raman spectroscopy for detecting biogenic material using a laboratory version of the SuperCam remote-sensing instrument on NASA’s Mars 2020 rover mission.

Spring 2019 UH Community Colleges Trainees

Kapi’olani Community College

Kapi’olani Community College

Kenny Kiriu is working with Dr. Radovan Minlincic to study a fundamental interaction of physics in his project, “Design of a Galileo-style Apparatus for the Most Precise Measurement of the Gravitational Constant, G.” Kenny will learn experimental procedures required for achieving high-precision measurements with consistent accuracy.

Kiyomi Sanders is working with Dr. Radovan Milincic on a “Survey of the Density Profiles of Galaxies Around Suppermasive Black Holes.” Kiyomi will gain experience with using data from NASA’s High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center, as she compares densities of galaxies as a function of distance from the black hole.”

Windward Community College

Windward Community College

Kat Bronston, Rhon Turalde, Michael Andrew’s Lauren Grzegorczyk, Eric Takahashi, Matthew Nakamura, Adam Macalalag, “Vehicle Design for NASA Student Launch Project.”

Project IMUA Trainees

Project IMUA Trainees

Honolulu Community College: Knyte Bennett – Jeremiah, Mia Fong, Craig Opie, Adrianna Saymo, Nelson Encarnacion, Cody Feliciano, Bradley May, Jonathan York, “NASA Student Launch Project: Deployable Rover.”

Windward Community College: Kat Bronston, Rhon Turalde, Michael Andrews, Lauren Grzegorczyk, Eric Takahashi, Matthew Nakamura, Adam Macalalag, “Vehicle Design for NASA Student Launch Project.”

 

CanSat Trainees

CanSat Trainees

Kapi’olani Community College:

Daniel Laugenberg, Zachary Wadas, Gavin Yamanaka, Cas Ghotane, “Utilizig an Autogyro Descent – Controlled Miniature Satellite to collect Real- Time Atmospheric Data.”

Spring 2018
Spring 2018 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2018 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses.

Spring 2018 Fellows

Dylan Morris-Fogel

Dylan Morris-Fogel

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Dylan Morrison-Fogel, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the “Optimization of Orbital Transfer Trajectories and Low Thrust Maneuvers,” applicable to small satellites. With mentor Dr. Dilmurat Azimov of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dylan will generate numerical solutions and run simulations in an effort to validate the maneuvers, such as orbital transfers and rendezvous and docking, that achieve the most efficient results.

Christopher Nguyen

Christopher Nguyen

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Christopher Nguyen, a senior in Information and Computer Sciences, is working with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Planetary Science Institute on big data in “Processing of Lunar Temperature Data using Cloud Computing.” Utilizing lunar temperature data from the Diviner instrument on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Christopher aims to calculate the time-average of a temperature-dependent quantity to find potential sublimation rates in support of NASA’s efforts to more accurately map the cold traps of ice on the Moon.

Kenji Emerson

Kenji Emerson

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Kenji Emerson, a sophomore Physics and Astronomy double major, is “Studying Chemical-Composition Evolution of the Circumgalactic Gas” with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Using stacking analysis on Sloan Digital Sky Survey data of absorption-line spectra of triply ionized carbon and other species in the gas surrounding galaxies, Kenji aims to study the effects and evolution of metal abundances in the large-scale gaseous structure of the universe.

Theodore Pruyne

Theodore Pruyne

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Theodore Pruyne, a senior Physics and Astronomy double major, is working with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on hyperspectral data from the Canada-France-Hawai‘i Telescope on Maunakea as part of a large study of star formation and chemical enrichment in nearby spiral galaxies. Theodore is mapping nebular emission lines and studying gas kinematics in his project, “Nebular Physics in the Late-type Galaxy NGC 6822.”

Kyle Steckler

Kyle Steckler

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kyle Steckler, a junior Physics and Astronomy double major, is “Investigating Distant Galaxies with ISIRIS on Keck” using near-infrared spectra obtained from the W.M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea. With mentor Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kyle’s work with telescope adaptive optics and abundances, star formation rates, and evolution of distant galaxies.

Tino Wells

Tino Wells

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Tino Wells, a junior Physics and Astronomy double major, is working on a “Non-parametric Clustering Analysis” of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tino is using statistical methods on stacked absorption-line systems of multiple ion species in an effort to classify gaseous structures in the cosmos and relate them to galaxy types.

Spring 2018 Trainees

Mark Achenbach

Mark Achenbach

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Mark Achenbach, a senior in Astrophysics, is working on a high energy physics project, developing algorithms to determine fast-neutron particle energy spectra and momentum distributions. With mentor, Dr. Sven Vahsen of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mark’s project is titled “Directional Neutron Spectroscopy via Detection of 3D Nuclear Recoils.”

Emma Hon

Emma Hon

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Emma Hon, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics, is working on “Space Resource Identification and Utilization” with mentor Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Using microscopy and imaging to identify the mineralogy and composition of meteorite and lunar samples, Emma is creating a database of materials as potential space-based natural resources and commodities.

Jennifer Kim

Jennifer Kim

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jennifer Kim, a senior in Civil Engineering, is working on a nanophysics and materials science project with mentor Dr. Klaus Sattler of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Jennifer is synthesizing and characterizing foam in her project “Studies of Molecular Storage in Carbon Nanofoam, a Promising Superlight Material for NASA Space Missions.”

Lee Danielle Young

Lee Danielle Young

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lee Danielle Young, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “CubeSat Structure Development” with mentor Lance Yoneshige of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Lee Danielle’s work supports the Lab’s efforts in gaining greater modularity and flexibility in 6U CubeSat–small satellite structural designs for Earth observation and planetary space missions.

Spring 2017
Spring 2017 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2017 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo, and the University of Guam. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at UH Mānoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Spring 2017 Fellows

Yosef Ben Gershom

Yosef Ben Gershom, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Departmetn of Mechanical Engineering on a project to study possible improvements for spacecraft thermal control. This project, in collaboration with Fellow Brialyn Onodera, builds upon work by previous Space Grant Fellows. Yosef’s project involves simulating body forces experienced by spacecraft and satellites to study the “Effects of Body Forces on Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Microchannels Through Dynamic Testing.”

Marielle Dela Cruz

Marielle Dela Cruz

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Marielle Dela Cruz, a senior in Astrophysics is working on “Analyzing Cometary Dust Trails using Finson-Probstein Modeling.” Her mentor is Dr. Karen Meech of the Institute for Astronomy. Marielle is using dust-dynamical modeling distributions, and dust emission velocities, which are relevant to making predictions of the compositions of the volatile materials in comets.

Kaimi Kahikikolo

Kaimi Kahikikolo

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kaimi Kahikikolo, a sophomore Astrophysics and Mathematics double major, is working with mentor Dr. Geoffrey Mathews of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project titled, “Thieving Stars Caught by Kepler: A Search for Intermittent Accretors in Kepler Binary Systems.” Kaimi is using data from the 2.0m Faulkes telescope on Haleakala to study three binary star systems. This work supports efforts to better understand mechanisms of Type Ia supernovae and the theory of dark energy accelerating the expansion of the universe.

 

Jeffrey Kleyner

Jeffrey Kleyner

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jeffrey Kleyner, a senior in Physics and Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Geoffrey Mathews of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project modeling star ages in young stellar associations. Utilizing data from ESA’s Gaia satellite and new coding solutions, Jeffrey’s project, “Ages of Stars in Upper Scorpius Through Kinematic Motion,” supports NASA’s efforts to better understand the evolution of stars and their protoplanetary disks.

 

 

Zachary Langdalen

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Zachary Langdalen, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working on “Dispersal of Volcanic Ash on Mars: Ash Particle Shape Analysis” with meteor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Using Terrestrial as as Martian analogues, Zachary’s detailed 3D microscopy of the ash dimensions and shapes will be sued in models of particle sedimentation in the Martian atmosphere.

Brialyn Onodera

Brialyn Onodera

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Brialyn Onodera, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the “Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Microchannels.” This study is in collaboration with Fellow Yosef Ben Gershom and builds on work by former Space Grant Fellows under the mentorship of Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Brialyn aims to improve the design and test the components of a prototype cooling loop for maximum efficiency.

 

 

Lean Teodoro

Lean Teodoro

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lean Teodoro, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Hope Ishii of the Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a laboratory project with interplanetary dust particles. Lean will be suing multiple, high -resolution microscopy methods to identify the particles and compile compositional data in her project, “Assessment of New Extraterrestrial Particle Collections at Mauna Loa Observatory.”

Jason Tremblay

Jason Tremblay

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jason Tremblay, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is researching the “Topographic Influences on Emplacement Dynamics of Lava Flows on Mars” with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Jason will work with multiple image and topographic datasets of Mars to create a GIS database of detailed flow dimensions and shapes that will be used in numerical models to understand how topography effects the flow and emplacement of lava across the surface.

Travis Thieme

Travis Thieme

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Travis Thieme, a senior Astronomy and Physics double major, is researching “Small-Scale Physical Properties of Nebulae in Nearby Disk Galaxies” with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Travis is using data from an imaging spectrometer at the 3.6-meter Canada-France- Hawai’i telescope on Maunakea to study emission lines to better understand massive star formation and chemical enrichment processes in spirals.

 

Allen Jake Aromin and John Tristan Palanca

Allen Jake Aromin and John Tristan Palanca

University of Guam

Allen Jake Aromin, a junior in Secondary Education, and John Tristan Palanca, a junior in Computer Science, are working with mentor Dr. Romina King of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences on a robotics project. Their “Design, Fabrication, and Programming of a Drilling System for Water Extraction from Subsurface Planetary Ice,” is inspired by NASA’s Mars Ice Challenge, a competition and demonstration project for improving in-situ resource utilization. Allen will concentrate on the fabrication and Tristan will concentrate on the programming, while both will be responsible for the robot’s electrical system, assembly, and testing on simulated Martian ice.

Spring 2017 Trainees

Cameron Asaoka

Cameron Asaoka

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Cameron Asaoka, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology to collect reflectance data on soils of different porosities in a project relevant to understanding the polar regions on the Moon. In his project, “Examining Why Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions Appear Dark in the Ultraviolet,” Cameron will gain experience with laboratory techniques and with reflectance data obtained from instruments on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

 

Daryl Albano

Daryl Albano

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Daryl Albano, a junior in Computer Science, is working with mentor John Hamilton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Daryl’s project “Development of a Computer Vision System for Autonomous Rover Navigation” is in support of the mining robot being constructed for a NASA competition at the Kennedy Space Center that fosters innovative robotic excavation concepts for future missions.

 

Callie Crowder

Callie Crowder

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Callie Crowder, a senior Astronomy and Physics double major, is working with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on project titled “Integration and Commissioning of the new UH Hilo Hoku Ke’a Observatory.” Callie is working on the integration of softwar and hardware components of the new 0.7- meter telescope that will be used for education and outreach.

Project Imua Honolulu Community College Trainees

Project Imua Honolulu Community College Trainees

Honolulu Community College

Honolulu Community College:

Onkar Nerurkar, Syrus Valdivia, Xiao Hau Li, “Monitoring Sub- orbital Flight with Onboard Cameras and Data Controller

Kapi’olani Community College Trainees

Kapi’olani Community College Trainees

Kapi'olani Community College

Kapi’olani Community College:

Jason Salseg and Matthan Mejia, “Toward the Design of an Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle for Subsea Exploration on Europa.”

Brian Swilley, “Survey of Elliptical Galaxies in the Vicinity of the Biggest Supermassive Black Holes using the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.”

 

Leeward Community College CanSat Trainees:

Leeward Community College CanSat Trainees:

Leeward Community College CanSat Trainees

Jeffrey Bareng, Holly Flores, Jason Marcos, Joseph McConnell, Alejandro Ruck Bega, Kainani Santos, “Team No Na Me’e.”

Windward Community College Trainees

Windward Community College Trainees

Windward Community College: 
Tiana Barber, “Identifying and Measuring Geological Features on Mars Photographed by Curiosity near the Bagnold Dunes.”

 

 

Spring 2016
Spring 2016 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2016 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at UH Mānoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Spring 2016 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Aleca Borsuk, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Kent Kobayashi of the Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences on a project titled "Spatial Optimization of Artificial Lighting for Space Grown Amaranthus Caudatus." Aleca is researching the effects of different artificial lighting schemes on crop yield in a controlled laboratory setting as it relates to optimal horticultural practices for growing food for astronauts during long duration missions.

Ryan Hendrix, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will be working on an operational prototype of a planetary rover-mounted X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument with mentor Dr. Przemyslaw Dera of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. In his project, titled "Development of Terra-Hybrid: A New Generation of X-ray Diffraction Instrument for Mineralogy Research in Planetary Exploration," Ryan is helping to optimize the instrument and sample platforms, and collect XRD data from meteorites.

Kaimi Kahihikolo, a freshman in Astrophysics and Mathematics, will be working with mentor Dr. Hsin-Yi Shis of the Gemini Observatory on a project titled "Impacts of Radio-jet-driven Outflows on Host Galaxy Evolution." Kaimi will analyze astronomical data collected on Maunakea of three young radio galaxies in an effort to determine how the local gas clouds interact with radio jets, the mass outflow rate from the host galaxy, and the heavy element abundance of the outflowing gas.

Lauren Mathews, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will work with mentor Dr. Craig Nelson of the Department of Oceanography on laboratory experiments to study the interacting effects of changes in water temperature and food nutrient-quality on zooplankton growth, survival, grazing rate, and stoichiometry over a whole life cycle. Lauren's project "Tropical Zooplankton Nutrition and Stoichiometry in Response to Temperature" is relevant to future modelling of oceanic carbon storage and carbon exchange among the ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Warren McKenzie, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will work on a project titled, "Lava Flow Behavior on the Southeastern Flank of Elysium Mons via a Graben Cross-section" with mentor Dr. Scott Rowland of the Department of Geology and Geophysics. Using high-resolution images, topographic data, and thermal emission data of Mars obtained from orbiting NASA spacecraft, Warren will map lava flows in an effort to better understand shield volcanism on Mars.

Kimberly Teehera, a junior in Biochemistry with previous fellowship experience in 2015 studying the geochemistry of lava tubes on Mauna Loa, will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy on a project titled "Microbial Habitats in High-Altitude Lava Tubes." Kimberly is using a variety of analysis techniques to identify microbes or biominerals from a collection of water and rock samples. Studies of terrestrial ice-filled lava tubes are relevant to the fields of astrobiology and climate of Mars.

Matthew Yee, a senior in Computer Engineering, will work with mentor Mr. Jeremy Chan of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory on a project titled "Designing an ECU for Radiation Evironment." Matthew plans to design and test an electronic control unit and field-programmable gate array-based CPU suitable for use on planetary rovers exposed to high or variable radiation environments.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Kyla Defore, a senior in Geology, will continue researching the "Formation Processes of Martian Gully Systems" with mentor Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology. Kyla uses NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE images and CRISM visible and near infrared spectral data to study the location, orientation, size, and morphology of gullies. She is comparing these data with seasonal variations in Sun exposure and local environmental conditions to learn more about gully formation processes.

Derek Hand, a senior in Astronomy and Physics, will continue researching "Molecular Gas in Merging Galaxies" with mentor Dr. Andreea Petric of the Gemini Observatory. Derek uses multiple data sets to study the properties of the molecular gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. This work will test theoretical predictions of changes in the molecular gas due to merging galaxies and to activity related to super massive black holes.

Nicolette Thomas, a sophomore in Astronomy and Biology, is studying the "Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains" with mentor Dr. John Hamilton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Nicolette is collecting rock samples for DNA extraction and amplification to analyze microbial populations. This Hawai‘i-based field project is an analog astrobiology investigation applicable to studies of the volcanic plains and past habitable environments on Mars.

Spring 2016 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Amber Mokelke, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology in the laser space weathering laboratory. In her project, "Modeling Micrometeorite Impacts," Amber is using a spectrometer to collect data from samples under vacuum conditions that are subjected to simulated micrometeorite bombardment and space weathering.

Tayler Pave, a junior in Computer Engineering, is studying "Real-time Measurements using a Graphical User Interface in Correspondice to Wirelessly Transmitted Data" with mentor Dr. Trevor Sorensen of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Tayler will write software for a ground control station to interpret incoming telemetry from a descending payload, in support of a current CanSat project.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Alexander Hedglen, a junior in Astronomy and Physics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on astronomical data reduction. Using his IDL and C programming skills, Alexander is processing raw images and calibration files of galaxies in optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data in his project, "Learning Data Reduction of Astronomical Spectra."

Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory—HSFL Trainees:

Glenn Galvizo, Christianne Izumigawa, Joshua Lam, Tina Li, Andrew Nguyen, Adrianna Saymo, Pei Sheng Xu, and Chase Yasunaga are working on the New Mexico Sounding Rocket Team of the CubeSat Research and Development Project.

Honolulu Community College:

Andre Wang, USDA NIFA Awardee, working on "Launching Model Rockets with Payloads."

Kapi‘olani Community College:

Teanu Aumua, Ying Kit Chui, Isaac DeMello, Jessic Grazziotin, Alexine Niro, and Geena Wann-Kung are working on a CanSat competition team with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Sciences Department.

Preston Tran is working on the "Exploration of Voids Distribution in the vicinity of the Biggest Super Massive Black Holes using Public Cosmic Void Catalog."

Project Imua RockSat Trainees:

From Honolulu CC: Suraj Mehta, Onkar Nerukar, and Marcus Yamaguchi, "Using Intertial Measurements and Digital Image Processing to Track Motion"

From Kapi‘olani CC: Kala‘imoana Garcia, Jarren Endrina, Yu Gong, and Cody Shinsato, "Subsystem Integration in Collaboration with HSFL"

From Kaua‘i CC: Nicholas Herrmann, Kaina Allard-Mahoney, Darlyne McLeod, Brennen Sprenger, and Ryan Uyesono, Thermal/Gamma Detection in a Suborbital Mission"

From Windward CC: Elena Barbour, Richard Kahakui, Cale Mechler, Keith Nakamatsu, and Madori Rumpungworn, "Super Simple Sublimation Rocket (ScubeR)"

Project Imua RockSat Program Guidelines–Roles and Expectations

Spring 2015
Spring 2015 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2015 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 25, 2015 at UH Mānoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Spring 2015 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

James Bynes III, a senior in Electrical Engineering with previous trainee (2012) and fellowship (2013) experience, is working with mentor Dr. Gary Varner of the Department of Physics on a fiber-optic data network for a multi-institution, particle detector mission. In his project titled, "RF Over Optical Fiber Design and Implementation for the ExaVolt Antenna," James is focusing on the design and implementation of a radio frequency over fiber system to be used for data transmission in a scaled prototype of the ExaVolt balloon-embedded antenna.

Kathryn Hu, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is combining her interests in engineering and chemistry working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering to improve the efficiency of fuel cells in space applications. In her project titled, "Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanoforests as Gas Diffusion Layers for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells," Kathryn is growing carbon nanotube nanoforests by a chemical vapor deposition process and evaluating their performance in the fuel cells under different operating conditions.

Logan Magad-Weiss, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Ryan Ogliore of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a cosmochemistry project involving micron-scale particles. The title of his project is "Development of Sample Mounting for Stardust Interstellar Candidates." Using test analog grains, Logan is helping to develop techniques and protocols that could be used to prepare and analyze the oxygen isotopic compositions of dust grains, returned by NASA's Stardust Mission, that are suspected to come from the contemporary interstellar dust stream.

Kimberly Teehera, a sophomore in Biochemistry with previous trainee experience (2014) studying lava tubes will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy and co-mentor Myriam Telus of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project titled "Secondary Minerals in Lava Tubes on Mauna Loa." Kimberly will use a variety of analysis techniques to identify minerals and chemical processes from a collection of water and rock samples. Studies of terrestrial ice-filled lava tubes are relevant to the fields of astrobiology and climate of Mars.

Brian Yamashiro, a senior in Physics will continue to work with mentor Dr. Veronica Bindi of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a high energy physics project, focusing on solar energetic particles. Utilizing data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer installed on the International Space Station, Brian's project, "Study of the Most Harmful Solar Energetic Particle for Shielding Next Human Space Flights," supports NASA's efforts to improve the prediction of large solar storms.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Christina Cauley, a senior in Geology and Anthropology, is continuing to work on a project titled "Remote Sensing and Geologic Map of Chegem Caldera, Russia." Using geospatial software for image processing and mapping, Christina is digitizing and registering old geologic field maps onto accurate topographic maps based on Space Shuttle–Digital Elevation Model data. She will also use the collected field data and new remote sensing data to improve the accuracy of the geologic details on the final map. Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology is serving as mentor.

Casey Jones, a junior in Physics, will continue working with data from the UH 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea of star-forming regions in 20 different galaxies. In his project titled, "Correcting Spectral Data from Extragalactic Star Forming Regions for Atmospheric Dispersion," Casey is working with mentor Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy to code solutions to calculate the atmospheric dispersion corrections for 33,000 spectra, apply the corrections, and rebuild the database. The corrected data allow for calculations of star formation rates.

Robert Ponga, a senior in Astronomy and Physics, is continuing to work with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy to characterize the highly enriched gas surrounding distant galaxies. In his project titled, "Analysis of Strong Triply Ionized Carbon Systems in Galaxy Halos," Robert is using a suite of software programs to model spectral data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, looking in particular for heavy-element enrichment of the gas.

Jasmin Silva, a sophomore in Astronomy and Physics, will combine her interests in astronomy, physics, and math to study the gaseous structure surrounding galaxies and its evolution with time. In her project titled, "Understanding Galactic Evolution through Absorption," Jasmin is using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct and analyze composite absorption-line spectra of the cosmic web. Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Astronomy and Physics is serving as mentor.

 

Spring 2015 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Rachel Chang, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will work on a project titled "Investigating Sea-Level Rise and Shoreline Change with Satellites" with mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Rachel will gain experience with coastal geomorphology, tide data, and remote sensing data relevant to shoreline change for areas vulnerable to reshaping and flooding caused by rise in sea levels.

 

Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory—HSFL Trainees:

Glenn Galvizo, Christianne Izumigawa, Tina Li, Andrew Nguyen, Adrianna Saymo, and Chase Yasunaga are working on the New Mexico Sounding Rocket Team of the CubeSat Research and Development Project.

Aaron Nagamine and Grant Takara are working on a project titled "Development of the Next Generation of Electromagnetic Torque Rods to Control a Small Satellite."

 

Matthew Domenichelli, Joshua F

Kapi‘olani Community College:

aumuina, Erin Hashimoto, Vincent Nguyen, Bryson Racoma, and Po‘okela Stillman Reyes are working on a CanSat team with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Sciences Department.

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Steven Westerman is working on a project titled "Operation and Maintenance of Kaua‘i CC's Ground Facility."

 

  UH Maui College:

Jordan Moore is working with mentor Dr. Jung Won Park of the Electronic and Computer Engineering Technology Department on a project titled "Maui Irradiance Forecasting Capability Through Sky Imaging."

 

Project Imua RockSat Trainees:

Working together on "UHCC Collaborative Approach to Designing, Fabricating, Assembling, and Testing a Scientific Payload for Launch Onboard RockSat-X"

From Honolulu CC: Matthew Mau, Debora Pei, Suraj Mehta

From Kapi'olani CC: Kala‘imoana Garcia, Mitch Mikami, Jackson Pascablo

From Kaua‘i CC: Nicholas Herrmann, Marcus Yamaguchi, Amber Mokelke, Eric Rita, Brennen Sprenger

From Windward CC: Elena Barbour, Kalanikapu Copp, Keith Nakamatsu, Cale Mechler, Madori Rumpungworn

 

Summer 2015 Undergraduate Internships

Christina Cauley (UH Hilo) Summer Internship at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

Spring 2014
Spring 2014 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2014 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 26, 2014 at UH Mānoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Spring 2014 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Eric Caldwell, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi'olani Community College Math and Sciences Department and Fellows Lee Do and Arvin Niro on an autonomous rover. Eric's work includes the design and construction of the rover as well as electrical circuit modeling in his project, titled "Design, Analysis, and Manufacturing of a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) Simulation for the Modeling of an Autonomous Traction Control Apparatus."

Lee Do, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi'olani Community College Math and Sciences Department and Fellows Eric Caldwell and Arvin Niro on an autonomous rover. Lee's project, "Design, Analysis, and Manufacture of an Active Control Panel with Vibration Suppression on an Autonomous Interplanetary Rover" focuses on reducing vibrations between the rover chassis and electronics board for optimal performance.

Steven Ewers, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will lead the design of the electrical and power-monitoring systems for the Kapi‘olani Community College's rover entry to NASA's international Robotics Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center. Steven will conduct his project titled, "Robotics for the Design of a Competition Mining Robot with the Purpose of Excavating Simulated Martian Regloith" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department.

Jessica Lee, a junior in Computer Science and Korean, will continue working on her project titled "Tools for Infrared Imaging on Mauna Kea" with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy. Jessica's project combines programming and instrument building as part of an infrared remote sensing project on microclimates and permafrost in cinder cones near the summit of Mauna Kea. The Hawaiian sites may serve as terrestrial microclimate analogs for Mars.

Liem Nguyen, a senior in Physics, will lead the mechanical design of a regolith collection, storage, and deposit system for the Kapi‘olani Community College's rover entry to NASA's international Lunabotics Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center. Liem is conducting his project titled, "Design of a Regolith Collection-Storage-Deposit System for Hawai‘i Lunabot" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department.

Arvin Niro, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department and Fellows Eric Caldwell and Lee Do on an autonomous rover. Arvin's work will include the design and construction of an efficient suspension system in his project, titled "Design and Development of a Suspension System used in Rough-Terrain Vechicle Control for Vibration Suppression in Planetary Exploration."

Melissa Onishi, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Dilmurat Azimov of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. With the aim of increasing the landing accuracy of robotic rovers on planetary surfaces, Melissa is writing and testing algorithms to simulate landing trajectories for autonomous, powered descent that is as fuel-efficient and precise as possible. Her project is titled, "Analysis of Landing Trajectory Using Backward Propagation."

Roberto Ramilo Jr., a junior in Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science, will work on a project titled "The Estimation of Daytime Sleepiness for Astronauts" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department. By combining qualitative data with his new approach of measuring fluctuations of pupil diameter, Roberto is collecting quantitative data from student test subjects to establish benchmarks for problematic sleepiness, which could someday be applied to fitness assessments of astronauts on duty.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Andrew McNichols, a senior in Physics and Astronomy, will continue working with his mentor Dr. Jesse Goldman of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Fellow Robert Pipes on a detector of elementary subatomic particles. Andrew is using it to measure the energy and angular dependence of cosmic-ray muons on the slopes of Mauna Kea. The title of his project is "Variable Altitude Muon Detection and Energy Dependence of Cosmic-Ray Muons."

Robert Pipes, a senior in Physics and Astronomy, has set up and calibrated a muon detection system and will continue to use it to investigate the angular dependence of cosmic-ray muon lifetimes as a function of altitudes between sea level and the top of Mauna Kea. Working with mentor Dr. Jesse Goldman of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Fellow Andrew McNichols, Robert's project is titled "Variable Altitude Muon Detection and Angular Dependence of Cosmic Ray Muon Lifetime at Medium Altitude."

Geoffrey Rehders, a senior in Geology, will continue working on a project titled "Hyperspectral Mapping of Alteration in Halemaumau Crater and Kilauea Caldera" using data from airborne and portable field instruments to characterize the spatial distribution of alteration minerals. Building on previous fellows' projects, this work is relevant to hypotheses on the possible ways sulfates and associated alteration deposits formed on Mars. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Kenneth Hon of the Department of Geology.

 

Spring 2014 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Brian Chan, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will work on a project titled "Orthorectification of Infrared Images" with mentors Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy and Dr. Brendan Hermalyn of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. This project involves geometric image mainipulation and processing of remote sensing infrared data aimed at understanding the microclimates in craters on Mauna Kea, which may be analogous to craters on Mars.

Lauren Froberg, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Michael Garcia of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on her project titled, "Submarine Lavas Discovered off Diamond Head—New Honolulu Volcano?" Lauren will investigate the mineralogy and trace element chemistry of rock samples to help determine if these are from a known or previously unidentified eruption. This work contributes to NASA's goals of characterizing the dynamics of Earth's surface and interior and forming the scientific basis for the assessment and mitigation of natural hazards.

Jamal Garcia, a sophomore in Physics, will learn to operate the Terra X-ray diffraction & X-ray fluorescence instrument and investigate the mineralogy and chemical composition of core samples taken from the shore of a pond in Antarctica. Jamal's project, "Don Juan Pond: A Terrestrial Study of Mars Analogs" will help to evaluate hypotheses of how this pond formed, which may lead to further insights to water action on Mars. Dr. Peter Englert of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology serves as mentor.

Kihaakeanu Sai, a sophomore in Sociology, will gain experience with satellite remote sensing data and image processing techniques in his project titled "Geology of Moons of Jupiter and Saturn." Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Kimberly Teehera, a freshman in Pre-Psychology, will work on a project titled "Lava Tube Microclimates on Mauna Loa" with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy. Kimberly will gain experience with basic data analysis techniques as well as with cave science. Studies of these ice-filled lava tubes are relevant to the fields of astrobiology and climate of Mars.

 

Kapi‘olani and Leeward Community College:

The Kapi‘olani Cansat team consists of William Kaeo, Michael Lee, Mitch Mikami, Robert Landgraf, Shane Spencer, Lundy Wyre, and Benjamin Barker (LCC), Brandon Fukada (LCC). The mentor is Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Science Department and KCC STEM Program.

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Bransen Agu, Dominique Boeder, and Kepa Fernandes "Designing a High-Speed Data Collection System with Application to Spectrographic Neutron Detection."

Marcus Yamaguchi, "Modification of UV Spectrometer into a Neutron Detector Using Neutron-Sensitive Scintillating Material."
Mentors for the Kaua‘i CC students are Dr. Georgeanne Friend and Mr. Michael Hannawald of the Electronics Technology Department.

 

Windward Community College:

The NASA Student Launch Project (ARLISS) team consists of Lyra Hancock, Gavin Nall, Nick Herrera, Kevin Lee, and Kristin Schupp, Ada Garcia, and Cale Mechler. Mentors are Drs. Jacob Hudson and Joe Ciotti of Windward Community College.

Kalanikapu Copp, trainee with Dr. Mary Beth Laychak of the Natural Science Department.

Spring 2013
Spring 2013 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2013 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 27, 2013 at UH Manoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Spring 2013 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Justin Bergonio, a junior in Physics, is continuing an astronomy project on near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) with mentor Dr. David Tholen of the Institute for Astronomy. Justin is utilizing data from the Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala, learning about celestial mechanics and calculating orbital solutions of high priority targets in his project titled, "Advanced NEA Tracking."

James Bynes III, a junior in Electrical Engineering with previous experience on the KCC CanSat team, is continuing to work on a team project titled, "Experimental Design for the Measurement of the Thrust Force Produced by an Asymmetrical Capacitor" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Department of Math and Science, Kapi‘olani Community College. James is responsible for system construction and integration of this experimental lifter, which the team is testing as a potential space transportation method.

Laura Corley, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Paul Lucey of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on her project titled, "The Geology of the Lunar North Pole: Mineralogy and Previously Unidentified Mare Material." Laura will investigate the surface geology, with particular attention on the mineralogy and types of volcanic deposits, using data sets from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's KAGUYA (SELENE) mission.

Kenneth Dobbs, a senior in Political Science, who completed a previous Fellowship analyzing planetary gamma-ray data, is working with mentor Dr. Peter Englert of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a new project titled, "Reevaluating Elemental Abundance on the Moon." Kenneth will compare algorithms and analysis methods used on gamma-ray spectra from NASA's Lunar Prospector spacecraft to determine why discrepancies may exist in identifying spectral peaks in an effort to improve elemental concentration maps for the lunar surface.

John Furumo, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is continuing his work on the design, fabrication, and testing of a cold-gas propulsion system for microsat/nanosat class satellites. With his mentor Dr. A. Zachary Trimble of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, John is work on a project titled, "Cold-gas Propulsion for Small Satellite Attitude Control, Station Keeping, and De-orbit." John has previous experience researching spacecraft thermal control on UH nanosatellite teams and he completed a Summer 2011 NASA Marshall Academy-Hawai‘i Space Grant internship.

Lisa Kotowski, a junior in Physics is continuing to work on a team project titled, "The Force Produced and Obserced by an Asymmetric Capacitor Thruster as Measured in Horizontal and Vertical Configurations" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Department of Math and Science, Kapi‘olani Community College. Lisa is responsible for predicting system performance, and the data and error analysis of this experimental lifter, which the team is testing as a potential space transportation method.

Heidi Needham, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will use high-resolution orbital lunar images to map flows in the maria on the Moon in a project titled, "Investigation of Layered Lunar Mare Lava Flows through LROC Imagery and Terrestrial Analogs." Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Heidi will also use layered Hawaiian basaltic lava flows as terrestrial analog sites to help interpret the lunar data. This work is related to previous Fellows' projects studying layered lava flows and characteristics of buried regolith deposits on the Moon.

Justin Nicholas, a senior in Creative Media, will be applying his skills in animation to an education/public outreach project about the NASA MESSENGER mission to Mercury. Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Sherman of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Justin's project, "Presenting Current Mercury MESSENGER Information on the Magic Planet for General Audiences" capitalizes on the dynamic way that digital video globes allow 3-D visualization.

Morgan Roman, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will work on a project titled "Star Tracker Test Module" with mentors Eric Pilger and Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Extending a previous Fellow's satellite-tracker project, Morgan plans to design and fabricate a new device that tests the performance of a star tracker, which HSFL is interested in using for attitude control of small satellites.

Brayden VanAckeren, a junior in Economics and Political Science, having completed two traineeship semesters learning to investigate the topography of Mars, will focus on a new project titled, "Analysis of the Formation of Central Mounds within Martian Craters." With his mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Brayden will collect and analyze details of the global distribution and sizes of Martian craters and their associated central mounds.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Jordan Bledsoe, a sophomore in Physics and Astronomy, will continue studying how variations in the abundances of the interstellar medium and the initial mass function (IMF) could modulate star formation rates (SFRs). Jordan is using existing data and data she is collecting with the UH 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea under the mentorship of Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The project title is "Studying the Effects of the Initial Mass Function and Metallicity on the Star Formation Rates of Star-forming Regions."

Meghann Decker, a senior in Geology, will work on a project titled, "Roots of the Halema'uma'u Crater Acid Sulfate System on Kilauea Volcano" using lab spectrometers and microscopes for element and mineral analyses. Building on previous fellows' projects, this work is relevant to on-going research on the possible formation mechanisms of sulfates and associated alteration deposits on Mars. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Kenneth Hon of the Department of Geology.

Travis Reardon, a sophomore in Geology, will work with mentor Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology on a project related to the grand challenges of mitigating natural hazards associated with global climate change, including rare and extreme events. Travis' project titled, "Application of LIDAR Topographical Data to Mapping of Climate-related Sea Level Rise," will incorporate remote sensing data to create coastal inundation maps for selected regions.

 

 

Spring 2013 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Brooke Winans, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will work on her project titled, "Lava Flows of Elysium Mons" with mentor Dr. Scott Rowland of the Department of Geology and Geophysics. Using high-resolution images and thermal emission data of Mars obtained from orbiting NASA spacecraft, Brooke will map lava flows and look for vent structures.

 

Honolulu Community College:

Samuel Eastwood, "Microcontroller Applications."

Jesse Ray Johnson, "Instrumentation Development for Closed Habitat Experiments."

Matthew Mau, "Closed Plant/Animal Habitat Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Cycles."
Mentor for the HCC students is Dr. Gregory Witteman of the Biology Department.

 

Kapi‘olani Community College:

The KCC Cansat team consists of Rae-Zan BelenMcClyde GabornoKelsey KawaguchiDiamond TacheraJoshua TamayoLogan Tamayo, and Taylor Viti. The mentor is Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Science Department and KCC STEM Program.

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Dominique Boeder, "Collection of UV Data and Comparison to Total Solar Irradiance."

Jeffrey Dorough, "Collection and Analysis of E-CALLISTO Solar Flare Spectrometer Data."

Marcus Yamaguchi, "Verification and Design of KCC Ground Station for Hawaii-SAT1 Mission."
Mentors for the Kaua‘i CC students are Dr. Georgeanne Friend and Mr. Tom Ellis of the Electronics Technology Department.

 

Leeward Community College:

The LCC Cansat team consists of Collins AuJordan BayangAlex DarigoAdrian DeleonMichael DubielElizabeth MahoneySusan OswaldVictor Ramos, and Jessi Tsukayama. The mentor is Dr. Nikolaj Nordkvist of the Math and Science Department.

 

Windward Community College:

Kristen BarsoumianAda GarciaLyra HandcockWarren Mamizuka, and Kristi Ross participated in NASA's "A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites" (ARLISS) and "University Student Launch Initiative" (USLI) competitions. Mentors are Drs. Jacob Hudson and Joe Ciotti of Windward Community College and Mr. Helen Rapozo from Honolulu Community College.

Spring 2012
Spring 2012 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2012 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo, and Kapi‘olani Community College. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Spring Symposium was held on Saturday, April 28, 2012 at UH Manoa. Symposium Schedule (pdf).

 

 

Spring 2012 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Justin Bergonio, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue his work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy using NASA orbital images of different resolutions spanning more than 30 years to study the surface of Mars; in particular, the rates of formation and fading of slope streaks. Justin's project titled, "The Lifetime and Abundance of Slope Streaks on Mars," will begin to incorporate new HiRISE images from the current NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Kyle Berney, a senior in Computer Science and Mathematics, will develop C and CUDA C code aimed at implementing a high-performance parallel-computing algorithm for calculating lunar surface temperatures. Kyle's project, "Lunar Temperature Calculations on a GPU," uses a programmable Graphics Processing Unit under the direction of mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy.

Emily Chang, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will continue working with mentor Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on a project on extra-solar planets. Emily is combining lightcurve data from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) program with images from the Faulkes telescope on Haleakala on her project titled, "Identification and Photometry of Candidate Transiting Exoplanet Signals."

Jonathan Chinen, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on a project titled, "TestSat Structure and Interface Design and Fabrication" with mentors Jeremy Chan and Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Jonathan's project is the design and fabrication of a TestSat, a laboratory testbed for modular CubeSat components and subsystems, able to rotate autonomously using solar panels and reaction wheel.

Kenneth Dobbs, a sophomore in Political Science, is working with mentor Dr. Peter Englert of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project titled, "Improvement of Planetary Gamma Ray Spectrometry." Kenneth will compile and evaluate gamma-ray data available from experimental simulations to learn how spectrum-line interferences from unwanted background components can be removed from the signal to ultimately improve elemental concentration maps of targeted planetary surfaces.

Elyse Iseke, a sophomore in Food Science/Human Nutrition, is measuring lunar crater dimensions to better understand crater origins and modification processes in her project titled, "Determining Dimensional Ratios for Fresh, Degraded, and Floor-Fractured Lunar Craters." Working with mentor, Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Elyse has prior experience using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data from her Fall 2011 Traineeship.

Brian James, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue developing interactive educational presentations about the Moon based on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data. Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Sherman of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Brian's project titled, "Education in 3-D: Using Interactive Spherical Projection Presentations to Teach about the Moon," will incorporate the use of clickers for audience response and action.

Tristan Martinez, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on a project titled, "COTS Adaptable Module for Full Attitude Determination in CubeSats" with mentors Eric Pilger and Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Tristan's project is the design and fabrication of a modular, sun tracker platform and attitude sensor using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware for use in testing CubeSat nanosatellites.

Reina Ojiri, a junior in Mathematics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Designing Space Craft Missions to NEOs." Reina's work emphasizes spatial-mechanics algorithms to create computer simulations of the optimal transfer of a satellite from one orbit to another to rendezvous with a Near-Earth Object.

Nathan Walsh, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Lance Yoneshige of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory on a project titled, "Development of a Deployable 3U CubeSat Solar Panel Array." Nathan's project is the design and fabrication of a solar array for increased power generation on low-Earth orbit nanosatellites and picosatellites.

Daniel Wukelic, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will design and fabricate a specialized calibration platform to test the attitude determination and control system of 3U CubeSats on a frictionless, air-bearing test platform. Daniel's project, "Air Bearing Attitude Determination and Control Subsystems (ADCS) Test Bed," will be conducted with mentors Lance Yoneshige and Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Liliana DeSmither, a junior in Geology, will continue working on an Earth analog study for silica-rich deposits and soils found on Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit. Working with mentor, Dr. Ken Hon of the Geology Department, Liliana is studying the occurrence, mineralogy, and modes of formation of selected samples collected on the island of Hawai‘i in her project titled, "Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Sublimates from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kilauea Volcano."

 

Kapi‘olani Community College:

Matthew Rappeline, Junior Fellow majoring in Physics, is working on a project titled "Orbital Dynamics of the Earth-Moon System" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Science Department and KCC STEM Program.

 

 

Spring 2012 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Collin Au, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Sarah Sherman of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project titled, "Making a Magic Planet Presentation for Mercury." Using data from NASA's MESSENGER mission currently orbiting Mercury, Collin will create an educational movie for projection on the Magic Planet digital video globe.

Brayden VanAckeren, a sophomore in Economics and Political Science, will work on a project titled, "Analysis of the Topography of Tooting Crater, Mars." Using images and elevation models from NASA mission data, Brayden will learn to construct and interpret topographic profiles, geomorphic maps, and perspective views of this young Martian crater. Drs. Sarah Sherman and Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology serve as mentors.

 

Hawai‘i Community College:

Daron Kirchner, majoring in Liberal Arts, and Kaya Ryan-Rolon, majoring in Liberal Arts, are working on a vog-aerosol project titled "Measurements of Atmospheric Particulates Using a Camera Lidar System" with mentor Dr. John Barnes of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Mauna Loa Observatory.

 

Kapi‘olani Community College:

The KCC Cansat team consists of James BynesJoselito GarciaSam Lewis who are pursuing an Associate of Science Degree in Natural Science, Mitchell Heins, an Information and Computer Science major, Kellie Ko, a Civil Engineering major, and Albert Carter, who is both a KCC and UHM student majoring in Mechanical Engineering. The team is led by Mitchell and their mentor is Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Science Department and KCC STEM Program.

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Heather Prinzing, majoring in Electronics Technology, is working with mentor Dr. Francis Takahashi on a project titled, "Telemetry Ground Station."

 

Windward Community College:

The USLI team consists of Kristi RossPatrick Lancaster who are Physics majors, Todd EspositoRose WailehuaLyra HandcockDarren Ramos, who are Engineering majors, and Sean Aylward, a Liberal Arts major. They are flying payloads in NASA's competitive "University Student Launch Initiative (USLI)." Mentors are Drs. Jacob Hudson and Joe Ciotti of Windward Community College and Mr. Helen Rapozo from Honolulu Community College.

Spring 2011
Spring 2011 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2011 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo, and Maui College.

Spring 2011 Undergraduate Fellowships

  University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Jennifer Beyer, a junior in Geology and Geophysics will use data from two observatories in the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) research program to help find exoplanets. These planets orbit stars beyond our Solar System and are of astrobiological interest as possible habitable environments. She will be analyzing light curves to identify possible transiting planet systems. Jennifer's work, titled "Finding Companions of M Dwarf Stars Using Data from WASP," will be conducted under mentor Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics.

James Bishop, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on lunar geology and remote sensing. With his project titled "Exploring Correlations Between Radar, Spectral, and Neutron Spectrometer Data to Determine TiO2 Content of the Lunar Maria" James is comparing data sets from multiple missions to try to identify trends, anomalies, and correlations in lunar surface titanium concentrations.

John Furumo, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on experiments to improve spacecraft thermal control. In his study titled, "Two-phase Micro-Channel Heat Sink Cooling Loop for Spacecraft Thermal Control" John will concentrate on system assembly and determining the effects of gravity on the thermal performance of the cooling loop.

Samantha Jacob, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is using lunar images and multispectral data to map and date overlapping lava flows on the surface of the Moon in her project titled, "Solar Wind Volatile Preservation." Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Samantha will compare her mapped units to numerical models of heat transfer into buried regolith deposits to help find ancient regolith with preserved solar wind particles.

Kimberly Rottas , a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute of Astronomy on a project titled, "Fading of Martian Slope Streaks." This work extends previous Fellows' remote sensing projects dealing with the physical characteristics and rates of fading of these surficial mass movements on Mars by incorporating new Context Camera images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Amanda Yamamoto, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working on a robotics project titled, "Underwater Sampling System for High Temperature Extremophiles" with mentor Dr. Brian Bingham of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Amanda will design, build, and test a prototype, autonomous sampling device that can be appended to a small ROV to collect seawater samples in hot shallow waters near volcanic activity. This work compliments the broad goals of NASA's Astrobiology program.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Ryan Bishop, a junior in Geology, is working on a project titled, "Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Sublimates from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kilauea Volcano" using lab spectrometers and microscopes for element and mineral analyses. This work is relevant to current research on the possible formation mechanisms of sulfates and associated alteration deposits on Mars. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Kenneth Hon of the Department of Geology.

Toby Horner, a sophomore in Mathematics and Computer Science, is putting his skills to work to help improve the performance of image processing algorithms for remote sensing data. Toby's project is titled "Evolving Matched Filter Transform Pairs for Satellite Image Compression." Serving as mentor is Dr. Michael Peterson of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Briana Hurley, a junior in Astronomy and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Jesse Goldman of the Department of Astronomy and Physics on statistical data analysis applied to large-scale phenomena of the universe. With her project titled "Statistically Determining the Likelihood of Finding Cosmic Strings" Briana plans to use computer models to determine the probability of finding cosmic strings that are predicted to exist by high energy physics theories.

Jamie Scharf, a senior in Geology, Astronomy, and Physics, is working on a project titled, "The Calibration of the CCD for Hoku Ke‘a." Obtaining observations under varied sky conditions, Jamie will characterize the spectral and throughput performance of the new science camera on the telescope, and create an exposure time calculator for the facility. Dr. William Heacox of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is serving as mentor.

 

University of Hawai‘i Maui College:

Kevin Roy, a sophomore in Liberal Arts, is working on a project titled, "Searching For and Tracking Near-Earth Objects and Potentially Hazardous Asteroids." He is using remotely-operated telescopes and performing image analysis to collect and submit astrometric information as part of a global effort to catalog these objects. Dr. John Pye of the STEM Unit is serving as mentor.

 

 

Spring 2011 Undergraduate Traineeships

Kapi‘olani Community College:

Jeffrey Griffith and Eric Jordan, "Autonomous Mapping Platform."

Stanley Weber, Mitchell Heins, Ghian Paolo Pajarillo, and Shohan Islam, "CanSat Competition."

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Cyril Botelho, Robert Garvida, Tisha Kurokawa, and Kira-Ashley Taylan, "Kauai: Rocketry, Weather System, and Telemetry."

 

Windward Community College:

Todd Esposito, Joleen Iwaniec, Patrick Lancaster, Jasmine Maru, and Kristi Ross, "Rocketry Competitions: CanSat/ARLISS Results and USLI Updates."

Nathaniel Hiraoka and Samuel Plunkett Jr., "Astronomical Research and Outreach at WCC's Lanihuli Observatory."

Spring 2010
Spring 2010 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2010 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo, and Maui College.

Spring 2010 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Michael Andonian, a senior in Mathematics will continue his work on the issues of control theory being developed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and how they can be applied to robots in space, specifically vehicles that will someday explore the oceans under the icy crust of Europa, Jupiter's moon. Michael is working on his project titled, "Guidance and Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles" with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics.

Yu Ming Cai, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will continue to expand on a project he began as a Space Grant Trainee (Spring, 2009) on thermal modeling and analyses relevant to all small satellite projects. Yu Ming is using advanced simulation tools during his project titled "Design and Analysis of the Thermal Control Sub-System of HawaiiSat." Serving as mentor is Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Samantha Jacob, a sophomore in Physics will continue to work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy on a project titled "Are Martian Slope Streaks Triggered by Dust Devils?" Samantha is using digital imaging processing techniques on orbital remote sensing images of Mars to identify dust devil tracks and slope steaks, to document the timing of their appearance, and try to determine cause/effect relationships.

Bao Jun Lei, a senior in Electrical Engineering will continue to work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on nanosatellite technology. With his project titled "Design of Electrical Power Subsystem using the CubeSat Stackable Interface" Bao is planning and testing a modular design that can be integrated within any type of CubeSat payload for optimum performance.

Matthew Markley, a senior in Geology and Geophysics will be working on a project titled, "Characterization of Temperature Dependent Macrostructure and Internal Elastic Properties of Boron Nitride Coated SiC Fibers." This work is relevant to improving the performance of ceramic-composite materials for use in aerospace vehicles. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Murli Manghnani of the Department of Geology and Geophysics.

Adonara Mucek, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics will work with mentor Dr. Katharina Pahnke of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on the role of oceans in the climate system. Adonara will combine laboratory analyses of the isotope geochemistry of North Atlantic Ocean sediments with satellite sea-surface data in her project, titled "Changes in Deep Ocean Circulation from Last Glacial Maximum to Present."

Nicole Wade, a senior in Mathematics will work on an Astrobiology project with mentor Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics. Nicole's project, titled "Microbial Population Analysis of a Volcanic Subglacial Lake" involves the use of an epifluorescence mircoscope to analyze terrestrial microbes from the extreme environments of an Icelandic perennial lake that may be possible analogs to environments on Mars or icy satellites.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Jonathan Bauer, a senior in Political Science will be working with mentor Dr. John Barnes, NOAA Scientist at the Mauna Loa Observatory, combining local weather station and NOAA regional data for improved understanding of weather patterns that could negatively affect operations at a coastal observatory. Jonathan's project is titled "Weather Modeling for Astronomy Observations at Kilohoku Observatory, Pearl City, Hawaii."

Sophie Milam, is a senior in Astronomy and Physics with NASA Ames Academy (Summer 2009) experience. With an eye toward growing crops in future greenhouses on the Moon, Sophie will be researching a method to alter the chemical composition of lunar regolith simulant in a project titled "Bioremediation of Lunar Regolith Via Microbial Metabolism." Serving as mentor is Dr. John Hamilton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Asael Temple, a junior in Computer Science plans to test image processing software used for the compression of satellite and aerial reconnaissance data for improved performance. Asael is working on his project titled, "Validation Techniques for Satellite Image Compression Algorithms" with mentor Dr. Michael Peterson of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

 

 

Spring 2010 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Dana Johnson, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering will be working on the decent control system for the CanSat small satellite being constructed at Kapiolani Community College. The CanSat team plans to compete in the June, 2010 launch competition in Texas. Serving as mentor is Dr. Hervé Collin of the Department of Math and Science, Kapiolani Community College.

Corey Shimabukuro, a senior in Electrical Engineering will be working with his mentor, Dr. John Rand of the Department of Math and Science, Kapiolani Community College, on all aspects of command handling and data control for the Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle being constructed at Kapiolani Community College. The team plans to compete in the June, 2010 competition in Hilo.

Fall 2020
Fall 2020 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2020 Undergraduate Fellowships

Michael Ito

Michael Ito

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Michael Ito, a junior in Math/Computer Science, is working with mentor Dr. Peter Sadowski, Department of Information and Computer Science on a project with the ​Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) began producing spectropolarimetric observations of the sun with extreme accuracy, resolution, and sensitivity. To fully utilize these measurements, new computational methods are necessary. Preliminary work has shown deep learning to be a natural solution. While standard models fail to exploit all the properties of the data, a deep neural network can quickly and more accurately make predictions by taking advantage of the spatial/temporal structure of the data. Here, we improve previous studies using deep learning and present an optimized model training pipeline, architecture, and hyperparameters, increasing training speed and overall performance

Lynzee Hoegger

Lynzee Hoegger

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lynzee Hoegger, a junior in Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Duncan Farrah, Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project to determine the accuracy of the classical black hole model, based on research from the 1960s, compared to one of the GEODE (Generic Objects of Dark Energy) models, based on the findings of the 2019 research done at the University of Hawai’i.

Alayna Espeseth

Alayna Espeseth

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Alayna Espeseth, a senior in Environmental Earth Science, is working with mentor Dr. Qi Chen, Department of Geography and Geophysics on a project to evaluate the differences between the elevation data of Oahu obtained from the GEDI and the ground elevation derived from airborne lidar data, examine how terrain and canopy properties affect these differences and investigate how GEDI data is used for measuring ground elevation in tropical environments. It is expected that the proposed research project will result in improved applications of current GEDI data for terrain elevation and canopy vertical height estimation in the tropics.

Samuel Dobry

Samuel Dobry

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Sam Dobry, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Nejhad, Department of Engineering on a project that utilizes a commercial Liquid Deposition Modeling Machine and modifies its components to successfully Additively Manufacture ceramic nanocomposites employing our Ceramic Nano-Paste. Furthermore, research with the Hawaii Nanotechnology Laboratory will be conducted to modify the composition of our Ceramic Nano-Paste to be better suited for the liquid deposition process.

Andrew Bailey

Andrew Bailey

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Andrew Bailey, a senior in Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Peter Englert, Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project evaluating the formation of Don Quixote Pond. Spectroscopic analysis of seasonal ponds in this region, such as Don Quixote Pond, increases our understanding of data collected by NASA on the red planet.

Tyler Bagnall

Tyler Bagnall

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Tyler Bagnall, a Senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with Dr. Mehrdad Nejhad of the Department of Engineering on a project to develop Continuous Fiber Ceramic Nanocomposites with the inclusion of Nanoforest I and nano-particles in a preceramic polymer to develop low-weight, low-cost, high-performance ceramic nanocomposites for the design and manufacturing of a 12U CubeSat Housing Structure.

Fall 2020 Undergraduate Traineeships

Kala`imoana Garcia

Kala`imoana Garcia

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kala`imoana Garcia, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Frances Zhu, Department of Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project to create an attitude control system using embedded torque coils in a print circuit board and using HSFL’s flight software named COSMOS. The project is pursued to help building low cost 1U cube satellite kits that are intended for use in education, encourage universities to integrate satellite design into their curricula.

Fall 2020 UH Community Colleges Undergraduate Traineeships

Daniel Nafarrete

Daniel Nafarrete

Kauaʻi Community College

Daniel Nafarrete, a junior, is working with mentor Dr. Georgeanne Purvinis, Department of Electronics Technology, on the project Kauai Community College Ground Station Operation and Maintenance. The goal of this project is to learn about tracking small satellites and systems, beginning with learning about Kauai Community College’s satellite tracking ground station configuration, operation, and maintenance. Kauai Community College (KauCC) operates a VHF/UHF and S-band satellite ground station to support small satellites launched by UH Manoa and other universities.  Currently UH Manoa is about to launch its Neutron-1 satellite, so the ground station will need to be serviced and revived to support the collection of data and communication with the satellite. Thus, this project entails learning how the station is configured and operated. Additionally, the station will be configured to operate with the global SatNOGS network.

Katlynn Vicuna

Katlynn Vicuna

Kapi‘olani Community College

Katlynn Vicuna, a junior in Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai, Department of Math and Sciences on the project Operation DECLUTTER, a project which collects data to show and catalog what space debris is in the orbit of Earth; separating what is usable technology from unnecessary debris. After completion of data collection, the project will formulate potential options for safe removal or continued use of objects. The project ultimately pursues to provide a sustainable and safe environment for future launches to inner orbit and outer space.

 

Fall 2019
Fall 2019 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2019 Undergraduate Fellowships

John Paul Batarao

John Paul Batarao

University of Guam

John Paul Bararao, a senior in Biology, is working on a remote sensing project related to water resources and mapping coastal freshwater discharge into the sea with mentor Dr. Romina King of the Department of Geography. In his project, “Development of Alternative Thermal Imaging Solutions for Submarine Groundwater Discharge,” John Paul is building and testing thermal imaging infrared sensors to detect temperature differences between fresh and salt water. The technology could be used on drones to collect data over rivers and estuaries, as well as coastal freshwater plumes.

Rachel Bellah

Rachel Bellah

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Rachel Bellah, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is continuing her work with mentor Dr. Przemyslaw Dera of the Department of Earth Sciences on “Testing Thermal-reflective Paint on Mars Soil Simulant” motivated by the need to characterize building materials suitable for future use on Mars. Using X-ray diffraction and temperature-step experiments, Rachel is evaluating the reflectivity, durability, and insulating capability of painted samples of compressed Mars soil simulant.

Jennifer Bragg

Jennifer Bragg

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Jennifer Bragg, a senior in Mathematics and Physics, is working with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the UH Institute for Astronomy on properties of young binary stars observed with adaptive optics, which corrects atmospheric blurring effects at ground-based telescopes. In her project, “Adaptive Optics Observations of Newborn Binaries,” Jennifer is collecting and analyzing data from multiple telescopes to research the ages and energy distributions of selected binary stars in the Orion Molecular Cloud star-forming region.

John Bredall

John Bredall

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

John Bredall, a senior in Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Benjamin Shappee of the UH Institute for Astronomy to study the photometric variability of Young Stellar Objects using data from the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). John’s project, “Baby Boomers: An ASAS-SN Survey of Variable Young Stellar Objects” is relevant to research of star and planetary formation.

Carrie Brooks

Carrie Brooks

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Carrie Brooks, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Klaus Sattler of the Department of Physics and Astronomy studying the “Systematic Variation of Process Time in the Hydrothermal Carbonization of Sucrose” for space applications. Carrie is experimenting with carbon nanofoams using a hydrothermal carbonization method, and using microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to characterize density and internal structures.

Kayli Chun

Kayli Chun

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kayli Chun, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the project, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Ceramic Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotube Nanoforest I and Preceramic Polymers Prepregged Composites for Space Applications.” With mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kayli will research ways to optimize strength and toughness of nanocomposite materials for improved mechanical performance, especially to avoid delamination during use in space.

Schelin Ireland

Schelin Ireland

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Schelin Ireland, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Paul Lucey of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project looking at craters on the Moon using orbital remote sensing data to ultimately estimate regolith thickness. Schelin will use data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment onboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and from the Multiband Imager onboard JAXA’s Kaguya Mission in her project “Thickness of the Lunar Highlands Regolith and Implications for the Impact Flux in the Early Solar System.”

Julian Pereda

Julian Pereda

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Julian Pereda, a sophomore in Mathematics, is working on a coordinated project with Fellow Alan Tong to improve data analysis from drone surveys over ecologically important field sites. With mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics, Julian is working on real-time, on-board capabilities for image analysis as well as programming for visualizing remote sensing data in an immersive, virtual reality environment in his project “Enhancing Geospatial Tools with Real-time Capabilities and Developing VR Environment.”

Mikhail Polivany

Mikhail Polivany

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Mikhail Polivany, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on an ongoing nanotechnology project. Mikhail is developing and evaluating the mechanical qualities of 3-D nanocomposite materials with interlaminar conductive fillers in his project titled, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotubes Nanoforest II and Prepreg-composite for Space Applications.”

Alan Tong

Alan Tong

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Alan Tong, a sophomore in Mathematics, is working on a coordinated project with Fellow Julian Pereda to improve data analysis from drone surveys over ecologically important field sites. Alan aims to apply topology (shape and structure in data) and spectral graph theory to the development of fast algorithms for mathematical clustering of remote sensing data, which can be used ultimately for automatic detection of a desired quality, such as tree health. Alan’s project, with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics, is titled “Development of Topological Data Analysis for On-board UAS Analysis.”

Fall 2019 Undergraduate Traineeships

Hunter Patton

Hunter Patton

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Hunter Patton, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Joseph Brown of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a laboratory project, “Meissner Effect in an Induced Electromagnetic Field.” Hunter is interested in experimenting with controlling the Meissner Effect while considering its possible use to activate motion of objects in space.

Ryan Sokolowski

Ryan Sokolowski

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Ryan Sokolowski, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Joseph Brown of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the field of materials development and thermomechanical characterization. Ryan’s project is titled “Structural Carbon Fabrication System and Applications Towards Hypersonics and Aerospace.”

Fall 2019 UH Community Colleges Undergraduate Traineeships

Honolulu Community Colleges Trainees

Honolulu Community Colleges Trainees

From left to right: Danthone Buyacao, Anna Gardner, Craig Opie, Lindsey Augustin, Anthony Lopez, and Leo Tanaka

Anna Gardner, Craig Opie, and Leo Tanaka, Project IMUA Trainees working on “ARLISS 2019 Comeback Competition: Secondary Payload Experiment ASEP.”

Lindsey Augustin, Danthone Buyacao, Mia Fong, and Anthony Lopez, Project IMUA Trainees working on “Spaceport America Cup 2020: Payload Designs and Component Proposals.”

Kapi’olani Community College Trainees

Kapi’olani Community College Trainees

From left to right: Brent Shigano, Celeste Guiles, Alden Andrei Fernandez, and Kiyomi Sanders

Alden Andrei Fernandez, “Analyzing and Characterizing Simulated Impact Craters using the AR Sandbox.”

Celeste Guiles, “Analysis of the Galactic Environment around the First Directly Observed Supermassive Black Hole Messier 87.”

Kiyomi Sanders, “Survey of the Destiny Profile of Galaxies around Supermassive Black Holes in Different Period of Universe by HEASARC Data.”

Brent Shigano, “Assessing the Aerodynamic Performance of Airfoils with Vortex Generator Additions.”

Kaua’i Community College Trainees

Kaua’i Community College Trainees

From left to right: Braden Stoddard, Jordan Karimi, and Angelina Ouye,

Jordan Karimi, Angelina Ouye, and Braden Stoddard, “RocksSat-X Project Kauida.”

Lyle Meyers

Lyle Meyers

UH Maui College

Lyle Myers, “Mobile Platform Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM).”

Kapi’olani Community College

Kapi’olani Community College

Kenny Kiriu is working with Dr. Radovan Milincic to study a fundamental interaction of physics in his project, “Design of a Galileo-style Apparatus for the Most Precise Measurement of the Gravitational Constant, G.” Kenny will learn experimental procedures required for achieving high-precision measurements with consistent accuracy.

Kiyomi Sanders is working with Dr. Radovan Milincic on a “Survey of the Density Profiles of Galaxies Around Supermassive Black Holes.” Kiyomi will gain experience with using data from NASA’s High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center, as she compares densities of galaxies as a function of distance from the black hole.”

 

 

Windward Community College Trainees

Windward Community College Trainees

From left to right: Connor Wilson, Jared Estrada, Connor Smith

Jared Estrada, Connor Smith, and Connor WIlson, Project IMUA Trainees working on “Project IMUA 8: Apophis.”

Fall 2018
Fall 2018 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2018 Undergraduate Fellowships

Reginald Tolentino

Reginald Tolentino

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Reginald Tolentino, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on the use of nanocomposite building materials for improvements in mechanical and physical properties of space structures. Reginald’s project is titled, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Ceramic Nanocomposites from Preceramic Polymers and Nanomaterials for Space Applications.”

Lean Teodoro

Lean Teodoro

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lean Teodoro, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Hope Ishii of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project in the Advanced Electron Microscopy Center at UH. Lean’s project, “Analysis of Solar System Building Blocks using Transmission Electron Microscopy” aims to identify and study chemically-primitive cometary dust among the particles collected from the Mauna Loa Cosmic Dust Collector

Adrian Ramirez

Adrian Ramirez

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Adrian Ramirez, a junior in Mechanical engineering, is working on a project titled, “Development of High-Performance Hierarchical Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites Employing Carbon Nanotube Nanoforests for Space Applications.” With mentor Dr. Mehrdad N. Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering Adrian is researching the thermomechanical properties of 3-D nano-size composite materials with and without interlaminar carbon nanotube nanoforests.

Samuel Dobry

Samuel Dobry

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Samuel Dobry, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “Development of a Modular Three-Axis Testbed for CubeSat ADCS” with Yosef Ben Gershom and Dr. Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Samuel’s work supports the Lab’s efforts in gaining greater modularity for 3U to 6U CubeSat designs of Attitude Determination and Control System components for orbital remote sensing missions.

Fall 2018 Undergraduate Traineeships

Joel Pederson

Joel Pederson

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Joel Pederson, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “Development of a Nadir Sensor Stimulator” with Yosef Ben Gershom and Dr. Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Joel’s work supports the Lab’s development of a motorized system to test and validate a CubeSat nadir sensor for Earth observations and planetary space missions.

Fall 2018 UH Community Colleges Undergraduate Traineeships

Preston Rodrigues-Magsayo and Alexander Meyer

University of Hawai'i Maui

Preston Rodrigues-Magsayo and Alexander Meyer, are working on a CanSat Competition project. The CanSat consists of two main components: a remote station (transmitter) and a base station (receiver). The team is exploring the use of auto-gyro descent control of a science payload when released from a launch vehicle.

 

Project IMUA Trainees (Mission 5)- A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites (ARLISS)

Project IMUA Trainees (Mission 5)- A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites (ARLISS)

Damien Apilando, Dylan Boeman, and Kat Bronston from Windward Community College worked together to design and build a foldable quadcopter to carry an atmospheric instrument payload designed by the Honolulu Community College team.

Mia Fong and Knyte Bennett- Jeremiah from Honolulu Community College worked together to design and build and atmospheric payload using a barometer and accelerometer to be carried by the quadcopter designed by the Windward Community College team.

Project IMUA Trainees (Mission 6)- NASA Student Launch Project

Project IMUA Trainees (Mission 6)- NASA Student Launch Project

Mike Andrews, Adam Macalalag, Matthew Nakamura, Eric Takahashi, Kat Bronston, Leomana Turalde, Lauren Grzegorczf from Windward Community College, Kapi’olani Community College, UH Manoa and Gerimi Tangonan, Ryan Young, Mia Fong, Jonathan York, Adriana Saymo, Knyte Bennett- Jeremiah from Honolulu Community College are working together for the 2019 NASA Student Launch Project, sponsored by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The student-designed and built rocket will lift the student-designed and built payload to a predetermined altitude, from which the payload rover will deploy to the ground to collect soil samples.

Kapi’olani Community College

Kapi’olani Community College

Mahealani Kini and Agnes Straatman worked on a project titled, “A Rover Prototype Designed for In-situ Resource Utilization of Utopia Planitia’s Ice reserves on Mars.”

Matthew Kohatsu and Cassidy Siegrist worked on a project titled, “Development of Astrodynamics Simulations to Calculate Intercept Trajectories of Nuclear ICBM Projectiles.”

Kiyomi Sanders worked on a project titled, “Analysis of Galaxies Density Profiles by Morphologic Type in the Vicinity of the Largest Supermassive Black Hole in the Universe.”

Jamie Stout worked on a project titled, “Prototyping Drag Devices and Landing Struts for a Small Planetary Lander.”

Summer 2018 Interns at NASA Centers 

Summer Interns at NASA Centers

Summer Interns at NASA Centers

Lauren Ward (NASA Summer Intern), a graduate student in the Department of Earth Sciences, worked with mentor Dr. Petya K.E. Campbell at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center on a summer project related to global carbon-cycle research and the use of measurements from space-based instruments. Lauren studied their relationship between photosynthesis activity and chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf and canopy scales in her project, “Seasonal Dynamics in Vegetation Solar-Induced Fluorescence Associated with Climate CO2 Dynamics.”

Michelle Masutatni (Hawai’i Space Flight Laboratory Lab Intern) was a summer intern at Teledyne Brown Engineering at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, supporting the Secondary Payloads Integration and Evolution Office. Her main task was a survey of commercial off-the-shelf secondary payload deployers for the Space Launch System. Michelle also learned about model-based systems engineering for information exchange between developers, and was introduced to Teledyne’s payload-operations support of the International Space Station.

Collin Takasaki (Hawai’i Space Flight Laboratory Lab Intern) was a summer intern at Teledyne Brown Engineering, at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, supporting development of autonomous operations in deep space. His main task was writing code for autonomous fluid transfer system.

Fall 2017
Fall 2017 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2017 Fellowships

Jeffrey Kleyner

Jeffrey Kleyner

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jeffrey Kleyner, a senior in Physics and Astrophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Geoffrey Mathews of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project modeling star ages in young stellar associations. Utilizing data from ESA’s Gaia satellite and new coding solutions, Jeffrey’s project, “Ages of Stars in Upper Scorpius Through Kinematic Motion,” supports NASA’s efforts to better understand the evolution of stars and their protoplanetary disks.

Zachary Langdalen

Zachary Langdalen

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Zachary Langdalen, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working on “Dispersal of Volcanic Ash on Mars: Ash Particle Shape Analysis” with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Using terrestrial ash as Martian analogues, Zachary’s detailed 3D microscopy of the ash dimensions and shapes will be used in models of particle sedimentation in the Martian atmosphere.

Dylan Morrison-Fogel

Dylan Morrison-Fogel

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Dylan Morrison-Fogel, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the “Optimization of Orbital Transfer Trajectories and Low Thrust Maneuvers,” applicable to small satellites. With mentor Dr. Dilmurat Azimov of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dylan will generate numerical solutions and run simulations in an effort to validate the maneuvers, such as orbital transfers and rendezvous and docking, that achieve the most efficient results.

Christopher Nguyen

Christopher Nguyen

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Christopher Nguyen, a senior in Information and Computer Sciences, is working with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Planetary Science Institute on big data in “Processing of Lunar Temperature Data using Cloud Computing.” Utilizing lunar temperature data from the Diviner instrument on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Christopher aims to calculate the time-average of a temperature-dependent quantity to find potential sublimation rates in support of NASA’s efforts to more accurately map the cold traps of ice on the Moon.

Lean Teodoro

Lean Teodoro

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lean Teodoro, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, is working with mentor Dr. Hope Ishii of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a laboratory project with interplanetary dust particles. Lean is using multiple, high-resolution microscopy methods to identify the particles and compile compositional data in her project, “Assessment of New Extraterrestrial Particle Collections at Mauna Loa Observatory.” This work supports NASA’s efforts to better understand comets, asteroids, and primitive materials of our Solar System.

Jason Tremblay

Jason Tremblay

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jason Tremblay, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is investigating the “Topographic Influences on Emplacement Dynamics of Lava Flows on Mars” with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Jason is working with multiple image and topographic datasets of Mars to create a GIS database of detailed flow dimensions and shapes that will be used in numerical models to understand how topography effects the flow and emplacement of lava across the surface.

Kenji Emerson

Kenji Emerson

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Kenji Emerson, a sophomore Physics and Astronomy double major, is “Studying Chemical-Composition Evolution of the Circumgalactic Gas” with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Using stacking analysis on Sloan Digital Sky Survey data of absorption-line spectra of triply ionized carbon and other species in the gas surrounding galaxies, Kenji aims to study the effects and evolution of metal abundances in the large-scale gaseous structure of the universe.

Theodore Pruyne

Theodore Pruyne

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Theodore Pruyne, a senior Physics and Astronomy double major, is working with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on hyperspectral data from the Canada-France-Hawai‘i Telescope on Maunakea as part of a large study of star formation and chemical enrichment in nearby spiral galaxies. Theodore is mapping nebular emission lines and studying gas kinematics in his project, “Nebular Physics in the Late-type Galaxy NGC 6822.”

Kyle Steckler

Kyle Steckler

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Kyle Steckler, a junior Physics and Astronomy double major, is “Investigating Distant Galaxies with OSIRIS on Keck” using near-infrared spectra obtained from the W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea. With mentor Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kyle’s work with telescope adaptive optics and data reduction and analysis contributes to the understanding of nebular chemical abundances, star formation rates, and evolution of distant galaxies.

Tino Wells

Tino Wells

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

Tino Wells, a junior Physics and Astronomy double major, is working on a “Non-parametric Clustering Analysis” of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tino is using statistical methods on stacked absorption-line systems of multiple ion species in an effort to classify gaseous structures in the cosmos and relate them to galaxy types

Allen Jake Aromin

Allen Jake Aromin

University of Guam

Allen Jake Aromin, a senior in Secondary Education, and John Tristan Palanca, a senior in Computer Science, are working with mentor Dr. Romina King of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences on a robotics project. Their “Design, Fabrication, and Programming of a Drilling System for Water Extraction from Subsurface Planetary Ice,” is inspired by NASA’s Mars Ice Challenge, a competition and demonstration project for improving in-situ resource utilization. Allen is concentrating on the fabrication and Tristan is concentrating on the programming, while both are working on the robot’s electrical system, assembly, and testing on simulated Martian ice.

John Tristan Palanca

John Tristan Palanca

University of Guam

Allen Jake Aromin, a senior in Secondary Education, and John Tristan Palanca, a senior in Computer Science, are working with mentor Dr. Romina King of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences on a robotics project. Their “Design, Fabrication, and Programming of a Drilling System for Water Extraction from Subsurface Planetary Ice,” is inspired by NASA’s Mars Ice Challenge, a competition and demonstration project for improving in-situ resource utilization. Allen is concentrating on the fabrication and Tristan is concentrating on the programming, while both are working on the robot’s electrical system, assembly, and testing on simulated Martian ice.

Fall 2017 Traineeships

Mark Achenbach

Mark Achenbach

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Mark Achenbach, a senior in Astrophysics, is working on a high energy physics project, developing algorithms to determine fast-neutron particle energy spectra and momentum distributions. With mentor, Dr. Sven Vahsen of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mark’s project is titled “Directional Neutron Spectroscopy via Detection of 3D Nuclear Recoils.”

Jarren Endrina

Jarren Endrina

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jarren Endrina, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on a project supporting Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory’s work on propulsion modules for more maneuverable small satellites. Jarren’s project “Cold Gas Propulsion System for 6U CubeSat” is under the guidance of mentor Dr. Miguel Nunes of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory.

Emma Hon

Emma Hon

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Emma Hon, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics, is working on “Space Resource Identification and Utilization” with mentor Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Using microscopy and imaging to identify the mineralogy and composition of meteorite and lunar samples, Emma is creating a database of materials as potential space-based natural resources and commodities.

Jennifer Kim

Jennifer Kim

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Jennifer Kim, a senior in Civil Engineering, is working on a nanophysics and materials science project with mentor Dr. Klaus Sattler of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Jennifer is synthesizing and characterizing foam in her project “Studies of Molecular Storage in Carbon Nanofoam, a Promising Superlight Material for NASA Space Missions.”

Lee Danielle Young

Lee Danielle Young

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Lee Danielle Young, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, is working on “CubeSat Structure Development” with mentor Lance Yoneshige of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory. Lee Danielle’s work supports the Lab’s efforts in gaining greater modularity and flexibility in 6U CubeSat–small satellite structural designs for Earth observation and planetary space missions.

Fall 2017 HSFL Internships

Hawai’i Space Flight Laboratory Intern

Hawai’i Space Flight Laboratory Intern

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Kasey Hagi, a senior in Computer Engineering at UH Mānoa, worked on “Software Development for Neutron-1.”

Fall 2017 UH Community Colleges Traineeships

Project Imua Mission 3 RockSat- X 2017 Trainees

Project Imua Mission 3 RockSat- X 2017 Trainees

Project IMUA Mission 3 is a joint collaboration between campuses of the UH Community College System to encourage students to pursue STEM based careers by gaining experience creating scientific payloads for RockSat-X.

Honolulu Community College: Onkar Nerurkar, Syrus Valdivia, and Xiao Hua Li

Kaua’i and Windward Community Colleges: Nicholas Herrmann, Damien Apilando

Project IMUA Mission 5 ARLISS Trainees

Project IMUA Mission 5 ARLISS Trainees

Project IMUA Mission 5 is a collaboration between Honolulu and Windward Community Colleges with the overall goal to competing in the international competition called ARLISS – A Rocket launch for International Student Satellites. Students from HCC built a small atmospheric sensing electronic payload that fit in the quadcopter built by student from WCC.

Honolulu Community College: Brian Lam, Jonimar Guillermo, Knyte Bennet- Jeremiah, Syrus Valdivia, Onkar Nerurkar, and Michelle Yeh

Windward Community College: Damien Apilando, Dylan Boeman, Julian Earle, Aspen Morgan, Rhon Turalde, and Aolani Zidek 

Maxx Taga

Maxx Taga

Kapi'olani Community College

Maxx Taga, a student in Civil Engineering, worked with mentor Dr. Milincic Radovan on “Ssurvey of the Mass Profile in the Vicinity of the Largest Super Massive Black Hole NGO.”

Daniella Wallace

Daniella Wallace

Kapi'olani Community College

Daniella Wallace, a student in Chemistry, worked with mentor Dr. Milincic Radovan on “Surveying the Relative Abundance Profile of Elliptical Galaxies in the Vicinity of S5 0014+81.”

Melissa Martin

Melissa Martin

Kapi'olani Community College

Melissa Martin, a student in AS Natural Science-Engineering, worked with mentor Georgeanne Purvinis on “Using a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Generate Geospatial Data.”

James Thesken

James Thesken

Kaua'i Community College

James Thesken, a junior in Mechanical Engineering at UH Mānoa worked on “UAV Applications in Precision Agriculture.”

Fall 2016
Fall 2016 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2016 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Fall Symposium was held on Saturday, November 19, 2016 at Leeward Community College. This was the Symposium Agenda (pdf).

Fall 2016 Fellows

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Yosef Ben Gershom, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project to improve spacecraft thermal control that includes Fellow Brialyn Onodera and builds on work by former Space Grant Fellows. Yosef plans to design and build a new dynamic testing apparatus as part of his project, "Simulation of Microgravity Conditions through Dynamic Testing of a Two-Phase Microchannel Heat Sink Cooling Loop for Spacecraft Thermal Control."

Kaimi Kahihikolo, a sophomore Astrophysics and Mathematics double major, is working with mentor Dr. Geoffrey Mathews of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project titled "Thieving Stars Caught by Kepler: A Search for Intermittent Accretors in Kepler Binary Systems." Kaimi will use data from the 2.0m Faulkes telescope on Haleakala to study three binary star systems to test his hypothesis that brightening events detected by the Kepler telescope are due to two stars accreting. This work supports efforts to better understand mechansims of Type Ia supernovae and the theory of dark energy accelerating the expansion of the universe.

Lauren Mathews, a senior in Global Environmental Science, continues to work with mentor Dr. Craig Nelson of the Department of Oceanography on laboratory experiments to study the interacting effects of changes in water temperature and food nutrient-quality on zooplankton growth, survival, grazing rate, and stoichiometry over a whole life cycle. Lauren's project "Nutrition and Elemental Stoichiometry of Zooplankton Life Stages in Warming Tropical Oceans" is relevant to future modeling of oceanic carbon storage and carbon exchange among the ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Brialyn Onodera, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the "Construction and Implementation of a Two-Phase Microchannel Heat Sink in a Cooling Loop for Spacecraft Thermal Control." This study is in partnership with Fellow Yosef Ben Gershom and builds on work by former Space Grant Fellows under the mentorship of Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Brialyn aims to improve the design and test the components of a prototype cooling loop for maximum efficiency.

Heather Situ, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on the "Investigation of Ultralight Carbon Nanomaterials for Space-Related Applications." Her mentors are Dr. Klaus Sattler of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Dr. Murli Manghnani of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP). Heather is investigating the physical and chemical properties of synthesized carbon nanofoams using Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry.

Bryan Yamashiro, a senior in Physics, is working with mentor Dr. Philip von Doetinchem of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project modeling cosmic-ray trajectories through Earth's magnetic field. Utilizing data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer installed on the International Space Station, Brian's project, "Improving the Geomagnetic Cutoff Modeling for Cosmic-Ray Research," supports NASA's efforts to better understand the high-energy universe.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Alexander Hedglen, a seni Astronomy and Physics double major, is working with mentor Dr. Mark Chun of the Institute for Astronomy on "Designing and Implementing an Adaptive Optics Demonstrator." Following his previous Traineeships learning astronomical data reduction and processing, Alexander is now working on the opto-mechanical design and software applications for the 0.7-meter-telescope adaptive optics system in the new UH Hilo Hoku Ke‘a Observatory.

Nicolette Thomas, a junior Biology and Astrophysics double major, is working with mentor Dr. Michael Shintaku of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management on a plant study relevant to habitability and in-situ resource utilization on Mars. Nicolette is conducting transgenic plant work as part of her project "Metabolic Engineering of Plants for Detoxification of Martian Regolithic Perchlorate."

Travis Thieme, a junior Astronomy and Physics double major, is researching "Small-Scale Physical Properties of Nebulae in Nearby Disk Galaxies" with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Travis is using data from an imaging spectrometer at the 3.6-meter Canada-France-Hawai‘i telescope on Maunakea to study emission lines to better understand massive star formation and chemical enrichment processes in spirals.

Fall 2016 Trainees

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Brandon Watson, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Robert Jedicke of the Institute for Astronomy on a project using automated telescopic surveys to discover and characterize near-Earth asteroids. In his project, "Finding the Ideal Asteroid for In Situ Resource Utilization and Human Missions," Brandon will gain experience with the moving object processing system of the Pan-STARRS telescope on Haleakala.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Daryl Albano, a junior in Computer Science, is working with mentor John Hamilton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Daryl's project "Programming, Communications, and Robot Autonomy" is in support of the mining robot being constructed for a NASA competition at the Kennedy Space Center that fosters innovative robotic excavation concepts for future missions.

Callie Crowder, a senior Astronomy and Physics double major, is working with mentor Dr. R. Pierre Martin of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project titled "Integration and Commissioning of the new UH Hilo Hoku Ke‘a Observatory." Callie is working on the integration of software and hardware components of the new 0.7-meter telescope that will be used for education and outreach.

Carli Hand, a senior in Mathematics, is working on the "Electrical Setup and Control of a Mining Robot" with mentor Marc Roberts of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Carli's work on the electro-mechanical and communications systems supports UH Hilo's entry in NASA's robotic mining competition.

Chantelle Kiessner, a sophomore Astronomy and Physics double major, is working with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on "Profile Fitting Absorption-Line Spectra of Circumgalactic Gaseous Structure." Chantelle will gain experience with the specialized software and programming needed to analyze spectra to characterize the extended gaseous halos of distant galaxies.

 

University of Hawai‘i Maui College:

Dutch Akana is working on a project titled "Digital Phasing System for Radio JOVE," a NASA program to observe and analyze natural radio emissions of Jupiter, the Sun, and our galaxy.

 

Project Imua Mission 2 Trainees: Presenting together on "Follow-up and Experiences at NASA Wallops Flight Facility."

  • From Honolulu CC: Onkar Nerurkar
  • From Kapi'olani CC: Kala‘imoana Garcia
  • From Kaua‘i CC: Nicholas Herrmann
  • From Windward CC: Elena Barbour

 

Project Imua Mission 3 Trainees: Presenting together on "Improved ScubeR and Monitoring System."

  • From Honolulu CC: Onkar Nerurkar
  • From Kaua‘i CC: Nicholas Herrmann
  • From Windward CC: Cale Mechler, Pingyang Liu, and Damien Apilando

 

Windward Community College:

Cale Mechler is working on the "ARLISS Competition," a rocket launch for international student satellites.

Tianna Barber is working on a project "Matching Martian Topographic Features in Curiosity Panoramas with Orbital Images."

Fall 2015
Fall 2015 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2015 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Fall Symposium was held on Saturday, November 21, 2015 at UH Mānoa. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Fall 2015 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Logan Magad-Weiss, senior in Geology and Geophysics, will be researching "The Effects of Laser Space Weathering on Olivine and Pyroxene of Known Iron Values." Working with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Logan's laboratory project simulates the effects of space weathering on two common planet-forming minerals. This work is relevant to the interpretation of remote sensing data of airless planetary bodies whose surface properties have been changed by space weathering.

Kimberly Teehera, a junior in Biochemistry will continue working with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy on a project titled "Secondary Minerals in Lava Tubes on Mauna Loa." Kimberly is using a variety of analysis techniques to identify minerals and chemical processes from a collection of water and rock samples. The geochemical data will be compared to humidity and temperature conditions in the cave. Studies of terrestrial ice-filled lava tubes are relevant to the fields of astrobiology and climate of Mars.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Amy Brittain, a senior in Astronomy and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy on a project about star formation using optical data and new infrared spectroscopic data she will collect with NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility. The project involves a comparison of star masses and ages to evolutionary models and time scales for the formation of the Horsehead Nebula. The title of Amy's project is "Spectral Analysis of Newborn Stars in the Horsehead Nebula."

Kyla Defore, a senior in Geology, will be researching the "Formation Processes of Martian Gully Systems" with mentor Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology. Kyla will use NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/HiRISE images to study the location, orientation, size, and morphology of gullies. She will compare these data with seasonal variations in Sun exposure and local environmental conditions to learn more about gully formation processes.

Wilfred Gee, a senior in Astronomy, will work with mentor Dr. Joshua Walawender of the Subaru Telescope-National Astronomical Observatory of Japan on the photometric detection of planets orbiting other stars using robotic observatories. In his project "Demonstrating Exoplanet Discovery with the PANOPTES Citizen-Science Project," Wilfred will be generating light-curves and assessing the photometric capabilities of the PANOPTES imaging unit in preparation for an automated data pipeline.

Derek Hand, a senior in Astronomy and Physics will be researching "The Care and Growth of Merging Galaxies and Their Central Black Holes" with mentor Dr. Andreea Petric of the Gemini Observatory. Derek will use multiple data sets to study the properties of the molecular gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. This work will test theoretical predictions of changes in the molecular gas due to merging galaxies and to activity related to super massive black holes.

Jasmin Silva, a junior in Astronomy and Physics, will continue her project, "Understanding Galactic Evolution through Absorption," with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Astronomy and Physics. Jasmin is using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct and analyze composite absorption-line spectra of the cosmic web. This work contributes to the understanding of the gaseous structure surrounding galaxies and its evolution with time

Nicolette Thomas, a sophomore in Astronomy and Biology, will be studying the "Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains" with mentor Dr. John Hamilton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Nicolette will be collecting rock samples for laboratory analysis of their microbial populations. This Hawai‘i-based field project is an analog astrobiology investigation applicable to studies of the volcanic plains and past habitable environments on Mars.

Fall 2015 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa:

Amber Mokelke, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology in the laser space weathering laboratory. In her project, "Modeling Micrometeorite Impacts," Amber will help set up a new spectrometer to collect data in the mid-infrared spectral range from samples subjected to simulated micrometeorite bombardment and space weathering.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Jamison Domingsil, a senior in Environmental Science and Geography, will pursue his interests in remote sensing and using unmanned aerial vehicles to map invasive plants. Working with mentor Dr. Ryan Perroy of the Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Jamison will assit with data collection in the field and image processing and analysis in his project, "Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Detecting Miconia calvescens in Hawai'i Island."

Alexander Hedglen, a junior in Astronomy and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on astronomical data reduction. Using his IDL and C programming skills, Alexander will process raw images and calibration files of galaxies in optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data in his project, "Learning Data Reduction of Astronomical Spectra."

 

Kaua‘i Community College:

Darylene McLeod "Mechanical Modeling of Neutron Detecting Scintillators."

Project Imua RockSat Trainees:
Working together on "UHCC Collaborative Approach to Designing, Fabricating, Assembling, and Testing a Scientific Payload for Launch Onboard RockSat-X"

  • From Honolulu CC: Matthew Mau, Debora Pei, Suraj Mehta
  • From Kapi'olani CC: Kala‘imoana Garcia, Jarren Endrina, Yu Gong, and Cody Shinsato
  • From Kaua‘i CC: Nicholas Herrmann, Kaina Allard-Mahoney, Ryan Uyesono, and Brennen Sprenger
  • From Windward CC: Elena Barbour, Kalanikapu Copp, Keith Nakamatsu, Cale Mechler, Madori Rumpungworn

  Project Imua RockSat Program Guidelines–Roles and Expectations

 

Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory—HSFL Trainees:

Glenn Galvizo, Christianne Izumigawa, Tina Li, Andrew Nguyen, Adrianna Saymo, and Chase Yasunaga are working on the New Mexico Sounding Rocket Team of the CubeSat Research and Development Project.

Aaron Nagamine and Grant Takara are working on a project titled "Development of the Next Generation of Electromagnetic Torque Rods to Control a Small Satellite."

Fall 2014
Fall 2014 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2014 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Fall Symposium was held on Saturday, November 22, 2014 at Honolulu Community College. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Fall 2014 Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Steven Ewers, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will research microwave technology for wireless power transmission and with mentor Dr. David Garmire of the Department of Electrical Engineering. In his project titled, "Wireless Power Transfer System by Means of Microwaves," Steven will focus on designing, running simulation models, and constructing a system utilizing the 2.4 and 5.8GHz frequencies to efficiently transmit power over a range of at least 10 feet.

Kathryn Hu, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will combine her interests in engineering and chemistry to work with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering to improve the efficiency of fuel cells in space applications by utilizing carbon nanotubes. In her project titled, "Gas Diffusion Layers for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells using Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanoforests," Kathryn will process carbon nanotubes nanoforests by a chemical vapor deposition process and evaluate their performance in the fuel cells under different operating conditions.

Arvin Niro, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department on an autonomous rover. Arvin's work includes the design and construction of an efficient suspension system in his project, titled "Design and Development of a Suspension System used in Rough-Terrain Vehicle Control for Vibration Suppression in Planetary Exploration."

Roberto Ramilio Jr., a junior in Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science, will continue to work on "The Estimation of Daytime Sleepiness for Astronauts" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department. By combining qualitative data with his new approach of measuring fluctuations of pupil diameter, Roberto is collecting quantitative data from student test subjects to establish benchmarks for problematic sleepiness, which could someday be applied to fitness assessments of astronauts on duty.

Brian Yamashiro, a senior in Physics will work with mentor Dr. Veronica Bindi of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a high energy physics project, focusing on solar energetic particles. Utilizing data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer installed on the International Space Station, Brian's project, "Study of the Most Harmful Solar Energetic Particle for Shielding Next Human Space Flights," supports NASA's efforts to improve the prediction of large solar storms.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Christina Cauley, a senior in Geology and Anthropology, will work on a project covering "Digital Imagery and Geologic Map of Chegem Caldera, Russia." Using geospatial software for image processing and mapping, Christina will be registering and re-projecting old geologic field maps onto accurate topographic maps based on Space Shuttle–Digital Elevation Model data. She will also use the collected field data and new remote sensing data to improve the accuracy of the geologic details. Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology is serving as mentor.

Casey Jones, a junior in Physics, will work with data from the UH 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea of star-forming regions in 20 different galaxies. In his project titled, "Correcting Spectral Data from Extragalactic Star Forming Regions for Atmospheric Dispersion," Casey will work with mentor Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy to code solutions to calculate the atmospheric dispersion corrections for 33,000 spectra, apply the corrections, and rebuild the database.

Robert Ponga, a senior in Astronomy and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy to characterize the highly enriched gas surrounding distant galaxies. In his project titled, "Analysis of Strong Triply Ionized Carbon Systems in Galaxy Halos," Robert will be using a suite of software programs to model spectral data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, looking in particular for heavy-element enrichment of the gas.

 

 

Fall 2014 Trainees

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Brian Chan, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on a project titled "Orthorectification of Infrared Images" with mentors Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy and Dr. Brendan Hermalyn of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. This project involves geometric image manipulation and processing of remote sensing infrared data aimed at understanding the microclimates in craters on Mauna Kea, which may be analogous to craters on Mars.Lauren Froberg, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Michael Garcia of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on "Submarine Lavas Discovered off Diamond Head—New Honolulu Volcano?" Lauren is investigating the mineralogy and trace element chemistry of rocks to help determine if these are from a known or previously unidentified eruption. This work contributes to NASA's goals of characterizing the dynamics of Earth's surface and interior and forming the scientific basis for the assessment and mitigation of natural hazards.

Kihaakeanu Sai, a junior in Sociology, will continue working with satellite remote sensing data and learning image processing techniques in his project titled "Geology of Moons of Jupiter and Saturn." This semester he is studying radar images in preparation for studying Europa and Titan. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Kimberly Teehera, a sophomore in Pre-Psychology, will continue her project titled "Lava Tube Microclimates on Mauna Loa" with mentor Dr. Norbert Schörghofer of the Institute for Astronomy. Kimberly is gaining experience with data analysis techniques as well as with cave science. Studies of these terrestrial ice-filled lava tubes are relevant to the fields of astrobiology and climate of Mars.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

William Barden, sophomore in Astronomy, will work with mentor Dr. Kathy Cooksey of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on his project titled, "Precious Metals in SDSS Quasar Spectra: Mapping Galactic Gaseous Halos." William will gain experience with IDL programming and statistics using absorption-line spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

 

Kapi‘olani Community College:

Vincent Nguyen, Bryson Racoma, and Po‘okela Stillman Reyes are working on a Mini CanSat project titled "Drag Coefficient of a Payload's Flight" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Math and Sciences Department.

 

UH Maui College:

Jordan Moore is working with mentor Dr. Jung Won Park of the Electronic and Computer Engineering Technology Department on a project titled "Maui Irradiance Forecasting Capability Through Sky Imaging."

Derrick Torricer and Dominic Agabin participated in the RockOn 2014 Workshop at NASA Wallops Flight Facility

 

Windward Community College:

Nick HerreraGavin Nall, and Cale Mechler are working on "ARLISS: A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites" project with mentor Dr. Jacob Hudson of the Department of Natural Sciences.

Windward Community College Intern:

Kyle Chia Twogood is working as an Imaginarium intern with mentor Dr. Joseph Ciotti of the Department of Natural Sciences.

 

Multi-Campus Community College Project Imua RockSat Trainees:
Working together on "UHCC Collaborative Approach to Designing, Fabricating, Assembling and Testing a Scientific Payload for Launch Onboard RockSat-X"

  • From Honolulu CC: Matthew Mau, Debora Pei, Suraj Mehta
  • From Kaua'i CC: Nicholas Herrmann, Marcus Yamaguchi, Brennen Sprenger
  • From Windward CC: Cale Mechler, Kalanikapu Copp, Elena Barbour, Keith Nakamatsu, Madori Rumpungworn

 

Summer 2014 Internships

Marcus Yamaguchi, Kaua'i CC Summer Fellow: "An Embedded Microprocessor Design for the PSD of a Neutron Detector." Final Report

Jacob Matutino and Kolby Javinar, Kaua'i CC Summer Interns: "Low Density Supersonic Decelerator" NASA Wallops Flight Facility/Pacific Missile Range Facility Internships. Matutino's final Report   and Javinar's final Report

David Harris (UH Manoa) Summer Internship at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, "Modeling of H2O Adsorption on Zeolites." Final Report

Erik Wessel Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory Summer Internship, "Developiing a Software Tool to Enable Creation of Command Scripts for a Satellite Mission." Final Report

Fall 2013
Fall 2013 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2013 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Fall Symposium was held on Saturday, November 23, 2013 at Kapi‘olani Community College. This was the Symposium Schedule (pdf).

Fall 2013 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Eric Caldwell, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department and Fellow Lee Do on an autonomous rover. Eric's work will include the design and construction of the rover as well as electrical circuit modeling in his project, titled "Design, Analysis, and Manufacturing of a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) Simulation for the Modeling of an Autonomous Traction Control Apparatus."

Lee Do, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Aaron Hanai of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department and Fellow Eric Caldwell on an autonomous rover. Lee's project, "Design, Analysis, and Manufacture of an Active Control Panel with Vibration Suppression on an Autonomous Interplanetary Rover" will focus on reducing vibrations between the rover chassis and electronics board for optimal performance.

Jessica Lee, a junior in Computer Science and Korean, will work on a project titled "Tools for Infrared Imaging on Mauna Kea" with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy. Jessica's project combines programming and instrument building as part of an infrared remote sensing project on microclimates and permafrost in cinder cones near the summit of Mauna Kea. The Hawaiian sites may serve as terrestrial microclimate analogs for Mars.

Jeffrey Murl, a freshman in Geology and Geophysics, will be studying one of the fundamental physical processes of the space environment on airless bodies: space weathering. Using pulsed laser shots on mineral powders mixed with sulfur, Jeffrey will study the spectral changes caused by these simulated space weathering conditions under vacuum conditions in the lab. The project, titled "Sulfur Composition Effects on Space Weathering" is particularly relevant to remote sensing studies of the surfaces of the Moon and Mercury. Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology serves as mentor.

Heidi Needham, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will continue to use high-resolution orbital lunar images to map flows in the maria on the Moon in a project titled, "Investigation of Layered Lunar Lava Flows through LROC Imagery and Terrestrial Analogs." Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Heidi is using her ArcGIS mapping skills combined with field work on layered Hawaiian basaltic lava flows that are terrestrial analogs. This work is related to previous Fellows' projects studying layered lava flows and characteristics of buried regolith deposits on the Moon.

Liem Nguyen, a senior in Physics, will lead the mechanical design of a regolith collection, storage, and deposit system for the Kapi‘olani Community College's rover entry to NASA's international Lunabotics Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center. Liem will conduct his project titled, "Design of a Regolith Collection-Storage-Deposit System for Hawai‘i Lunabot" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Kapi‘olani Community College Math and Sciences Department.

Melissa Onishi, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, will work on a project titled "Precision Landing System Design Algorithms" with mentor Dr. Dilmurat Azimov of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. With the aim of increasing the landing accuracy of robotic rovers on planetary surfaces, Melissa will be writing and testing algorithms to simulate landing trajectories for autonomous, powered descent that is as fuel-efficient and precise as possible.

Brayden VanAckeren, a senior in Economics and Political Science, will continue working on the analysis of central mounds within Martian craters in his project titled, "Analysis of Curiosity's Path up Mount Sharp, Gale Crater, Mars." With his mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Brayden collected and analyzed details of the global distribution and sizes of Martian craters and their associated central mounds in relation to the geological history, and this semester focused on Gale crater.

Daniel Wukelic, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. A. Zachary Trimble of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on the project titled "Cold Gas Propulsion System for Small Satellite Attitude Control." Expanding on the work of former Fellow John Furumo (2012-2013), Daniel will equip the system with a new microcontroller and inertial measurement unit, and develop code to allow the system to actively determine its attitude and control its maneuvers.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Andrew McNichols, a senior in Physics and Astronomy, will work with his mentor Dr. Jesse Goldman of the Department of Physics and Astronomy to assemble a detector of elementary subatomic particles and use it to measure the energy and angular dependence of cosmic-ray muons on the slopes of Mauna Kea. The title of his project is "Variable Altitude Muon Detection: Energy and Angular Dependence of Cosmic-Ray Muons."

Robert Pipes, a senior in Physics and Astronomy, will set up and calibrate a muon detection system and use it to investigate the angular dependence of cosmic-ray muon lifetimes as a function of altitudes between sea level and the top of Mauna Kea. Working with mentor Dr. Jesse Goldman of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Robert's project is titled "Variable Altitude Muon Detection and Angular Dependence of Cosmic Ray Muon Lifetime at Medium Altitude."

Travis Reardon, a junior in Geology, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Jené Michaud of the Department of Geology on a project related to the grand challenges of mitigating natural hazards associated with global climate change, including rare and extreme events. Travis' project titled, "Application of LIDAR Topographical Data for Mapping of Climate-related Sea Level Rise," will incorporate remote sensing data to create coastal inundation maps for selected regions.

Geoffrey Rehders, a senior in Geology, will work on a project titled "Hyperspectral Mapping of Alteration in Halemaumau Crater and Kilauea Caldera" using data from airborne and portable field instruments to characterize the spatial distribution of alteration minerals. Building on previous fellows' projects, this project is relevant to on-going work on the possible ways sulfates and associated alteration deposits formed on Mars. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Kenneth Hon of the Department of Geology.

 

 

Fall 2013 Undergraduate Traineeships

Kaua‘i Community College:

Bransen Agu and Matthew Kawamura, "Building and Designing a UV Spectrometer for Atmospheric Dynamic Analysis: Phase 1."

Marcus Yamaguchi, "Study of Solar Neutron Events by Correlating e-Callisto Data with World Neutron Monitor Network."

Fall 2012
Fall 2012 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2012 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses. The Fall Symposium was took place on Saturday, November 17, 2012 at Windward Community College's Hokulani Imaginarium. [Symposium Schedule (pdf)].

Fall 2012 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Justin Bergonio, a junior in Physics, having completed two semesters on a planetary geology fellowship, will embark on a new astronomy project on near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Working with mentor Dr. David Tholen of the Institute for Astronomy, Justin will utilize data from the Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala in his project titled, "NEA Tracking and Assistance in Orbit Determination."

Kyle Berney, a senior in Computer Science and Mathematics, will continue his development of C and CUDA C code aimed at implementing a high-performance parallel-computing algorithm for calculating lunar surface temperatures. Kyle's project, "Lunar Temperature Calculations on a GPU," uses a programmable Graphics Processing Unit under the direction of mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy.

James Bynes III, a junior in Electrical Engineering with previous experience on the KCC CanSat team, will work on a team project titled, "Acceleration and Thrust of an Asymmetric Capacitor in a Microgravity Enviornment" with mentor Dr. Hervé Collin of the Department of Math and Science, Kapi‘olani Community College. James is responsible for system construction and integration of this experimental lifter, which they are testing as a potential space transportation method.

Kenneth Dobbs, a junior in Political Science, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Peter Englert of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a project titled, "Improvements on Planetary Gamma Ray Spectrometry." Kenneth is compiling and evaluating gamma-ray data available from experimental simulations to learn how spectrum-line interferences from unwanted background components can be removed from the signal to ultimately improve elemental concentration maps of targeted planetary surfaces.

John Furumo, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, having completed two fellowship semesters studying spacecraft thermal control, will turn his attention to the design, fabrication, and testing of a cold-gas propulsion system for small satellites. With his mentor Dr. A. Zachary Trimble of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, John will work on a project titled, "Cold-gas Propulsion for Small Satellite Attitude Control, Station Keeping, and De-orbit." John has previous experience on UH nanosatellite teams and completed a Summer 2011 NASA Marshall Academy-Hawai‘i Space Grant internship.

Evan Greer, a senior in Mechanical Engineering with work with mentor Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project focused on the optimization of wind energy systems. Evan will use computational fluid dynamics to investigate the flow around a wind turbine in his project titled, "Meteorologically Driven Simulation of an Adaptive Wind Turbine."

Elyse Iseke, a junior in Food Science/Human Nutrition, will continue measuring crater dimensions to better understand crater origins and modification processes with mentor, Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. In her project titled, "Measuring Mercurian Craters to Develop an Understanding of Mercury's Target Surface," Elyse is expanding her work from the Moon to the planet Mercury with MESSENGER data.

Lisa Kotowski, a junior in Physics will work on a team project titled, "Acceleration and Thrust of an Asymmetric Capacitor in a Microgravity Enviornment" with mentor Mr. Herve Collin of the Department of Math and Science, Kapi‘olani Community College. Lisa is responsible for predicting system performance, and the data and error analysis of this experimental lifter, which they are testing as a potential space transportation method.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Jordan Bledsoe, a sophomore in Physics and Astronomy, will be studying how variations in the abundances of the interstellar medium and the initial mass function (IMF) could modulate star formation rates (SFRs). Jordan will use existing data and data she will collect with the UH 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea under the mentorship of Dr. Marianne Takamiya of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The project title is "Studying the Effects of IMF and Metallicity on the SFRs of Star-forming Regions with Unusually Low Balmer Decrements."

Fall 2012 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Brayden VanAckeren, a junior in Economics and Political Science, will continuing working on his project titled, "Topographic Analysis of Martian Landforms" with mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Using images and elevation models from NASA mission data, Brayden is constructing and interpreting topographic profiles, geomorphic maps, and perspective views of Martian craters

Kaua‘i Community College:

Kolby Javinar and Jacob Matutino assembled a spectrometer in their project titled, "The E-Callisto Project," which is part of a larger system of solar radio spectrometers that will be used to observe solar flares.

Windward Community College:

Kristen BarsoumianAda GarciaLyra HandcockWarren Mamizuka, and Kristi Ross participated in NASA's "A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites" (ARLISS) and "University Student Launch Initiative" (USLI) competitions. Mentors are Drs. Jacob Hudson and Joe Ciotti of Windward Community College and Mr. Helen Rapozo from Honolulu Community College.

 

 

Summer 2012 Internships

Taylor Alfiler was a Kaua‘i summer intern at General Dynamics working on a project titled, "IP Fragmented Packet Reassembly."

Ken Oyadomari was a NASA Ames--Hawai‘i Space Grant summer intern in Mountain View, California on a project titled, "PhoneSat: Using Consumer Electronics in Space."

Daniel Wukelic, a senior in Mechanical Engineering at U.H. Manoa, was a NASA Ames--Aeronautics Academy--Hawai‘i Space Grant summer intern in Mountain View, California. He was involved in a project titled, "Designing Two Short-Haul Civil Tiltrotors." Daniel also completed a Spring 2012 Fellowship project with mentors from the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory.

Fall 2011
Fall 2011 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2011 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and Windward Community College.

Fall 2011 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Justin Bergonio, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will use NASA orbital images of different resolutions spanning more than 30 years to study the surface of Mars; in particular, the rates of formation and fading of slope streaks. Justin's project titled, "The Lifetime and Abundance of Slope Streaks on Mars," follows a long line of fellowship projects on slope streaks with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy.

Emily Chang, a senior in Global Environmental Science, is working under the direction of mentor Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on a project on extra-solar planets. Emily is working with data from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) program, the Faulkes telescope on Haleakala, and NASA's Kepler mission on her project titled, "Prediction of SuperWASP Stars with Detectable Transits using Kepler Data."

Brian James, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will develop new imagery sets from NASA data and interactive educational presentations for display on digital video globes. Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Sherman of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Brian's project is titled, "Bringing Mercury and the Moon to You Live and in 3-D: An Innovative and Engaging Multimedia Spherical Projection Using Data from Current NASA Missions."

Reina Ojiri, a junior in Mathematics, will work with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Designing Space Craft Missions to NEOs." Reina's work will emphasize spatial-mechanics algorithms to create computer simulations of the optimal trajectories of Near-Earth Objects for encounter by spacecraft.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Liliana DeSmither, a junior in Geology, will be working on an Earth analog study for silica-rich deposits and soils found on Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit. Working with mentor, Dr. Ken Hon of the Geology Department, Liliana will study the occurrence, mineralogy, and modes of formation of selected samples collected on the island of Hawai‘i in her project titled, "Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Sublimates from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kilauea Volcano."

 

 

Fall 2011 Undergraduate Traineeships

 University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Elyse Iseke, a sophomore in Food Science and Human Nutrition, will use Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter data from NASA's current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission to study one of the most important planetary surface features: Impact craters. With mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Elyse will measure crater dimensions to distinguish fresh craters from degraded craters and floor-fractured craters that were modified by igneous activity.

Windward Community College:

Todd Esposito, Patrick Lancaster, Jasmine Maru, and Kristi Ross, participated in the ARLISS competition under the guidance of mentors Dr. Joe Ciotti and Dr. Jake Hudson from WCC, and Helen Rapozo from Honolulu CC.

 

 

Fall 2011 Intern

Kale Nakata, a senior in Electrical Engineering at U. H. Manoa, was a part-time Hawaii Space Grant Intern at NovaSol in Honolulu.

 

 

Summer 2011 Interns

Robert Albarran, a senior in Astronomy and Physics and U. H. Hilo was a NASA Goddard--Space Grant summer intern. "A Cross-Examination of Saturnian Kilometric Radiation Emission Observed by Cassini and Ulysses"

Michael Andonian, a Master's student in Mathematics at U. H. Manoa was a Jet Propulsion Laboratory--Space Grant summer intern. "Simulations and GUIs: A New Look to Radio Science"

James Bishop, a junior in Geology and Geophysics at U. H. Manoa was a full-time summer Hawaii Space Grant Intern at NovaSol in Honolulu. "Defense Applications in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing"

Adria Fung, a freshman heading to Boston was a NASA Ames Robotics Academy--Space Grant summer intern. "Lunar Micro Rover Camera System Development"

John Furumo, a senior in Mechanical Engineering at U. H. Manoa was a NASA Marshall Academy--Space Grant summer intern. "Structural Optimization of Space Systems Using Genetic Algorithms"

Amber Imai, a senior in Electrical Engineering at U. H. Manoa was a full-time summer Hawaii Space Grant Intern at NovaSol in Honolulu. "Optical Communications at NovaSol"

Arlen Kam, a Master's student in Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University was a NASA Ames Academy--Space Grant summer intern. "LADEE Decommissioning Impact Dispersion Analysis"

Carissa Nakao, an incoming freshman in Mechanical Engineering at U. H. Manoa was a NASA Ames Robotics Academy--Space Grant summer intern. "Lunar Micro Rover Project"

Kevin Shin, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering at U. H. Manoa was a summer Hawaii Space Grant Intern at NovaSol in Honolulu. "Internship at NovaSol: Optical Communications"

 

Additional Summer Internships:

Four Kaua‘i Community College interns were funded for the 2011 Hawai‘i Space Grant Summer Internship Program. Kolby Javinar, Jacob Matutino, and Joshua Ponting worked at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. Crystal Whitehill worked at General Dynamics.

 

Fall 2010
Fall 2010 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2010 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2010 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

James Bishop, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on lunar geology and remote sensing. With his project titled "Testing the Relationship Between Radar Data and TiO2 Content of the Lunar Maria" James will compare radar, neutron spectrometer, and spectral data sets from multiple missions to try to identify trends, anomalies, and correlations in lunar surface titanium concentrations.

John Furumo, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on continued experiments to improve spacecraft thermal control. In his study titled, "Two-phase Micro-Channel Heat Sink Cooling Loop for Spacecraft Thermal Control" John will concentrate on system assembly and determining the effects of gravity on the thermal performance of the cooling loop.

Samantha Jacob, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, plans to use lunar images and multispectral data to map and date overlapping lava flows on the surface of the Moon in her project titled, "Solar Wind Volatile Preservation." Working with mentor Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Samantha will compare her mapped units to numerical models of heat transfer into buried regolith deposits to help find ancient regolith with preserved solar wind particles.

Amanda Yamamoto, a sophomore in Mechanical Engineering, will work on a robotics project titled, "Underwater Sampling System for High Temperature Extremophiles" with mentor Dr. Brian Bingham of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Amanda will design, build, and test a prototype, autonomous sampling device that can be appended to a small ROV to collect seawater samples in hot shallow waters near volcanic activity. This work compliments the broad goals of NASA's Astrobiology program.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Ryan Bishop, a junior in Geology, will be working on a project titled, "Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Sublimates from Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano" using lab spectrometers and microscopes for element and mineral analyses. This work is relevant to current research on the possible formation mechanisms of sulfates and associated alteration deposits on Mars. Serving as mentor for this work is Dr. Kenneth Hon of the Department of Geology.

Toby Horner, a sophomore in Mathematics and Computer Science, will put his skills to work to help improve the performance of image processing algorithms for remote sensing data. Toby's project is titled "Evolving Matched Filters for Satellite Image Compression." Serving as mentor is Dr. Michael Peterson of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Briana Hurley, a junior in Astronomy and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. David James of the Department of Astronomy and Physics on stellar mixing and evolution. With her project titled "Photometrically Re-Imaging the Pleiades Open Cluster using the Hoku Ke'a 0.9 meter Telescope" Briana is studying the masses and lithium abundances of Sun-like stars in the young star cluster.

Jamie Scharf, a senior in Geology, Astronomy, and Physics, will work on a project titled, "The Calibration of the CCD for Hoku Ke'a." Obtaining observations under varied sky conditions, Jamie will characterize the spectral and throughput performance of the new science camera on the telescope, and create an exposure time calculator for the facility. Dr. David James of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is serving as mentor.

 

 

Fall 2010 Undergraduate Traineeships

Thumy Webb, Honolulu CC, "Effects of Varying Light Cycles on Opae Ula and Microalgae in a Closed System" with mentor Dr. Gregory Witteman.

Charls AgcaoiliEvan Agor,Cy BaganoDarly Domingo, and Shawn Mercado of Kaua'i CC worked under the guidance of Dr. Francis Takahashi assisting with the developemnt of a CanSat and rocket for launch and landing on Kaua'i.

Todd Esposito, Joleen Iwaniec, Patrick Lancaster, and Jasmine Maru of Windward CC participated in the ARLISS competition under the guidance of mentors Dr. Joe Ciotti and Dr. Jake Hudson from WCC, and Helen Rapozo from Honolulu CC.

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses work together and participate in ARLISS Competitions (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada. Community college students have benefited from the mentorship of professors at Honolulu CC and Windward CC, and engineers from HECO and industry affiliates.

 

Summer 2010 Undergraduate Fellowship Program

Summer Fellowships are awarded to undergraduate students who are registered as full-time students for the Fall semester at one of the University of Hawai'i Community Colleges. Awards are given for space-related research and provide a stipend of $2000 per summer to each recipient.

Four students were funded for the 2010 Summer Fellowship Program at Kaua'i CC. Kelan AdachiShaun KoideDaryl Domingo, and Charls Agcaoili worked under the guidance of Dr. Francis Takahashi.

 

Summer 2010 Undergraduate Internship Program

Full-time undergraduates enrolled at either a university or community college in Hawai'i or on the mainland are eligible to apply for Summer Internships. The main objective of the program is to promote the use of NASA technology and educational opportunities in Hawai'i, and internships focusing on NASA's science goals are especially encouraged.

Seven interns were funded at three companies on Kaua'i for the 2010 Summer Internship Program. David Herr worked at Manu Kai at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kaua'i. Tiffany Eliana, Ric Fune, Melissa Peck, and Geoffrey Tran also worked at the PMRF. Crystal Whitehill and Mark Guirao worked at General Dynamics.

 

Additional Summer Internships:

Kelsey Auten, a sophomore in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, was a summer Hawaii Space Grant Intern working with the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory at the U. H. Manoa campus. Kelsey's project was "HawaiiSat-1: Effects of Varying Altitudes and Inclinations on a Satellite's Orbit Around the Earth."

Chester Lim, a Master's student in Electrical Engineering at U. H. Manoa, was a Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Space Grant summer intern. Chester's project was "A Model-Based Study of On-Board Data Processing Architecture for Balloon-Borne Aurora Observation."

Raynel Corpuz, a Master's student in Electrical Engineering at U. H. Manoa, was a NASA Ames summer intern. Raynel's project was "HawaiiSat-1 Modular String Solar Cell Layout Procedural Plan."

2009 - 2000

Summer 2009
Summer 2009 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2008
Summer 2008 Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2007
Summer 2007Undergraduate Participants

Summer 2006
Summer 2006 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2009
Spring 2009 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2009 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Hilo.

2009 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Jason Axelson, a senior in Electrical Engineering will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma on hardware and software issues for small satellites on a project titled "Design of a CubeSat Payload Interface." Jason's goal is to create a modular interface to support CubeSat payloads in an effort to systematize development efforts and meet budget constraints.

Amy Blas, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is continuing her efforts with the Kumu A‘o CubeSat team as project manager and co-lead for the telecommunication subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Amy and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting CubeSat satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Jeremy Chan, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is the systems engineer and co-lead of the Kumu A‘o CubeSat team, responsibilities he began last semester. He is also overseeing the official documentation for the entire project. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jeremy and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat mission.

Jeff Fines, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work on developing a telecom standard for CubeSat small satellites, helping to set a protocal for sending and receiving telemetry data. Jeff will be working on his project titled, "Design and Realization of a Standard for Telemetry Data Packeting" with mentor Jason Akagi, Avionics Engineering Lead for the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory.

Jeffrey Guzman, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on experiments to improve spacecraft thermal control. In his study titled, "Two-phase Micro-Channel Heat Sink Cooling Loop" Jeffrey is concentrating on system assembly and determining the effects of gravity on the thermal performance of the cooling loop.

Joshua Irvine, a senior in Biological Engineering, will pursue his research interests in bioenvironmental and agricultural engineering with a project that addresses new technologies that enable long-duration human space exploration. Joshua's project titled, "Biological Treatment and Reuse of Human Wastewater in Space" will be conducted with mentor Dr. P. Y. Yang of the Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering.

Reece Iwami, a senior in Electrical Engineering who has worked on U.H. CubeSat projects since his freshman year, including as a project leader, will take a new research direction into antennas. Reece's project is titled "Determination of the Effects and Applications of Multiple Interrogators on Retrodirective Arrays." Serving as mentor is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Kaveh Khosroshahi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is putting his skills to work for space technology and applications in a project titled, "Mechanical Performance and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes." Kaveh is continuing his study of carbon nano-composite materials grown on unidirectional carbon fiber tapes. Serving as mentor is Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Christina King, a junior in Art, will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy to research the characteristics and timing of the formation of dark streaks on slopes on the Martian surface. In her project titled, "Seasonality of Slope Streak Formation," Christina will learn processing and analysis techniques of geological remote sensing data.

Erin Miller, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Cecily Wolfe of the Department of Geology and Geophysics to study seismic data of Hawaiian volcanoes to help explain geologic behavior on other planetary bodies, detachment faulting in particular. Erin's project is titled "Magmatism and Faulting at Kilauea Volcano: An Analog to Tharsis Volcanoes on Mars."

Whitney Reyes, a junior in Botany, will continue pursuing her interests in documenting distribution and health of land cover in Hawai‘i in a project titled, "Mapping and Analysis of Vegetation Abundance, Diversity, and Health in a Hawaiian Locale Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing." Whitney is conducting field work to support her remote sensing mapping and analysis. Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Center for Microbial Oceanography and Harold Garbeil of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology are serving as mentors.

Isaac Rodrigues, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working for the Kumu A‘o CubeSat team as lead engineer of the telecommunication subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Isaac and undergraduate teammates are working to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Reid Yamura, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the electrical power subsystems for the Kumu A‘o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Reid and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat mission.

 

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo:

Jordan Olive, a freshman in Computer Science, will research dust deflection systems for use on instruments, cameras, and solar panels in the lunar environment. This will be a continuation and expansion of Jordan's summer, 2008 internship project at NASA Ames Research Center in California. Jordan's project is titled "Applying Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology to an Optical Surface on a Lunar Rover." Serving as mentor is Riley Ceria, Robotics Advisor for the College of Engineering.

David Trang, a senior in Astronomy, Geology, and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy on a project monitoring stars in the Orion Nebula using two robotic telescopes at Mauna Loa Observatory. The title of David's project is "Surveying Stellar Flares: Preparing for the VYSOS Telescope."

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses have worked together and participated in ARLISS Competitions (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites).

Premo Ames, Todd Esposito and Joleen Iwaniec, Windward Community College, are working with mentors Joe Ciotti, Jake Hudson, and Helen Rapozo, on "Holomua--The Way Forward: Continuing ARLISS Efforts." Their current efforts are focused on re-designing the electronics for quicker data acquisition and faster communications, as well as speedier location determination. In addition, their experiments continue to determine the most efficient airframe design.

 

2009 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Yu Ming Cai, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project titled, "Analysis and Design of the Thermal Control Sub-System of LEO-1". Yu Ming's thermal modeling and analyses are relevant to all small satellite projects.

 

Kauai Community College:

  • Eric Fune: "Modulation of Light (laser) for Audio Transmission"

  • Keelan Sakuda: "Space Warrior"

  • Bradly Wilcox: "Nature of Light with Applications to Astronomy and Biophotonics"

Spring 2008
Spring 2008 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2008 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

Spring 2008 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jessica Ayau, a sophomore in Education, will be working on a project titled, "Identification and Mapping of Hawaiian Coral Reefs Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing." Jessica's study area will be off the coast of O'ahu and she will combine ocean field work with a supervised-classification mapping technique on airborne remote sensing data. Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Center for Microbial Oceanography and Harold Garbeil of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology are serving as mentors.

Nathan Britton, a senior in Information and Computer Science, is combining his interests in gaming software and space exploration to create a game engine for diverse space and planetary environments. Nathan's project, "Space Sports/Training Simulation," addresses design and programming issues as well as accurate physical parameters for humans and objects interacting in a variety of settings. Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Science continues to serve as mentor.

Chak Shing Jackie Chan, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be researching the hardware requirements and configuration needed for the attitude control subsystem of a small satellite in low-Earth orbit. Chak Shing's project, titled "Preliminary Hardware Design of the Attitude Control Subsystem" is being conducted under the mentorship of Dr. Amit Sanyal of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Jeremy Chan, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work on the command and data handling subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jeremy and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat mission.

Raeanne Cobb-Adams, a sophomore in Natural Resource Environmental Management and Hawaiian Studies, will pursue her interests in green issues relevant to Hawai'i in a project titled, "Hawai'i Ocean Color: Validation of Satellite Measurements of Chlorophyll in Hawaiian Ocean Waters." Raeanne will conduct field work to support her remote sensing mapping and analysis. Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Center for Microbial Oceanography and Harold Garbeil of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology are serving as mentors.

Aaron de Loach, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will pursue a project titled, "Satellite Tracking of Complex Eruptive Events at Kilauea During 2007-2008." Aaron will be using GOES data for near-real-time satellite monitoring of volcanic events under the mentorship of Drs. Andy Harris and Robert Wright, both of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Dennis Dugay, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue as lead engineer on the telecommunication subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Dennis and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting CubeSat satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Sara Fong, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on experiments to improve fuel cell efficiency. In her study titled, "Micro-Channel Methanol Steam Reformers for Fuel Cells in Space Applications" Sara will concentrate on heat transfer and system pressure measurements of methanol/water mixtures flow boiling in micrometer-sized channels.

Vance Hashimoto, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will conduct experiments to analyze the effects of gravity on flow boiling behavior in a two-phase, liquid and vapor, cooling system. Vance is working on this project "Two-Phase Micro-Channel Heat Sink Cooling Loop for Spacecraft Thermal Control" with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Reece Iwami, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is working as a CubeSat project leader investigating planar antennas and subsystems integration in a project titled "A Planar Antenna and Modular Subsystem Design for CubeSats." Serving as mentor is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Windell Jones, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the Kumu A'o CubeSat team as lead of the flight software/command and data handling subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Windell and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat.

Alex Le Bon, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be conducting computer simulations of satellite thermal systems for use on a U. H. micro-satellite. Alex's mentor is Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Zachary Lee-Ho, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working as lead project manager and systems engineer for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Zachary and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission.

Michael Menendez, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the structure subsystem and thermal control for the bus design and layout for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Michael and undergraduate teammates are working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission.

Lori Miyasaki, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on research to improve the mechanical properties and performance of ceramic composite materials for use in space structures. Lori's project is titled "Processing, Performance, and Characterization of Monolith Ceramic Nanocomposites from Preceramic Polymers."

Matthew Patterson, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue as lead of the power generation and distribution subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Matthew and undergraduate teammates are working to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Tyson Seto-Mook, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work on the command and data handling subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Tyson and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat.

Jordan Torres, a junior in electrical Engineering, will continue working on the power system with Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jordan and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission.

Alexis Zamora, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on satellite system integration and testing. The project, titled "Packaging and Integration of Systems in Picosatellites" emphasizes designs that insure all the main systems of the satellite are working in tandem and performing efficiently and optimally.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Denny (Kaniela) Dement, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, is pursuing a project titled, "Upgrading QUIRC for Use in the Infrared Imaging Survey." Working with mentor Klaus Hodapp of the Insitute for Astronomy in Hilo, Kaniela will work to upgrade the infrared camera (QUIRC) while gaining experience with cryo-mechanisms, motion control electronics, and vacuum technology.

Melissa Meiner, a senior in Geology and Marine Science, is continuing her tsunami research and education project to create a permanent Hawaiian tsunami exhibit at the Pacific Tsunami Museum in Hilo. The exhibit will incorporate invaluable imagery from Earth-observing satellites as well as historical data on causes and effects of tsunami to further illustrate the importance of risk assessment, preparedness, and management. Melissa's project, titled "Pacific Tsunami: Continuing Research and the Formation of a Museum Exhibit" is conducted under mentor Genevieve Cain of the Pacific Tsunami Museum.

David Trang, a senior in Astronomy, Geology, and Psychology, will work with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy on a project monitoring stars in the Orion Nebula using two robotic telescopes at Mauna Loa Observatory. The title of David's project is "Surveying Stellar Flares Using VYSOS."

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses have worked together and participated in ARLISS Competitions (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites).

 

 

2008 Undergraduate Interns

  • Windell Jones, U.H. Manoa, to the NASA Robotics Academy at Ames Research Center, California.

  • Jordan Olive, U.H. Hilo, to the NASA Robotics Academy at Ames Research Center, California.

  • Julian Yuen, U.H. Manoa, to the NASA Robotics Academy at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland.

  • Chester Lim, U.H. Manoa, to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California.

  • Crystal Whitehill, U.H. Manoa, to the Weather Station at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai.

 

2008 Summer Kauai Undergraduate Fellows

Five students at Kauai Community College received Fellowship Summer Awards to work at the Photonics Lab on the Kauai CC campus under the guidance of Dr. Francis Takahashi. The Fellows are Bradly WilcoxAngel HernandezMark GuiraoEric Fune, and Keelan Sakuda.

 

Spring 2007
Spring 2007 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2007 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

Spring 2007 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Alexander Ambard, a sophomore, will continue working on his project titled "Study of Fluvial Channels Around Olympus Mons Volcano, Mars" under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Alexander is building a database of THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) and MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data focused on an area southeast of Olympus Mons to study sites of potential water release, the distribution of water channels, and to estimate the volumes of water that could have carved the channels.

Michelle (Mikala) Bradley, a senior in Interdisciplinary Studies, will continue her work on "Bringing Mars Science to Hawai'i's Students: Making Science Culturally Relevant to Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders." Working with mentor, Dr. Barbara Bruno, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Michelle is developing a set of standards-based space science lessons relevant to Mars that focus on three main topics: water, volcanoes, and sustainable development. Michelle will continue visiting classrooms to test and refine the lessons, and she will develop a companion website with the lessons and additional resources. Mikala and her Fellowship mentor, Dr. Barbara Bruno, will be presenting a free teachers workshop covering their curriculum and companion board game on October 13, 2007.

Jennie Castillo, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, will work on the design of the orbital trajectory for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Jennie will work with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, and undergraduate teammates, to develop a mission that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

Dennis Dugay, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the satellite concept study and telecommunication subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Dennis and undergraduate teammates are responsible for developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Aukai Kent, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the satellite concept study and payload subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. The payload consists of four components: an imaging system, GPS unit, retro directive antenna, and health-monitoring software package. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Aukai and undergraduate teammates are also writing a design review document that incorporates all subsystem architecture, operation, cost, integration, and schedule requirements.

Kaipo Kent, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, will work on a self-monitoring, thermal control subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Kaipo and undergraduate teammates are developing a plan that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

Zachary Lee-Ho, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study, integration of subsystems, and spacecraft architecture as systems engineer for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Zachary and undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Michael Menendez, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on the structure subsystem for the bus design and layout for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Michael and his undergraduate teammates are also writing a design review document that incorporates all subsystem architecture, operation, cost, integration, and schedule requirements.

Matthew Patterson, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study and power subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Matthew and undergraduate teammates are responsible for developing a strategy to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Daniel Rogers, a sophomore in Physics, will continue to work with mentor, Dr. Eric Gaidos, of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on research concerning the formation environment of our Sun and Solar System. Daniel's focus shifted from analyzing photometric data of stars to the more fundamental question of how stars form. In his project titled, "The Environment and Distribution of Early Stellar Systems," Daniel is seeking to elucidate the origin of the Sun by using computer modeling techniques to simulate the formation, distribution, and composition of star clusters.

Kristian Sexton, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mento,r Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi, of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on developing a new design for dissipating heat from high-energy components and transferring heat within small satellites. This work is relevant to the UH Small-Satellite Programs including CubeSat and LEONIDAS. Kristian's project, titled "Bio-inspired Design of Thermal Systems for Small Satellites" will focus on numerical modeling of geometrical configurations based on dendritic structures in nature.

Lynette Shiroma, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on the attitude and control subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Lynette and undergraduate teammates are developing a plan that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

Tyler Tamashiro, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma, of the Department of Electrical Engineering on developing a dynamically reconfigurable small-satellite-network architecture. In his project, titled "Design and Test of a Picosatellite Network," Tyler is designing, implementing, and testing hardware and software for the communication network for a cluster of satellites in support of the UH Small-Satellite Programs including CubeSat and LEONIDAS.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Denny (Kaniela) Dement, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, will help develop software to detect and correct atmospheric dispersion of infrared spectral data obtained during telescopic searches from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Working under the mentorship of Dr. Randy Campbell of the W. M. Keck Observatory, Kaniela's project is titled "Creating a New DRP Module for OSIRIS." OSIRIS is the 'OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph' and DRP refers to the data reduction protocol that will be followed to correct for the dispersion of light by the atmosphere into its spectral components, which causes the data distortion.

 

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2007 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

  • Alexander Ambard, a sophomore, will continue working on his project titled "Study of Fluvial Channels Around Olympus Mons Volcano, Mars" under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Alexander is building a database of THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) and MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data focused on an area southeast of Olympus Mons to study sites of potential water release, the distribution of water channels, and to estimate the volumes of water that could have carved the channels.

  • Michelle (Mikala) Bradley, a senior in Interdisciplinary Studies, will continue her work on "Bringing Mars Science to Hawai'i's Students: Making Science Culturally Relevant to Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders." Working with mentor, Dr. Barbara Bruno, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Michelle is developing a set of standards-based space science lessons relevant to Mars that focus on three main topics: water, volcanoes, and sustainable development. Michelle will continue visiting classrooms to test and refine the lessons, and she will develop a companion website with the lessons and additional resources. Mikala and her Fellowship mentor, Dr. Barbara Bruno, will be presenting a free teachers workshop covering their curriculum and companion board game on October 13, 2007.

  • Jennie Castillo, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, will work on the design of the orbital trajectory for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Jennie will work with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, and undergraduate teammates, to develop a mission that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

  • Dennis Dugay, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the satellite concept study and telecommunication subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Dennis and undergraduate teammates are responsible for developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

  • Aukai Kent, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the satellite concept study and payload subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. The payload consists of four components: an imaging system, GPS unit, retro directive antenna, and health-monitoring software package. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Aukai and undergraduate teammates are also writing a design review document that incorporates all subsystem architecture, operation, cost, integration, and schedule requirements.

  • Kaipo Kent, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, will work on a self-monitoring, thermal control subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Kaipo and undergraduate teammates are developing a plan that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

  • Zachary Lee-Ho, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study, integration of subsystems, and spacecraft architecture as systems engineer for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Zachary and undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

  • Michael Menendez, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on the structure subsystem for the bus design and layout for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Michael and his undergraduate teammates are also writing a design review document that incorporates all subsystem architecture, operation, cost, integration, and schedule requirements.

  • Matthew Patterson, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study and power subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Matthew and undergraduate teammates are responsible for developing a strategy to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

  • Daniel Rogers, a sophomore in Physics, will continue to work with mentor, Dr. Eric Gaidos, of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on research concerning the formation environment of our Sun and Solar System. Daniel's focus shifted from analyzing photometric data of stars to the more fundamental question of how stars form. In his project titled, "The Environment and Distribution of Early Stellar Systems," Daniel is seeking to elucidate the origin of the Sun by using computer modeling techniques to simulate the formation, distribution, and composition of star clusters.

  • Kristian Sexton, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mento,r Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi, of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on developing a new design for dissipating heat from high-energy components and transferring heat within small satellites. This work is relevant to the UH Small-Satellite Programs including CubeSat and LEONIDAS. Kristian's project, titled "Bio-inspired Design of Thermal Systems for Small Satellites" will focus on numerical modeling of geometrical configurations based on dendritic structures in nature.

  • Lynette Shiroma, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on the attitude and control subsystem for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Lynette and undergraduate teammates are developing a plan that enables Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, which will serve as a testbed for experiments and science technology developments.

  • Tyler Tamashiro, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma, of the Department of Electrical Engineering on developing a dynamically reconfigurable small-satellite-network architecture. In his project, titled "Design and Test of a Picosatellite Network," Tyler is designing, implementing, and testing hardware and software for the communication network for a cluster of satellites in support of the UH Small-Satellite Programs including CubeSat and LEONIDAS.

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

  • Denny (Kaniela) Dement, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, will help develop software to detect and correct atmospheric dispersion of infrared spectral data obtained during telescopic searches from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Working under the mentorship of Dr. Randy Campbell of the W. M. Keck Observatory, Kaniela's project is titled "Creating a New DRP Module for OSIRIS." OSIRIS is the 'OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph' and DRP refers to the data reduction protocol that will be followed to correct for the dispersion of light by the atmosphere into its spectral components, which causes the data distortion.

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses have worked together and participated in the September 2006 ARLISS Competition (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada.

  • Honolulu Community College CanSat Fellows

    The CanSat team members at HCC are: Robert Allen, Reynaldo Tabilin, Mark Dalere, Andrew Southiphong, and Nathan Tanoue. Building on their experiences gained at the 2006 ARLISS competition, the team is designing and fabricating components of a new satellite to launch at the 3rd annual CanSat Competition in Texas in June, 2007. The team is busy developing the satellite's enclosure, electronics interfaces, microcontroller software, telemetry system, steerable parachute, and landing system. Mentors working with the HCC team are Vern Takebayashi, Dallas Shiroma, Paul Jacoby, Michael Castell, Helen Rapozo, and Ron Takata.

  • Windward Community College CanSat Fellows

    The CanSat team members at WCC are: Damion Rosbrugh, Premo Ames, William Beggs, Robert Forbus, Travis Osurman, and Joleen Iwaniec. The team is continuing its efforts to develop a new satellite to launch at the 2007 ARLISS Competition (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada in September. They have completed the initial design phase and are experimenting with weight distributions and different shapes and for the craft, including a fixed-wing lifting body and parasail. Electronics and systems fabrication and testing will continue through the summer. Mentors working with the WCC team are Jake Hudson and Joseph Ciotti.

  •  Kapiolani Community College CanSat Fellows

    The CanSat "Team Daedalus" members at KCC are: Eric Lee, Sae Yoon, Jeremy Chan, and Jimyleah Castro. They are currently working on a project dubbed "Icarus" to develop the electronics for a low-power air-to-ground telemetry system. The mentor working with the KCC team is John Rand.

Spring 2006
Spring 2006 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2006 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

Spring 2006 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Vann Bennett, a junior in Mathematics, will work with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Planning of Keplerian Orbits: Application to Periodic Trajectories." Vann's work will emphasize the application of geometric optimal control theory to analyze planar orbit transfers for satellites or spacecraft involving minimal flight time.

William Carrier, a senior in Physics, will focus his attention on the formation mechanism of a super greenhouse gas. Continuing a collaboration with mentor Dr. Ralf Kaiser of the Department of Chemistry, William's new laboratory research will address the recombination of radicals from irradiated gas samples of SF6 and CF4 on low-temperature icy aerosol particles in his project titled, "Mechanistical Studies on the Formation of SF5CF3."

Dylan Ichikawa, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work on satellite-to-ground communications with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Dylan will be responsible for the design and construction of a UHF ground station at UH Manoa to support direct uplink and downlink to the UH CubeSat, set for launch in 2006, and other satellites. Dylan's project is titled "A Collaborative, Networked Ground Station for CubeSat Tracking and Communication."

Kin Wai Leung, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Beei-Huan Chao of the Department of Mechanical Engineering to study the burning and extinction of diffusion flames in space through analytical and numerical modeling. Kin Wai's project is titled "A Theoretical Investigation of the Kinetic and Radiative Extinction of Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity."

Mary Liang, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will be involved with a project whose goals of detecting life in extreme environments are in support of astrobiology research. In this project titled "Intelligent Sensor Networks for Extreme Environments" Mary's responsibilities center on the circuit design of small electromechanical sensors which will be used to measure biomarkers. Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Sciences serves as mentor.

Shelly Migita, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue her work with mentor, Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project titled, "Effects of Low Reynolds Numbers on the Aerodynamics of Micro-Air Vehicles." Shelly's interests in aeronautics are well suited for her study of computational fluid dynamics models of different wing geometries to better understand the aerodynamics of small, unpiloted aerial vehicles.

Carolyn Parcheta, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics, will continue to study flow velocities and volume fluxes for lava flows on Olympus Mons, Mars. Carolyn is using digital image processing and analytical techniques with Mars Orbiter Camera data and THEMIS thermal data in her project, titled "Estimating Effusion Rates for Olympus Mons, Mars." Dr. Sarah Fagents and Dr. Barbara Bruno, both of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, are serving as mentors.

Lisa Tatsumi, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute of Astronomy on a project titled, "Temporal Changes in Martian Slope Streaks." Lisa will investigate the rates of formation and fading of slope streaks as well as the physical characteristics of newly formed steaks based on Viking Orbiter images and new high-resolution images from the Mars Orbiter Camera.

Monte Watanabe, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will be involved in the design and fabrication of the antenna necessary for satellite-to-Earth communications for CubeSats as well as inter-satellite communications. Monte's project titled, "Planar Antennas for CubeSat Applications" is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering. Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering serves as project mentor.

Faye Yuen, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will be involved with a project with overall goals of detecting life in extreme environments in support of astrobiology research, under the mentorship of Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Sciences. Faye will work on hardware and power requirements for a network of small electromechanical sensors designed to measure biomarkers in a project titled, "Intelligent Sensor Networks for Extreme Environments."

 

LEONIDAS Small Satellite Project Fellows:

  • Dennis Dugay, U.H. Manoa

  • Aukai Kent, U.H. Manoa

  • Zachary Lee-Ho, U.H. Manoa

  • Matthew Patterson, U.H. Manoa

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Walter (Eli) Bressert, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Michael West of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project utilizing statistical models with Hubble Space Telescope data of globular clusters. Eli's project, titled "Reconstruction of the Evolution of Galaxies using the extended Press-Schechter Model with Globular Clusters" will provide quantitative constraints on the merger histories of individual galaxies.

Robert Knight, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, will work with mentor Dr. Albert Conrad of the W. M. Keck Observatory on a project titled, "Improving the Deconvolution Method for Asteroid Images." Working with images of asteroids taken with Keck II cameras and image processing software, Robert's work will help to improve the digital image quality for better analysis of the physical and chromatic structure of asteroids.

Sarah Knights, a senior in Astronomy, will continue a collaboration with mentor Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy on a new project titled, "The Variability of Pre-Main Sequence Stars in Lambda Orionis." Using the new Variable Young Stellar Objects Survey (VYSOS) telescope at Mauna Loa Observatory, Sarah's research will enable improved understanding of evolution and variability of star forming regions.

Luke Linhoff, a junior in Biology, will work with mentor Dr. Jason Turner of the Department of Marine Science to investigate the growth and survival of shrimp in small closed ecosystems and to determine how laboratory results can be applied to experimental life support systems in space. The title of Luke's project is "Analysis of Halocaridina rubra in an Endogenously Controlled Closed Ecosystem."

 

CanSat Fellows:

  • Robert C. Allen, Honolulu Community College.

  • Doyle Brooks, Windward Community College.

  • Justin J. Carland, Kapiolani Community College.

  • Melodee Ann K. Ferreira, Honolulu Community College.

  • Blake T. Inouye, Honolulu Community College.

  • Layne H. Katsumoto, Honolulu Community College.

  • Indar P. Lange, Kapiolani Community College.

  • Eric S. Lee, Leeward Community College.

  • Damion R. Rosbrugh, Windward Community College.

  • Sae J. Yoon, Kapiolani Community College.

 

 

2006 JPL Summer Undergraduate Interns 

  • William Ahue, U.H. Manoa

  • Dennis Dugay, U.H. Manoa

  • Dylan Sweeney, U.H. Manoa

  • Lance Yoneshige, U.H. Manoa

 

 

Spring 2006 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Reece Iwami, a freshman in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "Tracking Software for Student Satellites." As part of ground station operations, Reece will work with communications software for real-time analysis of satellite orbits. This project is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering.

Tyler Tamashiro, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "Intersatellite Communication Network for Picosatellite Clusters." Tyler is studying various networking methods and applications for a cluster of picosatellites in support of the UH Small-Satellite Program.

 

Community Colleges:

Michael Cheng, Kapiolani Community College. Project title: "Cataloging Near Earth Objects and Messier Objects."

Jason Poe, Kapiolani Community College. Project title: "A Quantum Basis for Biology: Coherent Excitation of Electric Vibrations in Biological Membranes using Non-Thermal, Non-Ionizing Electro-Magnetic Fields."

Victoria Sensano, Maui Community College. Project title: "High Performance Computing."

Nicholas Tyra, Maui Community College. Project title: "Adaptive Optics."

Spring 2005
Spring 2005 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2005 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2005 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Kristine Ayson, a senior in Biology and Physics, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Karen Meech of the Institute for Astronomy on a project utilizing a large database of comet images. Kristine's project, titled "The Effects of Aging on the Morphology of the Dust Comae of Periodic and Non-periodic Comets with Regards to the Formation of Jets" includes the collection and processing of images from the UH 2.2 meter telescope at Mauna Kea.

Matthew Bell, a senior in Anthropology, will work with mentor Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology on remote sensing techniques applied to archaeology and historic preservation. Matthew's project, titled "Archaeology on Easter Island" will emphasize the use of QuickBird satellite imagery and GIS mapping techniques to document monumental ceremonial platforms on Rapa Nui. Matthew's work will also include the development and field testing of a kite aerial photography rig.

Bridget Cantu, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is using theoretical analyses to study the effects of high-frequency vibrations and micro-convection on the motion of suspended crystals in microgravity environments. Bridget's project, titled "Effects of g-jitter on the Motion of Particle Seeds for Microgravity Crystal Growth Applications," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

William Carrier, a freshman in Physics, will perform experiments under the guidance of his mentor, Dr. Ralf Kaiser of the Department of Chemistry, to characterize infrared spectra of germanium-carrying molecules in low temperature ices. His project titled, "Chemistry of Germane and Methane in the Atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn," will aid our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of giant gas planets, and the data will be useful for future astronomical searches with infrared spectroscopy.

David Gremminger, a junior in Geology & Geophysics, will use images from Viking Orbiter and Mars Orbiter Camera to study the surface of Mars; in particular, the physical characteristics and rates of formation and fading of slope streaks. David's project, titled "Decadal Variability in Slope Streak Activity on Mars" will be conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy.

Michele Harman, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will continue to use remote sensing data from the IKONOS satellite, GIS, and field observations to map native and invasive plants in the Makaha Valley watershed. Working with mentor Dr. Tomoaki Miura of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Michele seeks to understand the effects of invasive species on biodiversity and ecosystems. The project is titled "Analyzing the Distribution and Impact of Invasive Species in Makaha Valley, O'ahu with Remote Sensing."

Kaihoolulu Rickard, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Lloyd French of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, on a national student satellite mission known as the Magnetic Field Investigation of Mars by Interaction Consortia. Kaihoolulu will focus mainly on the C programming for two mission subsystems: communications and command & data handling.

Jasen Kaya, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue to pursue a project titled "Effects of Slip Condition on the Aerodynamics of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles." Working with mentor Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jasen is using computational fluid dynamics tools to investigate the forces and moments acting on the vehicles at high altitudes.

David Narahara, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue his project titled, "Processing, Performance, and Characterization of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites with Nanoparticles" with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. David seeks to understand how the addition of nanoparticles may improve the mechanical performance of ceramic composites used in high temperature jet-engine or space hardware components.

Gabriel Wofford, a junior in Global Environmental Science, will conduct a survey of stone mulch deposits on Rapa Nui using QuickBird satellite imagery. Gabriel's project, titled "Using High-Resolution Satellite Imagery to Document Prehistoric Agriculture on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)" includes image analysis and GIS spatial mapping. Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology will serve as mentor.

 

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Sarah Knights, a junior in Astronomy, will pursue a project using Hubble Space Telescope data to analyze the formation and dynamics of young binary star systems. Sarah's project, titled "Determining the Separation Distribution of Young Binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster" will also include observing time at the UH 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea. Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy is serving as mentor for this research.

Amanda Leonard, a senior in Geology, will continue to work with mentor Drs. Jene Michaud and Ken Hon of the Department of Geology to create a new illustrated brochure and companion website on the natural history of Mauna Kea Volcano. Her project, titled "Educational Outreach for Mauna Kea Astronomy" is designed to give the public a better understanding of the natural history, astronomical discoveries, and cultural significance of Mauna Kea.

 

 

Spring 2005 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Bessie Tran, a sophomore in Civil and Environmental Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Gregor Fischer of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering to learn about environmental conditions on Mars and aspects of structural and material concepts needed to design and build a shelter on Mars.

 

 Kapiolani Community College:

Eric Lee, a sophomore in Pre-Electrical Engineering, will help develop and construct a telemetry system to acquire data on spatial position, temperature, humidity, and wind velocity from an airborne platform to a ground-based receiver. He will also design a graphical user interface for CANSAT researchers. Eric's project, titled "Air to Ground Telemetry Acquisition, Analysis and Presentation Techniques" will be conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. John Rand of the Mathematics and Science Department.

Justin Carland, a sophomore in Pre-Electrical Engineering, will work on a project titled "A Tethered Airborne Platform for CANSAT Testing" with mentor Dr. John Rand of the Mathematics and Science Department. Justin will help design and construct a stable, tethered airborne platform using a reusable gas balloon. This balloon will be used as a test bed by the CANSAT program at KCC for remote sensing, position sensing and telemetry evaluation.

Spring 2004
Spring 2004 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2004 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2004 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Blaine Murakami, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on satellite-to-satellite communication techniques. Blaine's project, titled "Retrodirective Antenna Array Design for CubeSat Applications and CubeSat Program Management" will emphasize simulation and design of the experimental antenna arrays that serve as the satellite payload. In addition to his technical responsibilities, Blaine serves as Program Engineer leading the 30+ students on the UH CubeSat/NanoSat Program.

Josh Nagashima, a senior in Chemistry will work with mentor Dr. Craig Jensen of the Department of Chemistry researching "Hydrogen Fuel Storage-Metal Hydrides." Josh's work will help develop improved hydrogen cycling capacities of metal hydrides, which could ultimately lead to an improvement of cost and performance of energy storage in spacecraft.

Jennifer Olson, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will use continue her study of remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently orbiting Earth to study active volcanoes. Jennifer's project, titled "Monitoring Persistent Lava Lakes from Space," is being conducted under mentors Dr. Luke Flynn and Dr. Andy Harris of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Jennifer's work will contribute to our understanding of the mass flux of lava lakes on Mount Erebus, Antarctica and Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia.

Johnny Saucedo, a senior in Information and Computer Science, will use his programming skills to contribute to comet research and the broader field of astrobiology by designing and implementing a web interface in his project, titled "Deep Impact Database." NASA's Deep Impact mission will explore the pristine interior of a comet by crashing an autonomous spacecraft into the comet to excavate a large impact crater. Johnny's efforts will contribute to the best access of the mission's data. Mentor for this project is Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Science.

Alina Stauffer, a senior in Mathematics, will be working with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Optimizing Orbital Transfers." Alina's work will emphasize the use of differential geometry and numerical simulations visualized in 3D to solve how to transfer satellites or spacecraft from one orbit to another in the shortest time.

Kristina Wong, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will embark on an interdisciplinary research project involving physics, engineering, and materials science. Kristina's project, titled "Study of Micro- and Nano-cracks in Fatigued Advanced Materials" is being conducted under mentor Dr. Murli Manghnani of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. She will use a variety of advanced microscopes in her study of the elastic properties of ceramic fiber-reinforced composite materials and ceramic sensors that are important in the building of space vehicles.

Lance Yoneshige, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue his work on structural dynamics, vibration, and thermal stress analyses with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Lance's project, "Design, Analysis, Manufacture, and Test of the Structural Housing of the University of Hawai`i NanoSat," is part of a larger research program involving Electrical, Civil, and Mechanical Engineering students and mentors. As leader of the Mechanical Structures and Analysis team, Lance will help design the NanoSat structure with space qualified materials.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Heather Chang, a senior in Geography, will work with mentor Dr. Rebecca Ostertag of the Department of Biology on a remote sensing project using IKONOS and/or Landsat data to create a land use map in her project titled "Mapping Remnant Lowland Wet Forests in Hawai'i in Relation to Human Impacts." This project will test hypotheses about the abundance and dominance of native vs. non-native species in relation to urbanization and agricultural practices on the island of Hawai'i.

Anna Moore, a junior in Geography, will work with mentor Dr. Barbara Gibson of the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies on a project using Geographic Information Systems to analyze lichen morphology in relation to its distribution over different elevations and growing surfaces. Anna's project, titled "Environmental Constraints that Govern Spatial Distribution of Stereocaulon vulcani on Hawai'i Island" will document the growing habits of this primitive plant that shows tolerance to environmental extremes, which may prove beneficial to future astrobiology research.

 

Spring 2004 Undergraduate Traineeships

  Kapiolani Community College:

Jon Samaniego, a freshman in Radiology, will continue to gain practical experience in cardiovascular research during his traineeship project titled "The Effect of Gravitationally Induced Stress on Cardiovascular Variability." Jon is interested in the heart's response to stress when the body changes positions. Dr. John Rand of the Mathematics and Science Department will serve as mentor on this project. This study has implications for astronaut health during long-term microgravity exposure.

 

Leeward Community College:

Brandon Sato and Gemma Spillner will work with mentor Dr. Kakkala Mohanan of the Mathematics and Science Department on a traineeship project titled "Spectral Characterization of Short Period Variable Stars using CCD Cameras and a Grating Spectrometer." Their project will allow them to become familiar with the technologies associated with telescopes, CCD cameras, and spectrometer that enable astronomical research.

Spring 2003
Spring 2003 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2003 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2003 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Clyde Campos, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue his work with mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a rocket project for placing 10-kg payloads into Earth orbit. Clyde's project, titled "Dedicated Orbital Rocket for Small Payloads (DORSP)" emphasizes principles of rocket propulsion and orbital dynamics. Clyde hopes his research will help show the benefits of new, efficient, and smaller-scale rockets for use with small payloads.

Donielle Chittenden, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is continuing her evaluation of remote sensing data of different spatial resolutions to differentiate pahoehoe from a`a lava flows. She has focused on data and field work in Hawai`i and will now apply her ideas of resolution limits to satellite images of volcanic terrain on Mars. Donielle's project, titled "Determining the Spatial Resolution Range: A Comparison of the Lava Flows on Mauna Loa to those of Elysium Mons through Remote Sensing," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Scott Rowland of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Seth Kamemoto, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is continuing work on a robot vision project titled, "Visual Sensing in Autonomous Robots." Under the direction of mentor Dr. Tep Dobry of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Seth is designing hardware and software to optimize the path taken by an autonomous robot through a maze. This research benefits the space industry's need for unpiloted or robotic systems that can function in remote, extreme environments.

Jennifer Kawata, a junior in Global Environmental Science, will work on a remote sensing project titled, "Analysis of the Late-Stage Intra-Caldera Activity of Arsia Mons Volcano, Mars." Under the direction of mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jennifer will combine analyses of satellite images and field work on Kilauea with a detailed geologic and topographic study of Arsia Mons caldera.

Conred Maddox, a junior majoring in Philosophy and English, will continue working on a project, titled "Model Rocketry in the High School Classroom" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Jeff Taylor of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Lessons in the curriculum will be aligned with National and Hawai`i State Educational Standards and will involve physical sciences, engineering concepts, and computer technology. Conred is collaborating with local high schools and the Aerospace Education Lab at Windward Community College.

Alex Niemi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with a microgravity simulator, using rotary vessels to study heat flux for boiling in space. His work, titled "Determination of the Onset of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions," is being performed under mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Alex's project compliments his interests in the broad field of fluid mechanics and its application in the aerospace industry.

Karl Santa, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with composite and piezoelectric materials with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Karl's project, "Design, Analysis, and Optimization of a Circular Smart Composite Plate," is part of a larger research program, including former Space Grant Fellows, to design, test, and monitor structural positioning performance of metals for intelligent aeronautical and aerospace structures.

Kristen Teranishi, a junior in Zoology, will continue work on her project, titled "A New Model for Studying the Primary Effects of Cooling Stress on the Ability of Organisms to Enter into Cryobiosis and Ultimately Anhydrobiosis." Kristen's project with nematodes is being performed under the guidance of mentor Dr. Christopher Womersley of the Department of Zoology. This research on metabolic adaptations under low-temperature stress has important implications in the broader context of bioastronomy and life in extreme environments.

Adam Vorsino, a a junior in Biology, will continue work on his project titled, "Manipulation of a New Model for Anhydrobiotic Survival: The Effect of Myoinositol and Trehalose on Enhancing the Ability to Survive in a State of Suspended Animation." Adam aims to study the effects of certain sugars to enhance the ability of organisms, in this case nematodes, to enter into prolonged suspended animation induced by dehydration. The work has implications for research into the stability of dry biological systems, organisms, and foodstuff during extended space flights. Dr. Christopher Womersley of the Department of Zoology is serving as mentor for this research.

 

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Steven Clegg, a junior in Geology, will use a new ultraviolet correlation spectrometer called FLYSPEC at the western edge of the Kilauea Caldera. Steven's project, titled "SO2 Emission Rates of Kilauea Caldera Using the New FLYSPEC Instrument" will be performed under mentor Dr. Keith Horton of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. The results of this work will benefit ground-truth correlations for remote sensing data of volcanic SO2 emissions.

 

 

Spring 2003 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Mary Miura, a senior in Education-Secondary Science, will work under the guidance of mentor Dr. E. Barbara Klemm of the College of Education's Curriculum Studies Department on a project titled, "Web-based Science Curriculum." Mary will develop a WebQuest unit on Satellite Ocean Color to help middle and high school students learn about using NASA remote sensing data to detect changes in photosynthetic activity of the oceans.

 

 Kapiolani Community College:

Jon Samaniego, a freshman in Radiology, will work under the guidance of mentor Dr. John Rand of the Math and Science Department on a project titled, "The Effect of Gravitationally Induced Stress on Cardiovascular Variability." Jon will study the heart's response to physiological stress and determine the autonomic nervous system's response to different body positions with respect to gravity. This study has implications for astronaut health during long-term microgravity exposure.

Spring 2002
Spring 2002 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2002 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2002 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jason Akagi, a senior in Electrical Engineering will continue experiments under the guidance of mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled "Remote Robotic Control Via Internet Protocol."

Tai Blechta, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will continue working with mentor, Dr. Lloyd Hihara of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a research project titled "Ambient Temperature Cure Glass Coatings."

Michael Hall, a senior in Electrical Engineering will continue his project titled "Tunable External-Cavity Diode Laser with Applications to Atmospheric DIAL Measurements" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Audra Bullock of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Dennis Higashiguchi, a senior in Entomology will continue working with mentor Dr. Claudia Husseneder of the Department of Entomology on the project titled "The Gut Flora of the Formosan Subterranean Termite as a Model of an Exotic Ecosystem."

Jonathan Iloreta, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will continue development of mathematical models with mentor Dr. Beei-Huan Chao of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project titled "Effects of Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Radiation on the Sooting Behavior of Spherical Diffusion Flames."

Aaron Ohta, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work under the guidance of mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled "CubeSat: Student Projects in Satellite Technology."

Lynnette Ramirez, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on her project titled "Characterization of Particle Motion in a Microgravity Simulator for Biomedical Applications."

Randy Sakagawa, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will continue working on his project titled "Integration of Active Composite Struts and Panels into an Adaptive Platform for Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning" with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Cory Soon, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on the project titled "Design, Analysis, Manufacture, and Testing of Active Composite Panel Prototypes with Embedded Sensors/Actuators and Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning Capabilities."

Michael Tamamoto, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work under the guidance of mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled "CubeSat: Student Projects in Satellite Technology."

 

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Meredith Acly, a senior in Marine Science will work with mentor, Dr. Michael Parsons of the Department of Marine Science, on a project titled "Assessing the Affects of Excess Nutrients due to Non-point Source Pollution on Phytoplankton Production Levels in Hilo Bay, Hawaii using ASTER and In Situ Data."

Jennifer Halsted, a senior in Astronomy, will continue her project titled "'Starpile' in Abell 545" under the direction of mentor Dr. Michael West of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Anthony Matulonis, a senior in Astronomy, will work with mentor Dr. Richard Crowe of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project titled "Site Testing of Mauna Kea and Hale Pohaku."

Spring 2000
Spring 2000 Undergraduate Participants

 

Spring 2001
Spring 2001 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 2001 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2001 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and the Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects. Students at the highest level of funding at the Community College are included in this description.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Randall Imaoka who is a junior in Mechanical Engineering will perform experiments under the guidance of his mentor, Dr. Carlos Coimbra, to help understand how particles move in viscous fluids. His project titled, "Scale-up Study of Viscous Particle Motion under Microgravity Conditions," will be used to aid in the design of experiments on the International Space Station. Understanding how particles move in fluids in microgravity environments is necessary to design safe and efficient liquid containers for use in space.

Michael Lurvey, a junior in International Business, will continue his work on a project titled, "Drop Deployable Instrument Package," under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Kent Bridges, of the Department of Botany. He is designing and testing a robust instrument system to collect temperature and humidity measurements that can withstand remote deployment to remote locations.

Ferdinand Oberle is a junior in Geology and Geophysics who is working with mentor, Dr. Scott Rowland, on a project entitled, "Iron-rich Sahara Sand Storms." He will use satellite imagery and remote sensing to study how dust plumes from the Sahara may trigger phytoplankton blooms in the Atlantic Ocean.

Scott Sufak, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue his work on a project titled, "Development of an Autonomous Vehicle Health Monitoring System," under the direction of mentor, Dr. Song Choi. of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Scott is designing and fabricating a fault detection system to monitor pressure, moisture, and temperature. This research benefits the space industry's need for early warning systems on vehicles, especially unpiloted or robotic systems, working in extreme environments.

Reid Takamiya, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue to work on the simultaneous precision positioning and axial vibration suppression capabilities of intelligent-composite active struts. His work titled, "Design, Manufacture, and Testing of a Coarse/Fine Active Composite Strut Prototype with Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning," is performed under his mentor, Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Melanie Yamauchi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is working on composite and piezoelectric materials with mentor, Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad, of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Her project titled, "Design, Manufacture, and Testing of an Active Composite Panel Prototype with Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning," is part of a larger research program, including former Space Grant Fellows, to test and monitor structural positioning performance of metals for intelligent aeronautical and aerospace structures.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Kevin Sweeney, a junior in Physics, is continuing his project to develop a computer program to model the distribution of very faint astronomical objects in the Coma Cluster. With mentor, Dr. Michael West, of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kevin aims to use the model to help establish that these objects are intergalactic globular clusters. The title of his project is "Intracluster Globular Clusters in the Coma Cluster of Galaxies."

Jeffrey P. Taylor, a junior in Marine Science, is continuing his project titled "The Effects of Volcanic Fog on 'SeaWiFS' Imagery in the Lee of Hawai`i." Jeffrey is investigating how atmospheric parameters affect satellite data acquisition of chlorophyll concentrations in eddies off the Big Island. His project includes data from the SeaWiFS ocean color sensor, drifter buoy, and shipboard samples. Mentor for this project is Dr. Robert Bidigare of the Oceanography Department at U. H. Manoa.

 

Honolulu Community College:

Ronald Kim is a freshman who will work with mentor, Dr. Robert Takamine, in the Aeronautics Department on a project entitled, "Micro Air Vehicle Robotics." He will develop a robotic system to allow a slow-flying micro air vehicle to attach itself to a solid surface.

Leigh Lasher, a sophomore in Liberal Arts, will work with mentor, Dr. Luke Flynn at U. H. Manoa on a project in remote sensing of volcanoes that aims to reduce volcanic hazards. She will focus on three volcanoes in Guatemala.

Sheldon Saito is a sophomore who will work with mentor, Dr. Vern Takebayashi, on a computer programming project to develop a program that can be used by students at Kaneohe Elementary School to allow them to learn about space on the internet.

 

Kapiolani Community College:

Conred Maddox Jr. is a sophomore who will work with his mentor, Dr. Jake Hudson, in the Math & Science Department to develop a model rocket program, which could be used in high school science courses.

 

 

Spring 2001 Undergraduate Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Spring of 2001 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend of $1,000 per semester and up to $250 per semester for supplies.

 

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Aaron Ohta is a sophomore who will work with his mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma, in Electrical Engineering to gain research training in wireless communications. Better communications are critical for extraterrestrial exploration. The potential of Martian rovers, for example, could be greatly increased by improving the communication systems with their parent spacecraft.

Michael Tamamoto is also a sophomore who will work as a trainee under mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma, to gain experience in wireless communications. He will concentrate on wireless receivers and fellow trainee, Aaron Ohta, will concentrate on wireless transmitters.

Fall 2009
Fall 2009 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2009 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2009 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa.

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa:

Michael Andonian, a senior in Mathematics will bring his mathematical skills to bear on the issues of control theory developed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and how they can be applied to robots in space, specifically vehicles that will someday explore the oceans under the icy crust of Europa, Jupiter's moon. Michael will work on his project titled, "Guidance and Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles" with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics.

Jason Axelson, a senior in Electrical Engineering will continue his work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on hardware and software issues for small satellites. With his project titled "Design of a CubeSat Payload Interface" Jason's goal is to create a modular interface to support CubeSat payloads in an effort to systematize development efforts and meet budget constraints.

Yu Ming Cai, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will expand on a project he began as a Space Grant Trainee (Spring, 2009) on thermal modeling and analyses relevant to all small satellite projects. Yu Ming is using advanced simulation tools during his project titled "Analysis and Design of the Thermal Control Sub-System of LEO-1." Serving as mentor is Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Samantha Jacob, a sophomore in Physics will work with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy on a project titled "Are Martian Slope Streaks Triggered by Dust Devils?" Samantha will work with orbital remote sensing images and learn digital imaging processing techniques specifically to identify dust devil tracks and slope steaks, to document the timing of their appearance, and try to determine cause/effect relationships.

Windell Jones is a senior in Mechanical Engineering with Space Grant Fellowship (2007-2008) and NASA Ames Robotics Academy (Summer 2008) experience. Windell will be working on attitude correction and determination for small satellites in a project titled, "The Design of Simple Attitude Control for a Cube Satellite." Serving as mentor is Dr. Amit Sanyal of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Christina King, a junior in Art, will continue working with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute for Astronomy researching the characteristics and timing of the formation of dark streaks on slopes on the Martian surface. In her project titled, "Seasonality of Slope Streak Formation," Christina is using advanced processing and analysis techniques on geological remote sensing data to further test hypotheses of formation mechanisms, seasonal dependence, and localized streak activity.

Scott Lee, a junior in Electrical Engineering plans to design, fabricate, and test a thermoelectric generator circuit for improved efficiency in storing and dissipating electricity. Scott's project titled, "Renewable Energy Using Thermoelectric Devices" has important applications for space components. Serving as mentor is Dr. Aaron Ohta of the Department of Electrical Engineering, himself a former Hawai‘i Space Grant Fellow (2002) and Trainee (2001).

Bao Jun Lei, a senior in Electrical Engineering will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on nanosatellite technology. With his project titled "Design of Electrical Power Subsystem using the CubeSat Stackable Interface" Bao will plan, create, and test a modular design that can be integrated within any type of CubeSat payload for optimum performance.

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses work together and participate in ARLISS Competitions (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada. Community college students have benefited from the mentorship of professors at Honolulu CC and Windward CC, and engineers from HECO and industry affiliates.

 

Kapi'olani Community College:

Kendra Dilcher is working with mentor Dr. John Rand, Space Grant Associate Director at Kapiolani Community College to develop mechanical structures, robust electronics, and software for the 2010 CanSat competition.

 

Windward Community College:

Premitivo Ames II, Todd Esposito, Joleen Iwaniec, Patrick Lancaster, and Jasmine Maru are working with mentors Joe Ciotti, Jake Hudson, and Helen Rapozo, on "Holomua--The Way Forward: Continuing ARLISS Efforts." Their current efforts include redesign of the electronics subsystem to separate navigation/steering and parafoil deployment from data collection. A redesigned payload module will increase the CanSat's volume capcity and permit directional control throughout the initial free-fall phase. Parafoil and module prototype construction are complete.

 

 

Fall 2009 Undergraduate Traineeships

Maui Community College:

Lauren Elder, Kevin Roy, and Norman Tong, are working on different aspects of a wide-scope project, "Astrometry and Photometry of Asteroids and Variable Stars - Planning, Scheduling, and Collecting Data Using Remotely Operated Telescopes in New Mexico and Australia." Serving as mentor is Dr. John Pye, professor of Astronomy and Oceanography, and Space Grant Associate Director at Maui Community College.

 

Summer 2009 Undergraduate Programs

Hawai‘i Space Grant supported two undergraduates, Daniel Hong and Jordan Olive, to attend the NASA Ames Robotics Academy at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California from June 8 to August 14, 2009. Hawai‘i Space Grant supported Sophie Milam to attend the NASA Ames Academy for Space Exploration.

Hawai‘i Space Grant supported 11 summer interns from the Kaua‘i Community College at local high-tech companies. Mark Guirao and Brycen Nakashima worked at Manu Kai Optics, LLC at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). Angel Hernandez and Ryan Parangao worked at Trex Hawaii, LLC at PMRF. Crystal Whitehill worked at ITT Corp. at PMRF, continuing her internship from Summer 2008. Eric Fune, Keelan Sakuda, Keonimana Shigematsu and Geoffrey Tran worked for the U.S. Navy Communications Dept. at PMRF. Harold Shimono worked at Oceanit Labs, Inc. Thad Fuji worked at Kaua‘i Island Utility Cooperative.

Six undergraduates, Kelan Adachi, Taylor Alfiler, John Crescenzi, Kolby Javinar, Victor Rundbaken, and John Vento, completed Summer Fellowships at Kaua‘i Community College with mentor Dr. Matthew Cochran.

Fall 2008
Fall 2008 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2008 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2008 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jessica Ayau, a junior in Education, will be continuing her project titled, "Identification and Mapping of Hawaiian Coral Reefs Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing." Jessica's study area is off the coast of O'ahu and she is combining ocean field work with a supervised-classification mapping technique on airborne remote sensing data. Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Center for Microbial Oceanography and Harold Garbeil of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology are serving as mentors.

Amy Blas, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work as project manager and co-lead for the telecommunication subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Amy and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting CubeSat satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Jeremy Chan, a senior in Electrical Engineering, who previously worked on the command and data handling subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team will take over as the project systems engineer. He will also oversee improvements to the firmware for the satellite flight model. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jeremy and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat mission.

Aaron de Loach, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue his project titled, "Satellite Tracking of Complex Eruptive Events at Kilauea During 2007-2008." Aaron is using GOES data for near-real-time satellite monitoring of volcanic events and has already categorized 13,000 images. Drs. Robert Wright and Andy Harris, both of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, are serving as mentors.

Jeffrey Guzman, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with mentor Dr. Weilin Qu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on experiments to improve spacecraft thermal control. In his study titled, "Two-phase Micro-Channel Heat Sink Cooling Loop" Jeffrey will concentrate on system assembly and determining the effects of gravity on the thermal performance of the cooling loop.

Reece Iwami, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working as a CubeSat project leader and has designed a planar inverted F antenna. He is also investigating subsystems integration in his project titled "A Planar Antenna and Modular Subsystem Design for CubeSats." Serving as mentor is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Windell Jones, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the Kumu A'o CubeSat team working on the attitude control systems and share board. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Windell and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat. Windell was also a 2008 Summer Intern at the NASA Robotics Academy at Ames Research Center, California.

Kaveh Khosroshahi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will put his skills to work for space technology in his project titled, "Mechanical Performance and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Unidirectional Carbon Fiber Tows/Tapes in Hierarchical Nanocomposites for Space Applications." Serving as mentor is Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Erin Miller, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will work with mentor Dr. Cecily Wolfe of the Department of Geology and Geophysics to study seismic data of Hawaiian volcanoes to help explain geologic behavior on other planetary bodies. Erin's project is titled "Magmatism and Faulting at Kilauea Volcano: An Analog to Tharsis Volcanoes on Mars."

Whitney Reyes, a junior in Botany, will pursue her interests in documenting distribution and health of land cover in Hawai'i in a project titled, "Mapping and Analysis of Vegetation Diversity Using Remote Sensing." Whitney will conduct field work to support her remote sensing mapping and analysis of plant health. Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Center for Microbial Oceanography and Harold Garbeil of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology are serving as mentors.

Isaac Rodrigues, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work on the telecommunication subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Isaac and undergraduate teammates are working to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Tyson Seto-Mook, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the command and data handling subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Tyson and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat.

Jordan Torres, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the power system with the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jordan and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission.

Reid Yamura, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work on the command and data handling subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Reid and undergraduate teammates are working to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses have worked together and participated in ARLISS Competitions (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites).

Premo Ames, Todd Esposito and Joleen Iwaniec, Windward Community College, are working with mentors Joe Ciotti, Jake Hudson, and Helen Rapozo, on "Holomua--The Way Forward: Continuing ARLISS Efforts." Their current efforts are focused on re-designing the electronics for quicker data acquisition and faster communications, as well as speedier location determination. In addition, their experiments continue to determine the most efficient airframe design.

Fall 2008 Traineeships

Kauai Community College:

Eric Fune: "Modulation of Light (laser) for Audio Transmission"

Keelan Sakuda: "Space Warrior"

Bradly Wilcox: "Nature of Light with Applications to Astronomy and Biophotonics"

Fall 2007
Fall 2007 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2007 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2007 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Nathan Britton, a senior in Information and Computer Science, will combine his interests in gaming software and space exploration to create a game engine for diverse space and planetary environments. Nathan's project, "Space Sports/Training Simulation," will address design and software engineering issues as well as accurate physical parameters for humans and objects interacting in a variety of settings. Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Science will serve as mentor.

Dennis Dugay, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue as lead engineer on the telecommunication subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Dennis and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting CubeSat satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Windell Jones, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to lead the flight software/data and command handling subsystem. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Windell and undergraduate teammates are working to develop, test, launch, and operate a CubeSat.

Nelson Lazaga, a senior in Biology, will be working with mentor, Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics and the UH NASA Astrobiology Institute, to research the genetics of comb jelly (sea plankton), a member of the last major primitive animal group to have a mitochondrial genome sequenced. Nelson's work, titled "Amplification and Sequencing of the Mitochondrial Genome of the Basal Animal Ctenophore mnemiopsis," is part of the broader goal of understanding the evolution of life on Earth as expressed in NASA's Astrobiology Roadmap.

Zachary Lee-Ho, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working as lead project manager and systems engineer for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Zachary and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Michael Menendez, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the structure subsystem and thermal control for the bus design and layout for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Michael and undergraduate teammates are working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission.

Lori Miyasaki, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on research to improve the mechanical properties and performance of ceramic composite materials for use in space structures. Lori's project, titled "Processing, Performance, and Characterization of Monolith Ceramic Nanocomposites from Preceramic Polymers," will test ceramics with and without added nanoparticles for optimal tension, flexure, and fracture characteristics.

Matthew Patterson, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue as lead engineer on the power generation and distribution subsystem for the Kumu A'o CubeSat team. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Matthew and undergraduate teammates are working to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Wade Tonaki, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is working with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project, titled "Design and Test of a Power Management System in a Picosatellite." Wade brings more than two years of experience working on UH CubeSats to this research effort to design the optimal power management system that maintains a positive power budget and increases the longevity of the satellite system.

Jordan Torres, a junior in electrical Engineering, is joining the Kumu A'o CubeSat team to work on the power system that will provide, store, distribute, and control electrical power for the satellite in orbit. Working with mentors Lloyd French and Byron Wolfe, of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Jordan and undergraduate teammates are working to complete a low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Nicole VanDeBerg, a junior in Geology and Geophysics, will pursue her interests in planetary volcanology with a study of rootless cones on Mars. Using Mars Orbiter Camera data, THEMIS remote sensing data, and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images, Nicole will employ digital image processing and analytical techniques in her project, titled "Lava-Water Ice Interactions on Mars." Dr. Sarah Fagents of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology is serving as mentor.

Alexis Zamora, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on satellite system integration and testing. Alex's project, titled "Packaging and Integration of Systems in Picosatellites" will emphasize designs that insure all the main systems of the satellite are working in tandem and performing efficiently and optimally.

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Melissa Meiner, a senior in Geology and Marine Science, will combine her interests in tsunami research and education to create a permanent Hawaiian tsunami exhibit at the Pacific Tsunami Museum in Hilo. The exhibit will incorporate invaluable imagery from Earth-observing satellites as well as historical data on causes and effects of tsunami to further illustrate the importance of risk assessment, preparedness, and management. Melissa's project, titled "Pacific Tsunami: Continuing Research and the Formation of a Museum Exhibit" will be conducted under mentor Genevieve Cain of the Pacific Tsunami Museum.

 

CanSat Fellows:

Space Grant Community College campuses are sponsoring engineering programs for students to design, build, and test CanSats. A CanSat is a scientific experiment package, the size of a soda can and commonly launched by weather balloon or small rocket, designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth low-atmosphere experiments. The CanSat students from the different campuses have worked together and participated in the September 2006 ARLISS Competition (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada.

Honolulu Community College CanSat Fellows
The CanSat team members at HCC are: Robert Allen, Reynaldo Tabilin, Mark Dalere, Andrew Southiphong, and Nathan Tanoue. Building on their experiences gained at the 2006 ARLISS competition, the team is designing and fabricating components of a new satellite to launch at the 3rd annual CanSat Competition in Texas in June, 2007. The team is busy developing the satellite's enclosure, electronics interfaces, microcontroller software, telemetry system, steerable parachute, and landing system. Mentors working with the HCC team are Vern Takebayashi, Dallas Shiroma, Paul Jacoby, Michael Castell, Helen Rapozo, and Ron Takata.

Windward Community College CanSat Fellows
The CanSat team members at WCC are: Damion Rosbrugh, Premo Ames, William Beggs, Robert Forbus, Travis Osurman, and Joleen Iwaniec. The team is continuing its efforts to develop a new satellite to launch at the 2007 ARLISS Competition (A Rocket Launch for International Student Satellites) in Nevada in September. They have completed the initial design phase and are experimenting with weight distributions and different shapes and for the craft, including a fixed-wing lifting body and parasail. Electronics and systems fabrication and testing will continue through the summer. Mentors working with the WCC team are Jake Hudson and Joseph Ciotti.

Kapiolani Community College CanSat Fellows
The CanSat "Team Daedalus" members at KCC are: Eric Lee, Sae Yoon, Jeremy Chan, and Jimyleah Castro. They are currently working on a project dubbed "Icarus" to develop the electronics for a low-power air-to-ground telemetry system. The mentor working with the KCC team is John Rand.

Fall 2006
Fall 2006 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2006 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2006 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Alexander Ambard, a sophomore, is combining Martian geology and techniques of digital processing of topographic and image data in his project titled "Study of Fluvial Channels Around Olympus Mons Volcano, Mars." Working under the guidance of mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Alexander is investigating sites of potential water release on Mars, the distribution of water channels, and water volumes that could have carved the channels.

Vann Bennett, a senior in Mathematics, is continuing to work with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Planning of Keplerian Orbits: Explicit Trajectories in the 3D Case." Vann's work this semester extends to the three dimensional case and applies geometric optimal control theory to analyze orbital transfers for satellites or spacecraft.

Michelle Bradley, a senior in Interdisciplinary Studies, will work on a project titled "Bringing Mars Science to Hawai'i's Students: Making Science Culturally Relevant to Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders." Working with mentor Dr. Barbara Bruno of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Michelle will develop standards-based space science curriculum focusing on three main topics: water, volcanoes, and sustainable development.

Dennis Dugay, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the satellite concept study and attitude control and systems for the Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System (LEONIDAS) at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Dennis and three undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Dylan Ichikawa, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on satellite-to-ground communications with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Dylan is designing and constructing a ground station at UH Manoa to support direct uplink and downlink to UH CubeSat nanosatellites and other satellites. Dylan's project is titled "A Collaborative, Networked Ground Station for CubeSat Tracking and Communication."

Aukai Kent, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working as systems engineer on the payload/instruments and assist structures for the LEONIDAS small satellite program at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Aukai and three undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.Zachary Lee-Ho, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study and communication capabilities for the LEONIDAS small satellite program at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Zachary and three undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Matthew Patterson, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the concept study, power, and assist structures for the LEONIDAS small satellite program at UH Manoa. Working with mentor, Lloyd French of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Matthew and three undergraduate teammates are developing the mission concept and design to enable Hawaii to complete an entire low-Earth-orbiting satellite mission, from design to construction, launch, and operations.

Daniel Rogers, a sophomore in Physics, is working with mentor Dr. Eric Gaidos of the Department of Geology and Geophysics on a project concerning the origin and formation of stars. Daniel is using computer models of stellar clusters in his project titled "The Environment and Distribution of Early Stellar Systems."

Tyler Tamashiro, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "Design and Test of a Picosatellite Network." Following two successful semesters as a trainee studying networking methods and applications, Tyler will now work to design, implement and test hardware and software for the communication network for a cluster of satellites in support of the UH Small-Satellite Programs including CubeSat and LEONIDAS.

Lisa Tatsumi, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer of the Institute of Astronomy on a project titled, "Temporal Changes in Martian Slope Streaks." Lisa is investigating the physical characteristics of newly formed steaks, rates of formation, and causes of fading of slope streaks based on Viking Orbiter images and new high-resolution images from the Mars Orbiter Camera.

Monte Watanabe, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue working on the design and fabrication of the antenna necessary for satellite-to-Earth communications for CubeSats as well as inter-satellite communications. Monte's project titled, "Planar Antennas for Small Satellite Communications" is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering. Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering serves as project mentor.

Faye Yuen, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue with a project whose goals of detecting life in extreme environments are in support of astrobiology research. Under the mentorship of Dr. Kim Binsted of the Department of Information and Computer Sciences, Faye is working on building, programming, and testing a network of small electromechanical sensors designed to measure biomarkers in a project titled, "Fabrication of a Wireless Sensor Network for Extreme Environments."

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Luke Linhoff, a senior in Biology, will continue working with mentor Dr. Jason Turner of the Department of Marine Science to investigate the growth and survival of shrimp in small closed ecosystems and to determine how laboratory results can be applied to experimental life support systems in space. The title of Luke's project is "Analysis of Halocaridina rubra in an Endogenously Controlled Closed Ecosystem." Research this semester will include laboratory experimentation as well as studies of the more complicated natural habitat of the shrimp.

CanSat Fellows:

  • Robert C. Allen, Honolulu Community College.

  • Doyle Brooks, Windward Community College.

  • Justin J. Carland, Kapiolani Community College.

  • Melodee Ann K. Ferreira, Honolulu Community College.

  • Blake T. Inouye, Honolulu Community College.

  • Layne H. Katsumoto, Honolulu Community College.

  • Indar P. Lange, Kapiolani Community College.

  • Eric S. Lee, Leeward Community College.

  • Damion R. Rosbrugh, Windward Community College.

  • Sae J. Yoon, Kapiolani Community College.

 

 

Fall 2006 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Reece Iwami, a sophmore in Electrical Engineering, will continue working with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "Tracking Software for Student Satellites." As part of ground station operations, Reece is working with communications software for real-time analysis of satellite orbits. This project is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering.

Fall 2005
Fall 2005 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2005 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2005 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. Traineeships were awarded to students at Manoa and the Community Colleges.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Justin Akagi, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is analyzing power budgets for energy production and consumption for small-satellite applications. Justin's project, titled "Power Generation and Distribution System Design for the LEONIDAS CubeSat Network" focuses on a low-Earth orbit nanosatellite cluster network, which is a joint venture of the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium and the UH College of Engineering. Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering serves as mentor.

Matthew Bell, a senior in Anthropology, will continue his work with mentor Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology on remote sensing techniques applied to archaeology and historic preservation. Matthew's project, titled "Archaeology on Easter Island" emphasizes the use of QuickBird satellite imagery and GIS mapping techniques to document monumental ceremonial platforms on Rapa Nui. Matthew's work includes the development and field testing of a kite aerial photography rig.

William Carrier, a sophomore in Physics, will continue experiments under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Ralf Kaiser of the Department of Chemistry, to characterize infrared spectra of germanium-carrying molecules in low temperature ices. His project titled, "Chemistry of Germane and Methane in the Atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn," will aid our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of giant gas planets, and the data will be useful for future astronomical searches with infrared spectroscopy.

David Gremminger, a senior in Geology & Geophysics, will continue to use images from Viking Orbiter and Mars Orbiter Camera to study the surface of Mars; in particular, the physical characteristics and rates of formation and fading of slope streaks. Mentor Dr. Norbert Schorghofer, of the Institute for Astronomy, supervises David's project, titled "Decadal Variability in Slope Streak Activity on Mars."

Tyson Kikugawa, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is working on a project titled, "Systems Integration and Stabilization of a CubeSat" addressing the crucial aspects of overall configuration and stabilization of a satellite. This project is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering. Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering will serve as mentor.

Kin Wai Leung, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Beei-Huan Chao of the Department of Mechanical Engineering to study the burning and extinction of diffusion flames in space through analytical and numerical modeling. Kin Wai's project is titled "A Theoretical Investigation of the Kinetic and Radiative Extinction of Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity."

Brandon Merz, a senior in Physics, will work on instrumentation for ANITA (Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna), an experiment developed to search for ultra-high-energy neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice cap using a cluster of balloon-borne antennas. Working under the guidance of mentor Dr. Gary Varner of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brandon will study the triggering system in his project titled, "Development of a Trigger Unit for Radio Frequency Optimization for Neutrino Detector in Antarctica."

Shelly Migita, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor, Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a project titled, "Effects of Low Reynolds Numbers on the Aerodynamics of Micro-Air Vehicles." Shelly's interests in aeronautics are well suited for her study of computational fluid dynamics models of different wing geometries to better understand the aerodynamics of small, unpiloted aerial vehicles.

Carolyn Parcheta, a sophomore in Geology and Geophysics, will pursue her interests in planetary geophysics with a study of flow velocities and volume fluxes for lava flows on Olympus Mons, Mars. Using Mars Orbiter Camera data and THEMIS thermal remote sensing images, Carolyn will make use of digital image processing and analytical techniques in her project, titled "Estimating Effusion Rates for Olympus Mons, Mars." Dr. Sarah Fagents and Dr. Barbara Bruno, both of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, are serving as Carolyn's mentors.

Gabriel Wofford, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will continue working with mentor Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology on a project titled, "Analysis of Satellite Imagery Documentation of Archeology on Rapa Nui." Using QuickBird satellite imagery, image analysis, GIS spatial mapping, and ground-truth fieldwork, Gabriel's project is helping to document prehistoric practices on Rapa Nui (Easter Island).

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Walter (Eli) Bressert, a senior in Astronomy and Mathematics, will work with mentor Dr. Michael West of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on a project utilizing statistical models with Hubble Space Telescope data of globular clusters. Eli's project, titled "Reconstruction of the Evolution of Galaxies using the Extended-Press-Schechter Model with Globular Clusters" will provide quantitative constraints on the merger histories of individual galaxies.

Sarah Knights, a senior in Astronomy, is continuing her project on star formation using Hubble Space Telescope data to analyze the number and dynamics of young binary star systems. Sarah's project, titled "Determining the Distribution of Young Binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster" also includes observing time at the UH 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea. Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy is serving as mentor for this research.

 

 

Fall 2005 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Tyler Tamashiro, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "Intersatellite Communication Network for Picosatellite Clusters." Tyler will study various networking methods and applications for a cluster of picosatellites. This project is part of the larger UH Small-Satellite Program championed since 2001 by faculty and students in the UH College of Engineering.

 

Community Colleges:

Robert AllenBlake Inouye (both computer systems students at HCC), and Eric Lee (electrical engineering student at KCC, LCC) are working with mentor Dr. Vern Takebayashi of the Computer Electronics and Networking Technology Program at Honolulu Community College on CanSat. a scientific experiment package that fits into a soda can and works at low altitudes, commonly attached to a weather balloon. CanSats are being designed to retrieve photographic, temperature, pressure, and altitude data for near-Earth, low-atmosphere experiments.

Carlos Reyes (international business student at KCC) and Sae Yoon (civil engineering student at KCC) worked with mentor Dr. John Rand of the Mathematics and Science Department at Kapi'olani Community College on CanSat and attended the National CanSat Competition this past summer in Mudrock, California.

Damion Rosbrugh (science student at WCC) worked with mentor Dr. Jake Hudson of the Natural Sciences Department at Windward Community College on CanSat and also attended the National CanSat Competition.

Fall 2004
Fall 2004 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2004 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2004 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Kristine Ayson, a senior in Biology and Physics, will work with mentor Dr. Karen Meech of the Institute for Astronomy on a project utilizing a large database of comet images. Kristine's project, titled "The Effects of Aging on the Morphology of the Dust Comae of Periodic and Non-periodic Comets with Regards to the Formation of Jets" will include the collection and processing of images from the UH 2.2 meter telescope at Mauna Kea.

Josh Nagashima, a senior in Chemistry will work with mentor Dr. Craig Jensen of the Department of Chemistry researching "Hydrogen Fuel Storage-Metal Hydrides." Josh's work will help develop improved hydrogen cycling capacities of metal hydrides, which could ultimately lead to an improvement of cost and performance of energy storage in spacecraft.

Bridget Cantu, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will use theoretical analyses to study the effects of high-frequency vibrations and micro-convection on the motion of suspended crystals in microgravity environments. Bridget's project, titled "Effects of g-jitter on the Motion of Particle Seeds for Microgravity Crystal Growth Applications," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Michele Harman, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will use remote sensing data from the IKONOS satellite, GIS, and field observations to map native and invasive plants in the Makaha Valley watershed. Working with mentor Dr. Tomoaki Miura of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Michele seeks to understand the effects of invasive species on biodiversity and ecosystems. The project is titled "Understanding how Earth is Changing: Invasive Species."

Jasen Kaya, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will pursue a project titled "Effects of Slip Condition on the Aerodynamics of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles." Working with mentor Dr. Marcelo Kobayashi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jasen will use computational fluid dynamics tools to investigate the forces and moments acting on the vehicles at high altitudes.

David Narahara, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on a project titled, "Processing, Performance, and Characterization of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites with Nanoparticles" with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. David seeks to understand how the addition of nanoparticles may improve the mechanical performance of ceramic composites used in high temperature jet-engine or space hardware components.

Alina Stauffer, a senior in Mathematics, will continue working with mentor Dr. Monique Chyba of the Department of Mathematics on a project titled "Optimizing Orbital Transfer." Alina's work emphasizes the use of differential geometry and numerical simulations visualized in 3D to solve how to transfer satellites or spacecraft from one orbit to another in the shortest time.

Kristina Wong, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue her interdisciplinary research project involving physics, engineering, and materials science. Kristina's project, titled "Study of Micro- and Nano-cracks in Fatigued Advanced Materials" includes samples from the Shuttle Columbia and is being conducted with mentor Dr. Murli Manghnani of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. She is using a variety of advanced microscopes in her study of the elastic properties of ceramic fiber-reinforced composite materials and ceramic sensors used in space vehicles.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Anna Moore, a senior in Geography, will continue her project using Geographic Information Systems to analyze lichen morphology in relation to its distribution over different elevations and growing surfaces. Anna's project, titled "Spatial Distribution of the Lichen Stereocaulon vulcani on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i" will document the growing habits of this primitive plant that shows tolerance to environmental extremes, which may prove beneficial to future astrobiology research. Serving as mentor this semester is Dr. Rebecca Ostertag of the Department of Biology.

Amanda Leonard, a senior in Geology, will work with mentor Drs. Jene Michaud and Ken Hon of the Department of Geology to create a new illustrated brochure and companion website on the natural history of Mauna Kea Volcano. Her project, titled "Educational Outreach for Mauna Kea Astronomy" is designed to give the public a better understanding of the natural history, astronomical discoveries, and cultural significance of Mauna Kea.

 

Fall 2004 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Kalil G. Abdullah, a freshman in Microbiology, will work with mentor Dr. Dulal Borthakur of the Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering to learn about aspects of genetic engineering. Kalil's traineeship, titled "Preserving Bacteria in Space Through Genetic Engineering," will help him gain valuable experience in laboratory techniques.

Fall 2003
Fall 2003 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2003 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2003 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Blaine Murakami, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on satellite-to-satellite communication techniques. Blaine's project, titled "Retrodirective Antenna Array Design for CubeSat Applications and CubeSat Program Management" will emphasize simulation and design of the experimental antenna arrays that serve as the satellite payload. In addition to his technical responsibilities, Blaine serves as Program Engineer leading the 30+ students on the UH CubeSat/NanoSat Program.

Jennifer Olson, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will use remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently orbiting Earth to study active volcanoes. Jennifer's project, titled "Monitoring Persistent Lava Lakes from Space," is being conducted under mentors Dr. Luke Flynn and Dr. Andy Harris of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Jennifer's work will contribute to our understanding of the mass flux of lava lakes on Mount Erebus, Antarctica and Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia.

Lance Yoneshige, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on structural dynamics, vibration, and thermal stress analyses with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Lance's project, "Design, Analysis, Manufacture, and Test of the Structural Housing of the University of Hawai`i NanoSat," is part of a larger research program involving Electrical, Civil, and Mechanical Engineering students and mentors. As leader of the Mechanical Structures and Analysis team, Lance will help design the NanoSat structure with space qualified materials.

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Steven Clegg, a senior in Geology, will continue his field testing of the FLYSPEC instrument in measuring atmospheric sulfur dioxide emissions at Kilauea volcano. Steven's project, titled "Ground-truth Measurements of Volcanic SO2 Using the New UV Correlation Spectrometer FLYSPEC" has practical applications as an on-site tool for locating sources of volcanic emissions, mapping SO2 concentration levels from volcanic plumes, and as a correlation tool for remote sensing systems. Dr. Keith Horton of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology serves as mentor for this research.

 

Fall 2003 Undergraduate Traineeships

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Jennale Peacock, a senior in Astronomy, will work with mentor Dr. Keith Horton of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology to learn the field use of the FLYSPEC instrument and how its measurements relate to remote sensing data. Jennale's traineeship will help her gain experience in electronics, optics, chemistry, and volcanology as she uses the FLYSPEC instrument to collect vent emission data in Volcanoes National Park.

 

Honolulu Community College:

Robert Fleming, a sophomore in Aeronautics, will work with mentor Dr. Robert Takamine of the Aeronautics Department on a traineeship project titled "Pattern Damage Analysis of Thermal Protective System." Robert's project will focus on case studies of the thermal protective tiles on space shuttles STS-86 through STS-106 to ultimately determine damage patterns.

 

Kapi'olani Community College:

Jon Samaniego, a freshman in Radiology, will gain practical experience in cardiovascular research during his traineeship project titled "The Effect of Gravitationally Induced Stress on Cardiovascular Variability." Jon is interested in the heart's response to stress when the body changes positions. Dr. John Rand of the Mathematics and Science Department will serve as mentor on this project.This study has implications for astronaut health during long-term microgravity exposure.

Fall 2002
Fall 2002 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2002 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2002 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Clyde Campos, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on a rocket project for placing 10-kg payloads into Earth orbit. Clyde's project, titled "Dedicated Orbital Rocket for Small Payloads (DORSP)" will emphasize principles of rocket propulsion and orbital dynamics. Clyde hopes his research will help emphasize the benefits of new, efficient, and smaller-scale rockets for use with small payloads.

Donielle Chittenden, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, is interested in evaluating the use of remote sensing data of different spatial resolutions to differentiate pahoehoe from a`a lava flows. She will focus on data and field work on Mauna Loa before applying her ideas of resolution limits to satellite images of volcanic terrain at Olympus Mons, Mars. Donielle's project, titled "Comparing Lava Flows on Mauna Loa to Olympus Mons, Mars through Remote Sensing," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Scott Rowland of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Westin Fujii, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Westin's project, "Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Precision Joints for the Integration of Active Composite Struts and Panels into an Adaptive Platform for Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning," is part of a larger research program that has included former Space Grant Fellows. Westin is helping to design, test, and monitor structural positioning performance of metals for intelligent aeronautical and aerospace structures.

Seth Kamemoto, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work on a robot vision project titled, "Visual Sensing in Autonomous Robots." Under the direction of mentor Dr. Tep Dobry of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Seth is designing hardware and software to optimize the path taken by an autonomous robot through a maze. This research benefits the space industry's need for unpiloted or robotic systems that can function in remote, extreme environments.

Conred Maddox, a junior majoring in Philosophy and English, will be working on a project, titled "High School Science Curriculum Based on Model Rocketry" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Jeff Taylor of the Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Lessons in the curriculum will be aligned with National and Hawai`i State Educational Standards and will involve physical sciences, engineering concepts, and computer technology. Conred is collaborating with a local high school to help test and evaluate the curriculum, which will eventually be available online.

Alex Niemi, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be working with a microgravity simulator, using rotary vessels to study heat flux for boiling in space. His work, titled "Determination of the Onset of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions," will be performed under mentor Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Alex's project compliments his interests in the broad field of fluid mechanics and its application in the aerospace industry.

Aaron Ohta, a senior in Electrical Engineering, has just completed a Summer Fellowship and will continue working on the project titled "CubeSat: Student Projects in Satellite Technology." Mentor for this project is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Together with a team of more than 50 students and eight faculty, Aaron is serving as overall Project Director and is working on the tracking, telemetry, and command subsystems. Aaron's technical responsibilities in the project are with the Active Antenna group helping to design a working grid oscillator.

Karl Santa, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with composite and piezoelectric materials with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Karl's project, "Design, Analysis, and Optimization of a Circular Smart Composite Panel with Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning Capabilities," is part of a larger research program, including former Space Grant Fellows, to design, test, and monitor structural positioning performance of metals for intelligent aeronautical and aerospace structures.

Michael Tamamoto, a senior in Electrical Engineering, has just completed a Summer Fellowship and is continuing his work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on the CubeSat project. In addition to serving as Co-Director of this 50+ member team, Michael is working directly on the communication requirements of the satellite system as part of the Active Antenna group. The title of Michael's project is "CubeSat: Active Antennas and Circularly Polarized Antennas for CubeSat Applications."

Kristen Teranishi, a junior in Zoology, will research cooling regimes and their affects on freezing and dehydration survival of nematodes. Kristen's project, titled "Cooling as a Primary Stress to Enhance Cryobiosis/Anhydrobiosis," will be conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. Christopher Womersley of the Department of Zoology. This research on metabolic adaptations under low-temperature stress has important implications in the broader context of bioastronomy and life in extreme environments.

Adam Vorsino, a a junior in Biology, will work on a project titled, "Enhancement of Dehydration Survival and Suspended Animation." Adam aims to study the effects of certain sugars to enhance the ability of organisms, in this case nematodes, to enter into prolonged suspended animation induced by dehydration. The work has implications for research into the stability of dry biological systems, organisms, and foodstuff during extended space flights. Dr. Christopher Womersley of the Department of Zoology will serve as mentor for this research.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Lisa Wedding, a senior in Marine Science, will map and classify coral reefs using color infrared aerial photographs and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. Lisa's project, titled "Habitat Mapping in Hawaiian Marine Protected Areas Utilizing Remote Sensing Data" will be performed under mentor Dr. Barbara Gibson of the Geography Department. The results of this work will benefit conservation and management of coral reef ecosystems in Hawai'i.

 

Fall 2001
Fall 2001 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2001 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 2001 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo. The awards were given for space-related research and provide a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jason Akagi, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will perform experiments under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering, to better understand brain wave signal processing and its use as an alternative method of controlling robots. Jason's project, titled "Remote Vehicle Control by EEG Biofeedback," will involve the design and construction of a radio-controlled robot that will receive commands via brain wave signals from a person connected to an EEG device.

Tai Blechta, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor, Dr. Lloyd Hihara of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, to study the feasibility of using sol-gel based ceramic coatings as corrosion-resistant undercoats for metal alloys used in aerospace components. This research, titled "Advanced Surface Protectants for Aerospace Alloys" will help us better understand this new coating technology and its use in preventing corrosion, weakening, or failure of metallic components in space hardware.

Michael Hall, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will design and fabricate a miniature tunable laser with the aim of improving resolution, stability, and power for airborne or spaceborne spectroscopic instruments used for atmospheric and environmental monitoring. Michael's project, titled "Optics: External-Cavity Diode Lasers" will be conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. Audra Bullock of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Dennis Higashiguchi, a junior in Entomology, will work on a project titled, "The Gut Flora of the Formosan Subterranean Termite as a Model of an Exotic Ecosystem." Dennis aims to culture, characterize, and identify microbes that survive in the exotic ecosystem of the termite gut as an analog for identifying extraterrestrial life forms that may thrive independent of solar energy. Dr. Claudia Husseneder of the Department of Entomology will serve as mentor for this research.

Jonathan Iloreta, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will develop a mathematical model to describe soot formation processes from combustion systems in his work with mentor, Dr. Beei-Huan Chao of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The reduction of soot is a primary concern of fire safety issues in spacecraft. Jonathan's research, titled "Effects of Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Radiation on the Sooting Behavior of Spherical Diffusion Flames" will have practical applications for experiments to be performed in microgravity on the International Space Station.

Randall Imaoka, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue working with mentor, Dr. Carlos Coimbra, to understand how particles move in viscous fluids. His project, titled "Scale-up Study of Viscous Particle Motion Under Microgravity Conditions," will be used to aid in the design of experiments on the International Space Station. Understanding how particles move in fluids in microgravity environments is necessary to design safe and efficient liquid containers for use in space.

Lynnette Ramirez, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will study fluid mechanics and particle motion under simulated microgravity. Using high-speed digital photography to map the orbital motions of particles in suspension, Lynnette's work has important implications for research on cell and tissue development and behavior under unnatural or forced conditions as might be experienced during long-term space travel. Dr. Carlos Coimbra of the Department of Mechanical Engineering will serve as mentor for this research.

Randy Sakagawa, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on the fundamentals of piezoelectric and composite materials and the use of these advanced materials for space structures.. Randy's focus will be on the lateral vibration suppression and precision positioning of Active Composite Panels. His project is titled "Design, Analysis, Manufacture, and Testing of Active Composite Panel Prototypes with Embedded Sensors/Actuators and Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning Capabilities."

Cory Soon, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will work with composite and piezoelectric materials with mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Cory's project, titled "Integration of Active Composite Struts and Panels into an Adaptive Platform for Vibration Suppression and Precision Positioning," is part of a larger research program, including former Space Grant Fellows, to test and monitor structural positioning performance of metals for intelligent aeronautical and aerospace structures.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Daniel Garrett, a senior in Marine Science, will use remote sensing data to investigate possible increased sea surface temperatures and surface chlorophyll concentrations at active eruption sites along the southeast coast of the Big Island. Daniel's project, titled "The Use of MODIS and In-Situ Data to Study the Relationship of Primary Productivity to Lava Inputs off the Southeast Coast of Hawaii" will be conducted under the direction of mentor, Dr. Michael Parsons of the Department of Marine Science.

Jennifer Halsted, a senior in Astronomy, will work with mentor, Dr. Michael West of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, to analyze digital images from the Keck I observatory of structures and colors within a unique star pile. Jennifer's research, titled "'Starpile' in Abell 545" will involve data reduction using the IRAF astronomy software to determine the stellar population, magnitude, and structure of the star pile. This data should lead to a clearer understanding of the origin of the star pile as a possible accumulation of stellar remnants from a tidally disrupted galaxy or from multiple colliding galaxies.

 

Fall 2001 Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Fall of 2001 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and Hilo, and at the Community Colleges. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend between $250 to $1,000 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Kristy Kadota, a senior in Elementary Education, will work with mentor Mr. Art Kimura of the Future Flight Hawaii K-12 Education Project, on the development and broad dissemination of new hands-on, inquiry-based science lessons related to the International Space Station. Kristy's project, titled "Space: The Ultimate Field Trip" will focus on space science themes in standards-based activities which will be designed and tested for use in classrooms and family science nights.

Ian Layugan and Dennis Liang, seniors in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Audra Bullock of the Department of Electrical Engineering to participate in the building of a Differential Absorption Lidar. Ian will be involved in the design of the receiver and Dennis will work on the transmitter. Laser Detection and Ranging (Lidar) systems are important remote sensing tools for real-time atmospheric measurements.

Leeward Community College:

Malia Fujimoto and Athena Altman will work with mentor, Dr. Fritz Osell, on the acquisition of star cluster images, variable star measurements, and asteroid tracking using the automated 20-inch Ritchey-Chretien research telescope at LCC.

Fall 2000
Fall 2000 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 2000 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2000 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and the Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Wendi Maeda, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue her research on miniature optical systems with mentor Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Wendi's work, titled "Optical Attenuators on a Single Chip," uses MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. This research benefits the space industry's growing need for smaller and more efficient optical signal processing devices on satellites.

Kendall Ching, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue his research on multi-layered designs and structures of 3-D integrated circuits with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Kendall's project, titled "Multilayer Photonic Bandgap Integrated Circuits," is using photonic-bandgap technology in the quest for smaller, power-efficient instrumentation for space-based communication and sensor systems.

Keith Sunderlin, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be researching the use of strain gauges and piezo-electric material to make a velocity sensor for dead-reckoning navigation in space or underwater environments. Keith's project, titled "Omni-directional Velocity Sensing Whisker (Sensor)," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Song K. Choi of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Leon Geschwind, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will work with mentors Drs. Luke Flynn and Andrew Harris of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on "Multi- and Hyperspectral Comparative Studies of Active Lava Flows." Data from Landsat visible and thermal images and hyperspectral field measurements will be combined to map active lava flows and lava tubes on Kilauea. Using lava cooling rates he obtained in last semester's project, Leon will attempt to use his map as a tool to predict lava ages in remote sensing images.

Crystal Yee, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will design and test fiber-optic strain gauges with mentor Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Her investigation, titled "Fiber-optic Strain Gauges," is part of the pioneering research efforts in the use of fiber-optic sensors to test and monitor mechanical properties of metals in new aeronautical and aerospace vehicles.

Georgiana Young, a junior in Geology and Geophysics will use Mars Global Surveyor data to research the corrugated landforms, known as aureole material, around Olympus Mons volcano on Mars. She will create a database of landform shapes and sizes to better understand the materials and to test the hypothesis that they have a volcanic origin. Her work, titled "Analysis of the Olympus Mons Aureole Material on Mars using MGS Data," will be conducted under mentor Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Jack Bennett, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is working in the field of fiber-optics communications. With mentor Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Jack will study laser and Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) technology to design a micro-optical device on a single chip using MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The title of his project is "Micro-sized Optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing Devices."

Sze Mei Chung, a senior in Biology (pre-med) will be studying terrestrial volcanism using Geostationary Orbiting Earth Satellite (GOES) data. Field studies on the Big Island will aid in the interpretation of satellite data of thermal activity, eruptions, and lava flows. Her work, titled "Remote Sensing of Volcanoes," will be performed under mentor Dr. Luke Flynn of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology.

Jeff Chang, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will continue to research the use of Micro- ElectroMechanical System (MEMS) impedance tuners in coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission lines. His project, titled "Miniature Impedance Tuner for High Frequency Transmitters," has practical applications for space communications and remote sensing systems. Jeff is working under the direction of mentor Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Tobias Hewitt, a senior in Geology, will continue his research on the mineralogy of lava tubes. He is determining the conditions under which magnesioferrite forms in an effort to assess its use as a diagnostic mineral for locating tubes in volcanic provinces using in remote sensing data. Tobias' project, titled "Magnesioferrite Formation Within Lava Tubes" is being conducted with mentor Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology.

Gail Ostrander, a senior in Geology, will continue her study of soil moisture using visible and thermal data from the AVHRR satellite. Gail's project, titled, "Sensitivity Analysis of the NDVI Snapshot Method Applied Using AVHRR Data" covers three locations with different climates and hydrologic conditions. Mentor for this project is Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology.

Ogden Ingalls, a sophomore in Physics, will continue working with mentor Dr. William Heacox of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on applying statistical models to a study of masses of halo dark objects. Ogden aims to better understand dark matter-gravitational lensing events in the Large Magellanic Cloud in a project titled "Microlensing: Determination of Mass Distribution in the Milky Way."

 

Kapi'olani Community College:

Dennis Higashiguchi, a sophomore in Liberal Arts, will be characterizing bacterial species in the gut microbes of Coptotermes formanus, the Formosan termite. His study of microbial communities and ecosystems is relevant to current astrobiology research on the origin, evolution, distribution, and destiny of life in the universe. Dennis' project, titled "Characterization of an Exotic Microbial Ecosystem" will be conducted under mentor Dr. John Berestecky of the Department of Microbiology.

 

Maui Community College:

Sharon Harlow, a fourth year Education major, will work with mentor Dr. John Pye of the Math/Science Division on a project, titled "A Case Study in Remote Sensing and its Application to Emergency Management." Working at the Pacific Disaster Center on Maui, Sharon will gain practical experience in the principles of remote sensing and its use by emergency managers.

Brian Africano, a third year Liberal Arts major, will be working on a project, titled "Monitoring Near-Earth Asteroids With the USAFRL/Boeing RTS Raven System." Brian will observe and analyze data using the automated, Raven small telescope system at the Maui Research and Technology Park. Mentor for this project is Dr. John Pye of the Math/Science Division.

Windward Community College:

Mark Hedley, a sophomore in Physics and Astronomy, and Cassandra Mason, a sophomore in Mathematics, will work together on "Setting up a Radio Astronomy Telescope at WCC to Monitor Radio Signals from Jupiter." Working under the direction of mentor Dr. Richard Flagg, they will monitor and record radio bursts from Jupiter with prototype equipment being assembled and tested for a future radio telescope system on campus.

 

 

Fall 2000 Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded an undergraduate traineeship in the Spring of 2000 to a student at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The award provided laboratory training and practical experience in a space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend between $250 to $1,000 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Evan Hajime, a senior in Chemistry, will continue working with mentor Dr. David Harwell of the Department of Chemistry on the synthesis of silicon and metal-enhanced silicon nanoparticles. These super crystals of semiconductor materials are the first step in the formation of molecular computational devices. Evan's work benefits current research to improve semiconductor performance in space-based electronics.

1999 - 1990

Spring 1999
Spring 1999 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1999 Fellowships 

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 1999 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Robert Tomasetti, a senior in Zoology, will work with mentor, Dr. Marlin Atkinson of the Department of Oceanography, on "Analyzing Reflective Spectra of Corals for Use in Remote Sensing." Robert will use High Performance Liquid Chromatography on coral pigments. This work has practical applications to mapping the distribution of species along reef zones with remote sensing data.

Gregory Kodani, a junior in Electrical Engineering, is continuing his project to improve power and efficiency of millimeter-wave-frequency remote sensing systems. Gregory's project is titled, "MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) Variable Capacitors." His mentor is Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

David Ishimitsu, a junior majoring in Mathematics, will continue his work with mentor, Dr. Brent Tully of the Department of Astromony, on "Mapping the Universe." David's project will produce a three-dimensional map of our Local Supercluster of galaxies which may lead to better understanding of the mass distribution and large-scale structure of the universe.

Kristi Arakaki, a senior in Biology and Accounting, will be researching an aspect of astronaut fitness: collision-avoidance ability. Kristi's project, titled "Crash Avoidance in Virtual Space: Age Differences in Emergency Evasive Maneuvers" will utilize a computer-based driving simulator. Performed under the guidance of mentor Dr. Max Vercruyssen of the Department of Medicine, Kristi's work will contribute to a better understanding of what characterizes peak performances of time-critical maneuvers.

Megaan Clark, a junior in Biology, will work with mentor, Dr. Max Vercruyssen of the Department of Medicine, on assessing the abilities of individuals to react quickly to environmental stimuli, especially as applied to fitness for astronaut duty. Megaan's project, titled "Elder Astronaut: Development of a Fitness for Duty Test Battery" will relate a person's time perception, movement speed, coordination, and information processing skills to his or her fitness to pilot spacecraft.

Andrew Guyette, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue to work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on the use of quasi-optical techniques to ultimately define a single antenna capable of both high-gain and low-gain operation in space. Andrews's project is titled "Quasi-Optical Power Amplifier."

Kimo Marion, a junior in Biosystems Engineering, will continue to investigate the effectiveness of marine algae species in enhancing a closed-environment life support system for space habitats. Working under the direction of mentor Dr. Loren Gautz of the Department of Biosystems Engineering, Kimo's project title is "A CELSS Simulator to Evaluate Marine Algae for Space Research."

Leon Geschwind, a junior in Global Environmental Science, will work with mentor, Dr. Luke Flynn of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, using GOES thermal data (from the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites) to study volcanic activity on Earth. Leon's project, titled, "Monitoring Real Time Volcanic Events" will also assess the utility of monitoring heat signatures of volcanoes as a predictive tool for eruptions.

William Forsyth, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will continue his project aimed at improving bandwidth efficiency of radio wave transmissions in space with a new equalizer design. William's research, titled "High Frequency Transmission Line Equalizer" is being conducted under mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Kevin Magnuson, a senior in Chemistry, will work on the synthesis and kinetic analysis of sodium aluminum hydride compounds in his project titled, "Hydrogen Storage for Spacecraft." Under the direction of mentor, Dr. Craig Jensen of the Department of Chemisry, Kevin's research is important to the development of new, on-board hydrogen storage systems to be used for spacecraft fuel.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Susie Shaw, a senior in Geology, is continuing a study of spectral reflectance data on Kilauea Volcano. Susie's project, titled, "Field Determination of Visible to Near IR Spectral Characteristics of Basaltic Surfaces and Sulfur Mineral Coatings: Application of Natural Spectra to Remote Sensing to Io" is guided by mentor Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology.

Joanne Snow, a senior in Chemistry, will be working with mentor Dr. Edward Herlicska of the Department of Chemistry on fullerene chemistry, which is important to studies of carbon in extraterrestrial materials. Joanne will aim to synthesize known and new derivatives of fulleride C 60 in a project titled, " Synthesis and Characterization of Buckminsterfullerene Derivatives."

Jessica Powers, a junior in Astronomy, will continue to acquire observations on Mauna Kea and study the initial stages of star formation. Jessica's project, titled "High-Resolution Imaging/Modelling of Circumstellar Disks" will be performed under mentor Dr. Gerald Moriarty-Schieven of the Joint Astronomy Centre.

 

Windward Community College:

Kimberly Andersen, a Geology major, will be working with mentor, Dr.Floyd McCoy of the Geology Department, on a study of sand composition and size distribution in Kaneohe Bay, O'ahu in relation to airborne remote sensing data. Kimberly will use GPS to record site locations. The title of her project is, "Determining the Correlations Between Hyperspectral Images and Sand Size as well as Chemical Composition."

Thomas Young, an Ethnobotany major, will be working with mentor, Dr. Inge White of the Natural Sciences Department, on a project titled, "Aseptically Grown Vegetables for Consumption in Space." Thomas's project explores the application of tissue culture techniques in the farming of salad crops in small, enclosed environments such as the space station.

Spring 1998
Spring 1998 Undergraduate Participants

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 2018 to students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and Hilo. Undergraduate traineeships were awarded to students at several campuses.

Spring 1998 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 1998 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Community Colleges. At Manoa, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $2500 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jessica Hiraoka, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on "Computer Aided Testing (CAT) of a Piezoelectric Active Strut for Space Structures using Labview Software." Working under mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jessica's objective is to develop software for automatic application of voltage during testing and operation of three miniature active struts designed and fabricated by former Space Grant Fellows.

Dan Sakata, also a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will perform final trouble-shooting of the intelligent-composite active struts tested initially by previous Space Grant Fellows. His work, titled "Trouble-Shooting, Assembly, and Testing of a Piezoelectric Active Strut for Space Structures," will be carried out under the guidance of mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Melinda McKinney, a junior majoring in Physics and Mathematics, will continue her research on a mathematical model and computer simulation of the fractal nature of lava flow margins. Melinda's project, titled "Are Lava Flows in a State of Self-Organized Criticality?"may lead to a better understanding of the internal dynamics of lava flows on Earth and other planets. Her mentor is Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor of HIGP and the Department of Geology & Geophysics.

Casey Law, a junior in Physics, will continue researching the relative age of globular cluster M71 with respect to other thick disk clusters in our Galaxy in his project called, "Examining the Relative Ages of Thick Disk Globular Clusters." Working under the direction of his mentor, Dr. James Heasley of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Casey is using photometric data obtained at telescopes on Mauna Kea and Kitt Peak National Observatory in his efforts to better understand the evolution of the Milky Way.

Daniel Sherwood, a junior in Meteorology is studying "Optical Depth Variability in the Central Pacific." Serving as mentor for this project is Dr. Anthony Clarke of the Department of Oceanography. Daniel will use photometric data collected at sea level and at the Mauna Loa Observatory to assess the temporal changes in aerosol optical depth in the atmosphere within and above the Pacific Marine Boundary Layer. This information would benefit satellite remote sensing studies of the oceans, atmosphere, and climate.

Tuan Ha, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will be using the VHDL programming language to design a decoder system for research on high-speed communications over satellite channels. His project, titled "Design of a Decoder System for Reliable High-Speed Satellite Communication," will be conducted under mentor Dr. Gregory Uehara of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Tilan Copson, a junior in Physics, will be using an acoustical microscopy technique to examine the microstructure of high-temperature materials. Her project, called "Determination of Elastic Moduli of Ceramic Composites at High Temperatures," has applications to aeronautical propulsion technology and the development of high-temperature engine materials. Tilan's mentor is Dr. Murli Manghnani of HIGP and the Department of Geology & Geophysics.

Lisa Chau, a junior in Zoology, will study "Variations in Chlorophyll in the Ross Sea as Deter-mined by Direct Measurement and Satellite Imagery." She will use sea-surface chlorophyll data provided by NASA's SeaWiFS ocean color sensor and high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses of phytoplankton samples collected by ships in the Ross Sea. The work relates to the evaluation of the role of the Southern Ocean in global climate change. Lisa is working under the guidance of mentors Dr. Robert Bidigare and Mi-ok Park of the Department of Oceanography.

Leslie Cotton, a junior in Biology, will be researching phytoplankton abundance in the vicinity of the Hawaiian Islands using remote sensing data from SeaWiFS and TOPEX/Poseidon satellites and high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses of phytoplankton samples from leeward eddy regions. Leslie's project, titled "The Hawaiian Islands Leeward Cyclonic and Acyclonic Eddies: Physical Processes that Effect Phytoplankton Biomass and Primary Production," is being conducted under mentors Dr. Robert Bidigare and Mi-ok Park of the Department of Oceanography.

Mitchell Groth, a senior in Journalism, will continue his evaluation of educational methods in "Classroom Testing of Hands-on Space Science Resource Activities." Mitchell's work supports NASA's educational goals to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology. In addition, teachers involved in this study will acquire new activities for their classrooms consistent with national and state science education goals and standards. His work is being conducted under mentor Dr. Karen Meech of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Leeward Community College:

Patty Mata and Roy Smith, both sophomores in Computer Science, will be observing the Moon, nebulae, and galaxies at the Leeward Community College Observatory in conjunction with Bishop Museum Planetarium programs. Working with mentor, Dr. Fritz Osell of the Astronomy Department, Patty and Roy's project, called "LCC and Bishop Museum: the Astronomy Connection," will provide newly acquired images to enhance the presentation of planetarium programs.

 

Maui Community College:

Brian Africano and Becky McCartney, both sophomores in Liberal Arts, and Cynthia Cater, a sophomore in Computer Science, are working together on "Automated Astronomical Observations Using the RAVEN System at the Maui Research and Technology Park." Their work looks at the feasibility of using automated, smaller telescopes for observing, data collection, and analysis in placeof larger, more expensive research telescopes. Mentors for this project include Drs. John Africano, Dave Talent, Daron Nishimoto, Paul Sydney, Dan O'Connell, and Amor Angara.

 

 

Spring 2018 Undergraduate Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Spring of 1998 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend of $750 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Sahnybel Tan, a junior in Zoology, will work as an undergraduate trainee under the direction of mentor Dr. Ernest Reese of the Department of Zoology. Following her interests in marine biology, Sahnybel will receive training in the behavioral ecology of coral reef fishes.

Sheldon Kono, Liberal Arts freshman, will work as an undergraduate trainee in the field of meteorology. He will develop a data base to study the occurrence of flash flooding in Hawaii. His mentor is Dr. Steven Businger of the Department of Meteorology.

 

Spring 1998 Graduate Fellowships 

The Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium awarded graduate fellowships to students at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa for 1997-98. The awards were given for space-related research and provided nine-month stipends and additional funds for travel and supplies to each recipient.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Julie Field, Master's degree student in Anthropology, is researching "A New Perspective on Warfare: Remote Sensing and GIS in Fiji." Julie is using digital image processing techniques on high-resolution, multispectral satellite images along with aerial photographs to build a database of topography, vegetation, and archaeological sites in the Sigatoka Valley of Viti Levu, Fiji. With this GIS database, she is analyzing relationships between geography, human expansion, and inter-group aggression and competition. Her mentor is Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology.

Kathleen Moore, PhD student in Physiology, is investigating the effects of sodium intake on bone morphometry, bone strength, and blood pressure. Her research project, called "The Effect of Dietary Salt in Genetically-Defined Unloading Model," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Martin Rayner of the Department of Physiology. Kathleen's laboratory analyses may ultimately lead to better understanding of the effects of salt intake on human bone fragility and, in turn, improved health for astronauts on long-duration space missions.

Lewis Pinault, JD candidate at the Richardson School of Law, brings together his interests in natural science, space remote sensing, and environmental law in his project, "Law and Policy Aspects of Remote Sensing for Natural Hazards." He will examine remote sensing data from Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines and use this as a case study to analyze how satellite images can inform and impact people affected by natural hazards. Lewis will create law and policy guidelines for using and communicating remote sensing data about natural hazards which may ultimately lead to more practical mitigation plans. His mentor is Dr. Pete Mouginis-Mark of HIGP & the Department of Geology & Geophysics.

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Spring 1997
Spring 1997 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1997 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 1997 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Community Colleges. At Manoa, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $1750 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Gay Leong, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will work with Dr. Mehrdad Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on "Fabrication and Testing of an Active Strut for Space Structures." Gay's work will include the testing of voltage-displacement responses of miniature active struts designed by former Space Grant Fellows.

Mike Kobayakawa, also a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on "Optical Sensor Based Intelligent Control for Space Robotic Systems." Mike's objective is to determine the factors influencing the accuracy, reliability, and utility of laser triangulation devices which he will then integrate with an intelligent control system designed by a former Space Grant Fellow. Mike's mentor is Dr. Junku Yuh of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

David Matsuda, a junior in Anthropology will be using Landsat imagery to study the best preserved dryland agricultural field system in Kohala, Hawaii and to relate agricultural expansion to environmental and social factors. David's research project, called "Remote Sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and the Archaeology of Kohala, Hawai'i Island" is being conducted under mentor Dr. Michael Graves of the Department of Anthropology.

Leeward Community College:

Susan Krueger a sophomore in Science Education, and Natalie Clark-Maggitt, a sophomore in Science and Human Behavior, will develop astronomy projects using the Leeward Community College Observatory and the Internet to link students for collaborative astronomy activities. Their project, called "Development of Observatory Projects for Elementary Schools Utilizing Collaboration Efforts with Undergraduate College Students," is being conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. Fritz Osell of the Astronomy Department.

Candis Cooper a sophomore in Science Education, and freshman Shaun Shiraishi will be working with mentor Dr. Kakaala Mohanan of the Astronomy Dpeartment on a "Photometric Study of the Comet Hale-Bopp using CCD Camera." Candis and Shaun will collect data on the comet's brightness, rotational period, and nucleus. Color filters used with the CCD camera will allow further study of the ion and dust tail properties of the comet.

Patty Mata and Roy Smith, both freshmen in Computer Science, will be observing and measuring eruptions in accreting binary star systems at the Leeward Community College Observatory. Working with mentor, Dr. Kahaala Mohanan of the Astronomy Department, Patty and Roy's project, called "Eruptive Star Photometery for Research and Education," will be coordinated with observing schedules of undergraduate astronomy courses to provide those students with hands-on research experience.

Melinda McKinney, a sophomore in Physics and Nathan Mariels, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will be working on an "Evaluation of Nickel-titanium Based, Shape-changing Alloys for Use in Robotics Design for Space Application." Under the guidance of mentor Dr. Tim Burns of the Physics and Engineering Department, Melinda and Nathan will evaluate the use of actuators made of nickel-titanium based, shape-changing alloys in light-weight robotic arms for use in space.

Maui Community College:

Brian Africano, a freshman in Liberal Arts, will be working on the "Maui Space Surveillance Project" under the guidance of Dr. John Pye of the Physical Sciences Department. Brian will use several different telescopes to find, track, image, and catalog objects in space including satellites, Earth-crossing asteroids, and orbiting space debris.

 

Spring 1997 Undergraduate Traineeships 

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Spring of 1997 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend of $750 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Keith Hamasaki, a senior in Physics, will study processes in particle physics and receive training in computer analysis and simulation. Under the guidance of mentor Dr. Fred Harris of the Department of Physics, High Energy Physics Group, Keith will study the decay of psi prime particles using data collected by the Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BES) experiment.

April Gumayagay, a sophomore, will be working with mentor Dr. Luke Flynn of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology's Planetary Geosciences group for training in remote sensing. April will learn about the uses and mission operations of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) for studying active volcanic eruptions.

 

Spring 1997 Undergraduate Fellowships 

The Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium awarded graduate fellowships to students at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa for 1996-97. The awards were given for space-related research and provided nine-month stipends and additional funds for travel and supplies to each recipient.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

James Lee, Master's degree student in Electrical Engineering, is researching "Actuator and Sensor Placement for Robust Control of Flexible Structures." James' theoretical H_ analyses will help determine the optimal methods for suppressing unwanted oscillations or vibrations of large flexible structures in space. His mentor is Dr. Vassilis Syrmos of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Michael Sawyer, PhD student in Physical Oceanography, is continuing his research on the interactions between atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. His research project, called "Forcing and Dynamics of the North Equatorial Front," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Pierre Flament of the Department of Oceanography. Michael's analyses of in situ measurements and remote sensing data, from SIR-C and ERS-1 scatterometer, will lead to a better understanding of the small-scale structure and dynamics of surface temperature fronts in the equatorial Pacific region.

Spring 1996
Spring 1996 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1996 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Spring of 1996 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and the Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of up to $1750 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Christopher Frost, a junior in the Geology and Geophysics Department, has a whole world to study this semester under his project called "Dating Impact Craters on the Moon." After spending last semester looking at Clementine data of impact craters at the Apollo 16 landing site, his attention now turns to the rest of the Moon. His mentor Dr. Paul Lucey has developed a technique for estimating the relative ages of different craters using Clementine data, so that a chronology for these impact events can be derived.

Michael Larson, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will be continuing a series of Space Grant Fellows' projects in his investigation called "Development of an Active Control System for Smart Composite Material Space Structures." Under his mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad, Michael will help develop automatic control systems for spacecraft. This will involved the use of "smart materials" tailored to provide combinations of sensor, information processor, actuator, and feed-back/feed-forward functions within the materials.

Grace Leung also a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will work on another aspect of space structures in her project called "Design, Manufacture, and Testing of an Active Strut with Active Vibration Suppression Capabilities." With her mentor Dr. M. N. Ghasemi Nejhad, Grace will attempt to miniaturize some of the piezoelectric systems that have been developed by former Space Grant Fellows. Vibration testing of this miniaturized system will also be done to see how well it can withstand the rigors of space travel.

Cory Machida, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, will study the effects of gravity on the solidification of advanced materials such as metal alloys and composites. His project is called "Gravity Effects in Solidification Processing of Advanced Materials." With his mentor Dr. Chao-Yang Wang, Cory will develop a visualization experiment that will help understand the microstructure and chemical heterogeneities in castings that are used for space hardware.

Donn Murakami, a continuing Fellow in Electrical Engineering, is performing research on "The Robust Control of Flexible Manipulators in Space." He is designing robust controllers attempt to optimize control characteristics when only an approximate model of the flexible structure is available. These controllers will eliminate significant errors in position and velocity of flexible space structures, including long mechanical arms that are used in the recovery of small satellites. Donn's mentor is Dr. Rahul Chattergy, Mechanical Engineering.

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Dana Caccamise II, a senior in Geology, will continue his study "Sub-Grid Variability of Climate Related Land-Surface Characteristics" under the mentorship of Dr. Jene Michaud. Dana's objectives are to characterize the spatial heterogeneity of land surface characteristics that are most important in land-atmosphere interactions. Using satellite data for the U.S. mainland, emphasis will be placed on vegetation effects which influence surface soil moisture and the soil profiles.

David Phillips, a Geology major, will be working with Dr. Michael Bevis from Manoa's Institute of Geophysics and Planetology on his project "Applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to Enhance and Ground Truth Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry from Space". This entails the placement of several GPS instruments on the flanks of Kilauea volcano, and the comparison of the displacement data with observations made via orbital radar interferometry. Information on the distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere will also be retrieved from these GPS measurements.

Lonnie Snyder, a Biology student, is continuing his research on "The Effects of Gravitational Forces on the Isolation, Identification, and Morphology of Bacterial Colonies" under the guidance of mentor Dr. John Chan. Lonnie's research will help determine the effects of gravity on the growth and development of micro-organisms, which will enable biologists to predict what changes should be expected in microbial populations during space flight. Such research is important because ultimately we will need to protect future crews of the Space Station from microbe contamination.

 

Leeward Community College:

Gene Toyama and Jan Saiki, who are both majoring in science education, will work with students from Campbell High School to stimulate interest in astronomy among high school students. It is hoped that by using the astronomical telescopes at Leeward CC and Poamoho, they will be able to guide junior astronomers as they prepare science fair projects and develop their own astronomical research programs.

Elisa Amantiad, Civil Engineering student, will spend a second semester of her project "Beach Profile of Kaiaka-Waialua Bay Areas on the Internet" investigating the use of aircraft remote sensing data for the Kaiaka Bay region of Oahu. This project is connected to Hawaii Space Grant's "Virtually Hawaii" Internet project, and the results of Elisa's investigation will help show how high resolution multi-spectral images can illustrate the distribution of sediments off the coast of Oahu. By placing these data on the Internet, it is also hoped that other groups outside Hawaii will also see some of the applications of remote sensing for coastal resource management.

Preston Freitas, a sophomore in Astronomy, will continue his project called "Software Development for Undergraduate Astronomy Courses". The programs that he is developing emphasize the connections between diverse topics in astronomy as they are taught at Leeward. One project is focused on the life cycle of a star, while the second examines some of the more exotic phenomena in space, such as black holes. A third program will enable students to utilize the Drake Equation to estimate the number of civilizations existing in the Galaxy.

Spring 1995
Spring 1995 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1995 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jonathan Heraux
Consequences of a Nutrient Delivery System Designed for Zero-gravity Situations
Department of Biology
Mentor: Dr. Guillermo Goldstein

Chris Okubo
Mapping Lava Flows by Remote Sensing of Vegetation Zones
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Patricia Cooper

Philippe Rolland
In-flight Calibration of Shortwave Channels for Weather Satellites
Department of Meteorology
Mentor: Dr. John Porter

Steven Valin
The Noninvasive Determination of Regional Body Fluid Dynamics: A Design Based on Impedance Measurement Techniques
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Frank Koide

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

James Amendolagine
Astrolab 2000, A Computer-based Component to Astronomy 110 Laboratory
Department of Computer Science
Mentor: Dr. Richard Weis

Michele Dodge
Classification of Terrestrial and Venusian Shield Volcanoes Based on Tectonic Surface Features
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Carl Johnson

Gail Loeffler
Curriculum Development and Support for the Classroom Astronomy Program
Department of Natural Sciences
Mentor: Dr. Richard Crowe

Marlea Steelman
Astrolab 2000: A Computer-based Astronomy Lab with a Hypertext User Interface
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Mentor: Dr. Richard Weis

Alys Wall
Landuse Change and Deforestation in the Puna District, Island of Hawaii: Using Remotely Sensed Data
Department of Geography
Mentor: Dr. Jim Juvik

Spring 1994
Spring 1994 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1994 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Carl Chun
Low Frequency Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Noise Model for Oscillator Phase Noise Simulations
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Joy Lasker

Kala Crow and Jeffrey Yee
Preliminary Anlysis of a Tripropellant Engine: An Alternative Propulsion System for the McDonnell Douglas Delta Clipper
Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. K. M. Htun

Jonathan Deenik
Mapping Vegetation in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park by Integrating Thematic Mapper Data with Ground Truth
Agronomy
Mentor: Dr. Matthew McGranaghan (Geography)

Richard Eliason
Radiometric Calibration of the Planetary Geosicences Spectrogoniometer Facility
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Kin-Wo (Kevin) Fong
Instrumentation and Signal Processing for Smart Composite Materials Space Structures
Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad

Michael Guidry
Global Proterozoic Environmental Change
Biology/Marine Science
Mentor: Dr. Fred Mackenzie (SOEST)

Die Ren (Danny) Li
Infrared Radiative Properties of Polyetherimide Thermoplastic Films for Space Applications
Mechanical Engineering
Mentors: Dr. Patrick Phelan and Dr. Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad

Anthony Montgomery
Otolith Research: A Satellite-based Ecological Project
Zoology
Mentor: Dr. Richard Radtke

Angela Neal
Long-duration Space Flight: The Effects of Stress upon Salivary Neurotransmitter
Biochemistry/Biophysics
Mentors: Dr. Bruce Morton

Tracy Smith
Computer Aided Design of Spacecraft Control Systems
Electrical Engineering
Mentors: Dr. Vassilis Syrmos

James Smythe
Packaging of Electronics in Space
Electrical Engineering
Mentors: Dr. Rahul Chattergy

Roland Tokumi
Computer Animation and Scientific Visualization
Computer Science/Math
Mentors: Dr. Stephen Itoga

Jason Woycke
Satellite Data Analysis of Lower Silesia, Csechoslovakia
Geology/Geophysics
Mentors: Dr. Scott Rowland (HIGP)

Jeffrey Yee and Kala Crow
Preliminary Anlysis of a Tripropellant Engine: An Alternative Propulsion System for the McDonnell Douglas Delta Clipper
Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. K. M. Htun

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Michele Dodge
Classification of Terrestrial and Venusian Shield Volcanoes Based on Tectonic Surface Features
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Carl Johnson

Paula Morgan
CCD Photometry of Elliptical Galazies in the Virgo Cluster
Physics/Math
Mentors: Dr. Richard Crowe

Thomas Nishino
Non-linear Dynamics, Chaos, and the Kirkwood Gaps
Physics/Astronomy
Mentors: Dr. Walter Steiger

Susan Smith
Trends in Dry Forest Habitat Fragmentation for the World's Rarest Land Tortoise: Change Detection Using Remote Sensing
Geography
Mentors: Dr. James Juvik

Spring 1993
Spring 1993 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1993 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Puanani Akaka
Lunar Sample Educational Disc: The Movie
Film Production major
Mentor: Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor (HIGP)

Thomas Birchard
Analysis of Satellite Data to Delineate the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Eastern Pacific
Department of Meteorology
Mentor: Dr. Pao-Shin Chu

Delwyn Ching
Fractal Dimensional Analysis of Impact Craters on Mars
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor

Josette Germano and Lori-ann Takizawa
An Image Oriented, Lunar Spectral Database
Business/Finance major and Secondary Education major
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Nina Paige Hadley
Applications of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data to the Study of Cloud Frequency Over the Hawaiian Islands
Marine Science
Mentor: Dr. Peirre Flament

Joseph Laurel
GIS Mapping Techniques for Planetary Application
Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Matt McGranaghan (Geography)

Deborah Miyasaka
The Elder Astronaut: Age Limits and Expected Functional Declines
Center on Aging and Department of Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Max Vercruyssen

Vanesa Murray
Arousal and Cognitive Function: Operator Posture Considerations for Workstation Designs
Center on Aging and Department of Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Max Vercruyssen

Dana Nakashima
Manipulation of Biological Systems to Enhance Anhydrobiotic Survival and Achieve Suspended Animation
Department of Zoology
Mentor: Dr. Christopher Womersley

Jennifer Parker
A Remote Sensing Study of Karthala Volcano, W. Indian Ocean
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

Lori-ann Takizawa and Josette Germano
An Image Oriented, Lunar Spectral Database
Secondary Education major and Business/Finance major
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Steven E. Valin
The Noninvasive Determination of Regional Body Fluid Dynamics in Microgravity: A Design Based on Impedance Measurement Techniques
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Frank Koide

Cynthia A. Wilburn
Analysis of a Multispectral Scanner Time Series of the Northern Caspian Sea: Determining the Effects of Rapid Sea-level Rise
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Derek A. Yamamoto
A Study of Surface Deterioration of Airfield Runways for Space Vehicles
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Mentor: Dr. W. Pong

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Lois Sanekane
Navigational Techniques of the Past and Present
Department of Biology
Mentor: Dr. Marlene Hapai

Erin Thompson
Demonstration Spectroscope and Research Survey Spectrograph
Department of Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Wayne Wack
Photometric and CCD Investigation of Asteroid Geometry
Department of Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. William Hartmann (Planetary Sciences Institute)

Spring 1992
Spring 1992 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1992 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Omar Abing
SPACE: School Projects for Astronomy in Space Electronics
Department of Education
Mentors: Dr. Lawrence Zane and Dr. Frank Pottenger

Charlotte Albert-Thenet
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Robert Cole

Fides Amor Angara
Sunspot Seismology
Department of Physics
Mentor: Dr. Douglas Braun

Karen Balabis
MSS of the Caspian Sea
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Gordon Clendenen
Use of Remote Sensing and Computer Generated Animation to Provide Dynamic Visualization of Tropical Environment Climatic Data
Environmental Studies
Mentor: Dr. Kent Bridges (Botany)

Robert Contreras
Stellar Formation
Math/Physics
Mentor: Dr. David Saunders

Kris Hamada
Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Edward DeLuca

Joy Ishigo
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Joel Fox (Mechanical Engineering)

Paul Johnson
High Pressure Fractionation of Kolekole Volcanics, Oahu: A Terrestrial Analog of Magmatic Processes and Planetary Interiors
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. John Sinton

Park McGraw
Improving the Efficiency of Astronomical Spectrographs
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Alan Stockton

Lauri Saiki
Computer Simulations of Atom Hopping in Solid H2
Physics
Mentor: Dr. James Gaines

Karen Sender
Comparison of Continental and Oceanic Rifting Using Spaceborne and Marine Remote Sensing Techniques
Geology/Geophysics
Mentors: Dr. Brian Taylor and Dr. Fernando Martinez

Cynthia Wilburn
Analysis of a MSS Time Series of the N. Caspian Sea, USSR: Determining the Effects of Rapid Sea-level Rise
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Christina Xavier
Developing a Teaching Curriculum on Marine Applications of Satellite and Airborne Remote Sensing
Biology
Mentor: Dr. Sherwood Maynard

Philip Yogi
The Dynamics of the 1991 Mr. Pinatubo Eruption Cloud as Seen From Weather Satellites
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Steven Self

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

William Blackston
Quadratic Dynamics of Nonlinear Orbits
Math/Physics
Mentor: Dr. Arthur Sagle

Normand Dionne
A Chaotic Impact Oscillator Model for Pulsating Variable Stars
Computer Science/Math
Mentor: Dr. James Walker and Dr. Richard Crowe

Jon Hayashi
Panoramic CCD Imaging with the 24" Telescopes
Physics
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Darrell Howard
Design and Construction of Cassegrain Adaptor for a CCD Camera on the 24" Telescope
Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. Robert Fox

Tim Stimple
Hawaii Space Industry Career Planning
Computer Science
Mentor: Dr. April Komenaka

Spring 1991
Spring 1991 Undergraduate Participants

Spring 1991 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Charlotte Albert-Thenet
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Robert Cole

Robert Contreras
Stellar Formation
Math/Physics
Mentor: Dr. David Saunders

Christopher Elders
Exercise as a Countermeasure in the Prevention of Disuse Osteoporosis and Physical Deconditioning in Space
Exercise Science
Mentor: Dr. Ronald Hetzler

Annette Hoffman
Distribution and Physical Properties of Cometary Dust
Math
Mentor: Dr. David Jewitt (Astronomy)

Joy Ishigo
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Forrest Buzan

Paul Johnson
Geologic Teleprospector Feasibility Study: Geologic Design
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. John Sinton

Scott Moncrief
Remote Sensing Hawaiian Lava Flows with Thermal Infrared Images
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

Lawrence Norris
Lunar Resources: The Key to Near Earth Exploration
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. B. Ray Hawke

Paraluman Stice
Comparative Analysis of Terrestrial and Martian Volcanic Features using Multispectral Thermal Infrared Images, Aerial Photographs, and Viking Images
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

Michelle Tatsumura
Magellan Images of Venus
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Patricia Cooper

Christina Xavier
Developing a Teaching Curriculum on Marine Applications of Satellite and Airborne Remote Sensing
Biology
Mentor: Dr. Sherwood Maynard

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Phillip Bisel
Remote Seising in Geography
Geography
Mentor: Dr. Ron Terry

John Gathright
Search for Non-stellar Objects in Eclipsing Binary Systems
Physics
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Huihui Kanahele-Mossman
Asrtronomy Curriculum for Na Pua Noeau
Computer Science
Mentors: Dr. Manu Meyer and Dr. Will Kyselka

Daniel Vaughn
Martian Phreatomagmatic Systems
Geology
Mentor: Dr. James Anderson

Donald Yancey
Ultraviolet Radiation Tolerance of Microorganisms on Top of Mauna Kea
Premedicine
Mentor: Dr. Fred Stone (Biology)

Fall 1999
Fall 1999 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1999 Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 1999 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Mary Jean Sistoso, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work on satellite transmit/receive modules. She will design, fabricate, and test two key components in her project, titled "High-Efficiency Amplifier and Oscillator." Serving as mentor for this project is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Mary Jean's research on efficient components could lead to lower heat dissipation, weight, and cost of satellites.

Robert Tomasetti, a senior in Zoology, will carry on his research with mentor, Dr. Marlin Atkinson of the Department of Oceanography, on "Analyzing Reflective Spectra of Corals for Use in Remote Sensing." Robert's use of High Performance Liquid Chromatography on coral pigments has practical applications to mapping the distribution of species along reef zones with remote sensing data.

Gregory Kodani, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is continuing his project to improve power and efficiency of millimeter-wave-frequency remote sensing systems. Gregory's project is titled, "Microelectromechanical System Components: Variable Capacitor Design Effectiveness and Reliability." His mentor is Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Megaan Clark, a senior in Biology (Pre-Med), will continue her work with mentor, Dr. Max Vercruyssen of the Department of Medicine, on assessing the abilities of individuals to react quickly to environmental stimuli, especially as applied to fitness for astronaut duty. Megaan's project, titled "Elder Astronaut: Development of a Fitness for Duty Test Battery" relates a person's time perception, movement speed, coordination, and information processing skills to his or her fitness to pilot spacecraft.

Kendall Ching, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on optimizing the efficiency, while reducing the size, of microwave integrated circuits using photonic-bandgap technology. Kendall's project, "Multilayer Photonic Bandgap Integrated Circuits," may ultimately lead to better instrumentation for space communications and remote sensing.

Leon Geschwind, a senior in Global Environmental Science, will continue working with mentor, Dr. Luke Flynn of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, using satellite thermal data to study volcanic activity on Earth. Leon's project, titled "Monitoring Real Time Volcanic Events" includes the remote monitoring of heat signatures of volcanoes, particularly Kilauea, as a predictive tool for eruptions. Leon will also conduct ground-truth tests on Kilauea.

Wendi Maeda, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will research miniature optical devices in her project, titled "Optical Attenuators on a Single Chip." Working with mentor, Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Wendi's work is relevant to the growing need for smaller and more efficient optical signal processing devices on satellites.

Kevin Magnuson, a senior in Chemistry, will carry on his work on the synthesis and kinetic analysis of sodium aluminum hydride compounds in his project titled, "Hydrogen Storage for Spacecraft." Under the direction of mentor, Dr. Craig Jensen of the Department of Chemisry, Kevin's research is important to the development of new, on-board hydrogen storage systems to be used for spacecraft fuel.

Jeff Chang, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will research the use of Microelectromechanical System impedance tuners to reduce the loss of power in the matching network for high-frequency applications. His project is titled "Miniature Impedance Tuner for High Frequency Transmitters." Under the direction of mentor, Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Jeff's work has practical applications to the satellite industry.

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

  • Gail Ostrander, a senior in Geology, will study surficial soil moisture using visible and thermal data from the AVHRR satellite. Gail's project, titled, "Sensitivity analysis of the NDVI-Snapshot Method Applied Using AVHRR Data" will include three locations with different climates and hydrologic conditions. Mentor for this project is Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology.

  • Tobias Hewitt, a senior in Geology, will research the mineralogy of lava tubes in an effort to assess the potential for using specific minerals to distinguish tubes from channels in remote sensing data of volcanic fields. Tobias' project, titled "Magnesioferrite Formation Within Lava Tubes" will be performed under mentor Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology.

  • Ogden Ingalls, a sophomore in Physics, will be working with mentor Dr. William Heacox of the Department of Physics and Astronomy on applying statistical models to a study of masses of halo dark objects. Ogden will aim to better understand dark matter-gravitational lensing in the Magellanic Cloud in a project titled "Microlensing."

  Kapi'olani Community College:

  • Eric Bott, a sophomore in History, will be working on a project to produce a movie of daily sunspot activity during a 3-month period using the 12" Schmitt-Cassigrain, Meade telescope at KCC. This study corresponds with the current Solar maximum - a time of maximum frequency of sunspot activity. Dr. John Rand of the Department of Math and Science is serving as mentor for Eric's project, titled "Daily Sunspot Observations."

  • Michael Hall, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will be working with mentor, Dr. John Rand, KCC Pre-Engineering Program Director, on a project titled, "Construction of a Homemade CCD Camera." Michael will gain valuable experience with the design, fabrication, and testing of the mechanical and electrical systems of a CCD camera. His camera will ultimately be used on the Meade telescope at KCC.

Windward Community College:

Kimberly Andersen, a junior in Geology, will be working with mentors, Dr. David Krupp of the Biology Department and Dr. Floyd McCoy of the Geology Department, on a study of sand, coral, and algae composition and distribution in Kaneohe Bay, O'ahu in relation to airborne remote sensing data. Kimberly will use GPS to record site locations. The title of her project is, "Determining the Correlations Between Hyperspectral Images and Substrate Type in Kaneohe Bay."

Henry Skinner, a senior in Zoology, will be researching "Variations in Physiochemical Properties of He`eia Stream." Henry will monitor water quality from a variety of stations to analyze the effects of the marsh and mangrove swamp on the stream's temperature, chemistry, conductivity, salinity, turbidity, and suspended solids. GPS and GIS software will be used to map the data-collection stations. Dr. David Krupp, of the Biology Department, will serve as mentor.

Fall 1999 Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Fall of 1999 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend of $1,000 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Darren Goshi, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will be working in the field of telecommunications with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Darren will receive training on the fabrication and measurement of a quasi-optical diode-grid modulator array.

Evan Hajime, a senior in Chemistry, will gain practical experience in the synthesis of silicon and metal-enhanced silicon nanoparticles. These super crystals of semiconductor materials may have important applications in new, space-based electronics. Evan's mentor is Dr. David Harwell of the Department of Chemistry.

Elaine Lampitoc, a senior in Geology, will work with mentor, Dr. Scott Rowland of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology to learn geologic interpretation techniques using a variety of remote sensing images of the cinder cones on Mauna Kea.

Georgiana Young, a junior in Geology, will gain practical skills in digital image processing and mapping under the guidance of mentor, Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark of the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. Georgiana will use satellite images of Mars in her analyses.

Fall 1998
Fall 1998 Undergraduate Participants

 

Fall 1998 Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 1998 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $3000 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Jessica Hiraoka Aided Testing (CAT) of a Piezoelectric Active Strut for Space Structures using LabVIEW Software." Working under mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jessica's objective is to develop software for automatic application of voltage during testing and operation of miniature active struts designed and fabricated by former Space Grant Fellows.

Sheldon Kono, a sophomore in Meteorology is continuing his research on the atmosphere which he began as a summer fellow. His project, titled "Using GPS Technology to Probe the Atmosphere" has applications to climatological studies of water vapor in the atmosphere and precipitation observations in Hawai`i and the Mainland. Sheldon's mentor is Dr. Steven Businger of the Department of Meteorology.

David Ishimitsu, a junior majoring in Mathematics, will work with mentor, Dr. Brent Tully of the Department of Astromony, on "Mapping the Universe." David's project will produce a three-dimensional map of our Local Supercluster of galaxies which may lead to better understanding of the mass distribution and large-scale structure of the universe.

Kevin Leong, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is working in the field of space-based communication and sensor systems with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Kevin's project, titled "Quasi-Optical Linearizer" involves the use of a new, quasi-optical, linearizer component for improved efficiency and output power when sending and receiving signals in space.

Dan Sakata, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, is continuing his work, titled "Trouble-Shooting, Assembly, and Testing of a Piezoelectric Active Strut for Space Structures," under the guidance of mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Dan plans to test the active struts in inchworm and no-inchworm modes with and without loading.

Andrew Guyette, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will be researching the use of quasi-optical techniques to ultimately define a single antenna capable of both high-gain and low-gain operation in space. Andrews's project, titled "Quasi-Optical Power Amplifier" will be performed under the guidance of mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Tuan Ha, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is using the VHDL programming language to design a decoder system for research on high-speed communications over satellite channels. His project, titled "Design of a Decoder System for Reliable High-Speed Satellite Communication," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Gregory Uehara of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

John Mazotta, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is working under the guidance of mentor Dr. Jung-Chih Chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project titled, "High-Speed Quasi-Optical Beam Steerer." John's research focuses on a new electronic beam-steering method for quasi-optical transmitters and receivers suitable for remote sensing and satellite communication systems.

Daniel Sherwood, a senior in Meteorology is continuing a study of "Optical Depth Variability in the Central Pacific" with his mentor, Dr. Anthony Clarke of the Department of Oceanography. Daniel is using photometric data collected at sea level and at the Mauna Loa Observatory to assess the temporal changes in aerosol optical depth in the atmosphere within and above the Pacific Marine Boundary Layer. This information benefits remote sensing studies of the oceans, atmosphere, and climate.

Jason Hall, a senior in Mechanical Engineering will be working with mentor, Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on advanced materials for space structures. His project is titled "Processing and Performance of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCCs) using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) and Polymer Pyrolysis." Jason plans to manufacture CFCCs and examine samples , after mechanical testing at different temperatures, with a scanning electron microscope.

Gregory Kodani, a junior in Electrical Engineering, will work on a project to improve power and efficiency of millimeter-wave-frequency remote sensing systems. Gregory's project is titled, "MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) Variable Capacitors." His mentor is Dr. Jung-Chih chiao of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Kimo Marion, a junior in Biosystems Engineering, will be investigating the effectiveness of marine alga species in enhancing a closed environment life support system for space habitats. Working under the direction of mentor Dr. Loren Gautz of the Department of Biosystems Engineering, Kimo's project title is "A CELSS Simulator to Evaluate Marine Algae for Space Research."

William Forsyth, a senior in Electrical Engineering, will work on a project aimed at improving bandwidth efficiency of radio wave transmissions in space with a new equalizer design. William's research, titled "High Frequency Transmission Line Equalizer" will be conducted under mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Peter Ammerman, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, completed a summer fellowship project titled "Magnetorheological Material Based Torque Transmission Clutches." The work relates to the use of applied magnetic fields to adjust torque transmission clutches in space hardware. Mentor for this project was Dr. Melek Yalcintas of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

 

University of Hawai`i at Hilo:

Susie Shaw, a senior in Geology, will conduct field work on Kilauea Volcano to collect spectral reflectance data. Susie's project, titled, "Field Determination of Visible to Near IR Spectral Characteristics of Basaltic Surfaces and Sulfur Mineral Coatings: Application of Natural Spectra to Remote Sensing to Io" will be guided by mentor Dr. Ken Hon of the Department of Geology.

Joanne Snow, a senior in Chemistry, will be working with mentor Dr. Edward Herlicska of the Department of Chemistry on fullerene chemistry, which is important to studies of carbon in extraterrestrial materials. Joanne will aim to synthesize known and new derivatives of fulleride C 60 in a project titled, " Synthesis and Characterization of Buckminsterfullerene Derivatives."

Jessica Powers, a junior in Astronomy, will be acquiring observations on Mauna Kea and conducting research to study the initial stages of star formation. Jessica's project, titled "High-Resolution Imaging/Modelling of Circumstellar Disks" will be performed under mentor Dr. Gerald Moriarty-Schieven of the Joint Astronomy Centre.

 

Honolulu Community College:

Sean Rosemary Keefe, a sophomore pre-Engineering major, will be working on a project using remote sensing data to detect the extent of burning-induced deforestation of the Amazon rainforest. The title of her project is "Remote Sensing of Brazilian Biomass Burning Using GOES Data." Her mentor is Dr. Ronald Takata of the Chemistry Department.

 

Leeward Community College:

Elin Howard and Jonathan Wilkins, both sophomores in Science Education, will summarize the astronomy projects at LCC Observatories serving undergraduates, pre-college students, and the public. Working with mentor, Dr. Fritz Osell of the Astronomy Department, Elin and Jonathan will produce a comprehensive archiving system for astronomy projects and images.

 

Windward Community College:

Kapono Ciotti, a liberal arts major, will be working with mentor, Dr. Inge White of the Ethnobotany Department, on a study of native and non-native plants on Coconut Island in Kaneohe Bay, O'ahu. Kapono's field research of the types and locations of plants on the island will provide ground-truth information for a GIS/GPS ethnobotanical map.

 

 

Fall 1998 Undergraduate Traineeships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate traineeships in the Fall of 1998 to students at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The awards provided laboratory training and practical experience in any space-related field of science, engineering or math. Trainees received a stipend of $1,000 per semester.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

April Gumayagay, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will work with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering on a project to design and implement a data-acquisition system for measuring radiation patterns of an integrated active antenna.

Jason Day, a junior in Chemistry, will gain practical experience in synthesizing inorganic compounds and in using infrared and mass spectroscopy and magnetic resonance methods. Janson's mentor is Dr. David Harwell of the Department of Chemistry.

Kendall Ching, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, will be working in the field of telecommunications with mentor, Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Kendall will learn fabrication techniques for quasi-optical active antenna arrays.

Kristin Smith, a sophomore in Physics, will work with mentor Dr. David Tholen of the Institute for Astronomy to analyze data from Mauna Kea Observatories to characterize and determine orbits of small solar system bodies, expecially asteroids.

 

Fall 1998 Graduate Fellowships 

The Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium awarded graduate fellowships to students at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa for 1998-99. The awards were given for space-related research and provided nine-month stipends and additional funds for travel and supplies to each recipient.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Julie Field, PhD student in Anthropology, is continuing her research on "The Role of Geography in Prehistoric Aggression." Julie is using digital image processing techniques on high-resolution, multispectral satellite images along with aerial photographs to build a database of topography, vegetation, and archaeological sites in the Sigatoka Valley of Viti Levu, Fiji. With this GIS database, she is analyzing relationships between geography, human expansion, and inter-group aggression and competition. Her mentor is Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology.

Kathleen Moore, PhD student in Physiology, is continuing her investigation of the effects of sodium intake on bone morphometry, bone strength, and blood pressure. Her research project, "The Effect of Dietary Salt on Bone in a Genetically-Defined Rat Spaceflight Model," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Martin Rayner, Professor of Physiology. Kathleen's laboratory analyses may ultimately lead to better understanding of the effects of salt intake on human bone fragility and, in turn, improved health for astronauts on long-duration space missions.

Lewis Pinault, PhD candidate in Geology and Geophysics and JD candidate at the Richardson School of Law, is working on the nature of metal and sulfide minerals in shocked chondritic meteorites. These minerals are redistributed by shock waves generated by impacts on asteroids. The work will shed light on formation of mineral veins by impact processes, with implications for carbonate veins in martian meteorites and glassy silicate veins in lunar rocks and other types of meteorites. This research will also contribute to understanding the physical properties of asteroids, potentially useful information in planning future mining operations on asteroids. His mentor is Dr. Ed Scott of HIGP and the Department of Geology and Geophysics.

Fall 1997
Fall 1997 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1997 Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 1997 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Community Colleges. At Manoa, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of $1750 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Carl Lee, a senior in Mechanical Engineering, will continue work he began this summer on "Voltage Load-displacement Curve Evaluation of a Piezoelectric Active Strut for Space Structures." Working under mentor Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carl's objective is to establish the voltage-load-displacement curve for three miniature active struts designed and fabricated by former Space Grant Fellows.

Alan Tom, also a senior in Mechanical Engineering worked this summer with Dr. Melek Yalcintas of the Department of Mechanical Engineering on "Magnetorheological Material Based Adaptive Structures." Alan's work included the testing of vibration responses of magnetorheological (MR) materials at different levels of applied magnetic fields.

Melinda McKinney, a junior majoring in Physics and Mathematics, completed a summer fellowship "Petrographic Analysis of Martian Meteorites" under mentors Rachel Friedman and Dr. Edward Scott, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) and the Department of Geology and Geophysics (GG). Melinda's new fellowship research focuses on a mathematical model-computer simulation of the fractal nature of lava flow margins which ultimately may be used to determine eruption rates of lava flows on Earth and other planets. Her work , titled "Are Lava Flows in a State of Self-Organized Criticality?" will be performed under the guidance of mentor Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor of HIGP and GG.

Casey Law, a junior in Physics, is research-ing the relative age of globular cluster M71 with respect to other thick disk clusters in our Galaxy in a project called, "Examining the Relative Ages of Thick Disk Globular Clusters." Working under the direction of his mentor, Dr. James Heasley of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Casey will use photometric data obtained at telescopes on Mauna Kea and Kitt Peak National Observatory in his efforts to better understand the evolution of the Milky Way.

Jason Horiuchi, a senior in Electrical Engineering, studied "Grid Oscillators on Photonic-Bandgap Substrates" this summer under the guidance of mentor Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Jason analyzed the performance of a specialized grid oscillator fabricated with photonic-bandgap structures. Power devices such as these may prove to be ideal for use in space communications in the millimeter-wave frequencies.

David Matsuda, a senior in Anthropology, will continue his study of the relationship of agricultural expansion to environmental and social factors by focusing on the best preserved dryland agricultural field system in Kohala, Hawaii. David's research project, called "Remote Sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and the Archaeology of Kohala, Hawai'i Island" utilizes SIR-C , SPOT satellite images and GIS database. His work is being conducted under mentor Dr. Michael Graves of the Department of Anthropology.

Kevin Miyashiro, a senior in Electrical Engineering is studying "A Quasi-optical Beam Steerer." Serving as mentor for this project is Dr. Wayne Shiroma of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Kevin's program and analyses will help in the quest for optimal accuracy, performance, and reliability of spaceborne remote sensing instruments.

Mitchell Groth, a senior in Journalism, will evaluate educational methods in "Classroom Testing of Hands-on Space Science Resource Activities." Mitchell's work supports NASA's educational goals to "increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology" in addition to providing teachers with new activities that are consistent with national and state science education goals and standards. His work is being conducted under mentor Dr. Karen Meech of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Kristi Nishimura, a senior in Liberal Studies and Pre-Medicine, will work on an aspect of astronaut fitness by researching reaction time in individuals of various ages and skill levels. With mentor Dr. Max Vercruyssen from the Department of Medicine, Kristi will study "Fitness for Duty: Human Information Processing Limits and Vehicle Design Recommendations." This work will contribute to a better understanding of the most effective warning systems and displays (e.g., visual, audio, tactile) to employ on piloted spacecraft.

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

David Ford, a junior in Geology, will conduct an evaluation of the accuracy of a modified method for estimating soil moisture in agricultural areas from satellite data. David will incorporate surface temperature, precipitation levels, and vegetation data with spaceborne remote sensing data. His work is being conducted under mentor Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology.

 

Leeward Community College:

Daniel Benfield, a sophomore in Computer Science, will design and construct a server using Linux for operation of the new, remotely operated telescope system at LCC. His project is being conducted under the guidance of mentor Dr. Fritz Osell of the Astronomy Department.

Roy Smith, also a sophomore in Computer Science, will work under the guidance of mentor Dr. Fritz Osell to implement LCC Observatory projects with the Berkeley-based "Hands-on Universe" project.

 

 

Fall 1997 Graduate Fellowships

The Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium awarded graduate fellowships to students at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa for 1997-98. The awards were given for space-related research and provided nine-month stipends and additional funds for travel and supplies to each recipient.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

Julie Field, Master's degree student in Anthropology, is researching "A New Perspective on Warfare: Remote Sensing and GIS in Fiji." Julie will use digital image processing techniques on high-resolution, multispectral satellite images along with aerial photographs to build a database of topography, vegetation, and archaeological sites in the Sigatoka Valley of Viti Levu, Fiji. With this GIS database, she will analyze relationships between geography, human expansion, and inter-group aggression and competition. Her mentor is Dr. Terry Hunt of the Department of Anthropology.

Kathleen Moore, PhD student in Physiology, is investigating the effects of sodium intake on bone morphometry, bone strength, and blood pressure. Her research project, called "The Effect of Dietary Salt in Genetically-Defined Unloading Model," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Martin Rayner of the Department of Physiology. Kathleen's laboratory analyses may ultimately lead to better understanding of the effects of salt intake on human bone fragility and, in turn, improved health for astronauts on long-duration space missions.

Fall 1996
Fall 1996 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1996 Undergraduate Fellowships

The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium awarded undergraduate fellowships in the Fall of 1996 to students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and Hilo, and the Community Colleges. At Manoa and Hilo, the awards were given for space-related research and provided a stipend of up to $1750 per semester to each recipient. At the Community Colleges, Fellows received stipends that depended on the scope of the projects.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Arnold Fleischmann, a senior in Biology, will be studying the human body's way of relieving stress. He will conduct his project "Simulating Increased Serotonin Production and its Consequences During Space Flight Stress Using a Vigorous Exercise Paradigm" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Bruce Morton from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Arnold's research will involve the quantitative analysis of serotonin (one of the human body's neurotransmitters) present in the saliva of individuals before, during, and after exercise. Ultimately, a quantitative corrrelation of serotonin levels with increased levels of stress may lead to better methods of monitoring effects of stress on the human body and, in turn, improved health for astronauts on long-duration space missions.

Kimberly Siu, a senior in Liberal Studies, will work on another aspect of astronaut fitness: reaction time precision. With mentor Dr. Max Vercruyssen from the Department of Medicine, Kimberly will study "Critical Timing Maneuvers: Assessment and Screening of Fitness for Duty." Kimberly will use video driving simulations to test time perception and response speed of various individuals. This work will contribute to a better understanding of what characterizes peak performances of time-critical maneuvers.

Cory Machida is a continuing Fellow in Mechanical Engineering performing research on "Gravity Effects in Solidification Processing of Advanced Materials." His mentor is Dr. Chao-Yang Wang from the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Cory is developing a test cell to visually analyze the effects of gravity on flow patterns during solidification of an ammonium chloride solution which he is using as a metal-melt analog. This work will lead to better understanding of the microstructure and chemical heterogeneities in casting materials used for space hardware.

Andrea Kaawaloa, a senior in Geology and Geophysics, will continue her remote sensing and field study of inflation features on Hawaiian pahoehoe lava flows. Her project is called "Detailed Study of Inflation Features on the Highcastle Flow, Laeapuki, Hawai'i, with specifics on Tumuli." Andrea is collecting quantitative data on shape, appearance, and precise locations of tumuli and other inflation features to construct a detailed geologic map of the Highcastle Flow. This work will add to the overall understanding of volcanic landforms on Earth and may also help in the remote-sensing analysis of inflation features on other planetary surfaces. Andrea's mentor is Dr. Stephen Self from the Department of Geology and Geophysics.

Grace Leung, a senior in Electrical Engineering, is continuing her research on the miniaturization of piezoelectric mechanisms for precision positioning and vibration suppression of space structures. Grace is working on her project "Active Strut for Precision Positioning and Vibration Control of Space Truss Sturctures: Design, Manufacture, and Testing of an Active Composite Strut" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Mehrdad Nejhad of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

 University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Matthew Gentry, a senior in Geology, will be researching "Anthropogenically Induced Vegetation Change and its Impact on Evapotranspiration" under the guidance of mentor Dr. Jene Michaud of the Department of Geology. Matthew will use remote sensing data to map current vegetation patterns of the conterminous U. S. He will compare his map to historical records of pre-European-settlement vegetation patterns to determine the effects of human action on land cover. This will lead to an estimate of the impact that humans have had on climate, in particular evapotranspiration rates.

Leeward Community College:

Chris Richmond, a sophomore in Astronomy, and Isaac Holbron, a sophomore science education major, are working on a "Survey of Irregular Variable Star AD Leonis to Search for Flares." Chris and Isaac are using a differential photometry technique the telescope and CCD imaging system at Leeward Community College Observatory under the guidance of mentor Dr. Fritz Osell from the Astronomy Department. They are documenting chromispheric flares on AD Leonis, one of the most active stars in the northern hemisphere.

 

 

Fall 1996 Graduate Fellowships

The Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium awarded graduate fellowships to two students at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa for 1996. The awards were given for space-related research and provided nine-month stipends and additional funds for travel and supplies to each recipient.

University of Hawai`i at Manoa:

James Lee, Master's degree student in Electrical Engineering, will be researching "Actuator and Sensor Placement for Robust Control of Flexible Structures." James' theoretical H_ analyses will help determine the optimal methods for suppressing unwanted oscillations or vibrations of large flexible structures in space. His mentor is Dr. Vassilis Syrmos of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Michael Sawyer, PhD student in Physical Oceanography, will be continuing his research on the interactions between atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. His research project, called "Forcing and Dynamics of the North Equatorial Front," is being conducted under mentor Dr. Pierre Flament of the Department of Oceanography. Michael's analyses of in situ measurements and remote sensing data, from SIR-C and ERS-1 scatterometer, will lead to a better understanding of the small-scale structure and dynamics of surface temperature fronts in the equatorial Pacific region.

Fall 1995
Fall 1995 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1995 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Eric C. Bergmanis
Graduate fellow, Geology of the Southwest Rift Zone, East Maui Volcano
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. John Sinton

Christopher J. Frost
Dating Impact Craters on the Moon
Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey

Michael Lambert
Precision Positioning of Intelligent Space Structures Design and Manufacture of an Active Strut
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Gasemi Nejhad

Michael M. Masaki
Automated Testing of Integrated Circuits and Systems for High Speed Satellite Communications
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Gregory Uehara

Donn Murakami
The Robust Control of Flexible Manipulators in Space
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Rahul Chattergy

Gary S. Porter
Mapping the Filo Delgado Ignimbrite
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Stephen Self

Rafael Rivera
Theoretical Investigation of the Gravitational Effect on Smoldering Combustion
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Beei-Huan Chao

Christine L. Tsukamoto
Experimental Study on Neural Networks for Space Robot Control
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Junku Yuh

Lucy Wong
Active Vibration Suppression of Space Truss Structures: Design and Manufacture of Smart Composite Truss Element
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Gasemi-Nejhad

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Dana J. Caccamise II
Sub-Grid Variability of Climate-Related Land Surface Characteristics
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Jene Michaud

David A. Philips
Applications of the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to Enhancing and Ground Truthing Synthetic Aperture Radar )SAR) Interferometry from Space
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Michael Bevis (U.H. Manoa)

Fall 1994
Fall 1994 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1994 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Kevin Fong
Instrumentation and Signal Processing for Smart Composite Material Space Structures
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Gasemi Nejhad

Jonathan Heraux
Consequences of a Nutrient Delivery System Designed for Zero-gravity Situations
Department of Biology
Mentor: Dr. Guillermo Goldstein

Anthony Montgomery
Otolith Research: A Satellite-based Ecological Project Utilizing Remotely Sensed Data
Hawaii Institute of Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Richard Radtke

Chris Okubo
Mapping Lava Flows by Remote Sensing of Vegetation Zones
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Patricia Cooper

Steven Valin
The Noninvasive Determination of Regional Body Fluid Dynamics: A Design Based on Impedance Measurement Techniques
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Frank Koide

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

James Amendolagine
Astrolab 2000, A Computer-based Component to Astronomy 110 Laboratory
Department of Computer Science
Mentor: Dr. Richard Weis

Michele Dodge
Classification of Terrestrial and Venusian Shield Volcanoes Based on Tectonic Surface Features
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Carl Johnson

Gail Loeffler
Curriculum Development and Support for the Classroom Astronomy Program
Department of Natural Sciences
Mentor: Dr. Richard Crowe

Marlea Steelman
Astrolab 2000: A Computer-based Astronomy Lab with a Hypertext User Interface
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Mentor: Dr. Richard Weis

Alys Wall
Landuse Change and Deforestation in the Puna District, Island of Hawaii: Using Remotely Sensed Data
Department of Geography
Mentor: Dr. Jim Juvik

Fall 1993
Fall 1993 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1993 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Puanani Akaka
Lunar Sample Educational Disc: The Movie
Film Production major
Mentor: Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor (HIGP)

Thomas Birchard
Analysis of Satellite Data to Delineate the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Eastern Pacific
Department of Meteorology
Mentor: Dr. Pao-Shin Chu

Kala Crow and Jeffrey Yee
Preliminary Anlysis of a Tripropellant Engine: An Alternative Propulsion System for the McDonnell Douglas Delta Clipper
Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. K. M. Htun

Jonathan Deenik
Mapping Vegetation in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park by Integrating Thematic Mapper Data with Ground Truth
Agronomy
Mentor: Dr. Matthew McGranaghan (Geography)

Richard Eliason
Radiometric Calibration of the Planetary Geosicences Spectrogoniometer Facility
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Die Ren (Danny) Li
Infrared Radiative Properties of Polyetherimide Thermoplastic Films for Space Applications
Mechanical Engineering
Mentors: Dr. Patrick Phelan and Dr. Dr. Mehrdad Ghasemi Nejhad

Steven Valin
The Noninvasive Determination of Regional Body Fluid Dynamics in Microgravity
Electrical Engineering
Mentors: Dr. Frank Koide

Jeffrey Yee and Kala Crow
Preliminary Anlysis of a Tripropellant Engine: An Alternative Propulsion System for the McDonnell Douglas Delta Clipper
Mechanical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. K. M. Htun

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Michele Dodge
Classification of Terrestrial and Venusian Shield Volcanoes Based on Tectonic Surface Features
Department of Geology
Mentor: Dr. Carl Johnson

Paula Morgan
CCD Photometry of Elliptical Galazies in the Virgo Cluster
Physics/Math
Mentors: Dr. Richard Crowe

Thomas Nishino
Non-linear Dynamics, Chaos, and the Kirkwood Gaps
Physics/Astronomy
Mentors: Dr. Walter Steiger

Susan Smith
Trends in Dry Forest Habitat Fragmentation for the World's Rarest Land Tortoise: Change Detection Using Remote Sensing
Geography
Mentors: Dr. James Juvik

Fall 1992
Fall 1992 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1992 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Fides Amor Angara
Sunspot Seismology
Department of Physics
Mentor: Dr. Douglas Braun

Thomas Birchard
Analysis of Satellite Data to Delineate the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Eastern Pacific
Department of Meteorology
Mentor: Dr. Pao-Shin Chu

Delwyn Ching
Fractal Dimensional Analysis of Impact Craters on Mars
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. G. Jeffrey Taylor

Gordon Clendenen
Use of Remote Sensing and Computer Generated Animation to Provide Dynamic Visualization of Tropical Environment Climatic Data
Environmental Studies
Mentor: Dr. K. W. Bridges

Josette Germano and Lori-ann Takizawa
An Image Oriented, Lunar Spectral Database
Business/Finance major and Secondary Education major
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Lisa Hashimoto
Modeling Human Limb Movements: Implications for Design of Equipment and Environment Systems
Department of Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Max Vercruyssen

Vanesa Murray
Arousal and Cognitive Function: Operator Posture Considerations for Workstation Designs
Center on Aging and Department of Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Max Vercruyssen

Dana Nakashima
Manipulation of Biological Systems to Enhance Anhydrobiotic Survival and Achieve Suspended Animation
Department of Zoology
Mentor: Dr. Christopher Womersley

Jennifer Parker
A Remote Sensing Study of Karthala Volcano, W. Indian Ocean
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

Lori-ann Takizawa and Josette Germano
An Image Oriented, Lunar Spectral Database
Secondary Education major and Business/Finance major
Mentor: Dr. Paul Lucey (HIGP)

Steven E. Valin
The Noninvasive Determination of Regional Body Fluid Dynamics in Microgravity: A Design Based on Impedance Measurement Techniques
Department of Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Frank Koide

Cynthia A. Wilburn
Analysis of a Multispectral Scanner Time Series of the Northern Caspian Sea: Determining the Effects of Rapid Sea-level Rise
Department of Geology and Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Derek A. Yamamoto
A Study of Surface Deterioration of Airfield Runways for Space Vehicles
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Mentor: Dr. W. Pong

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Normand Dionne
A Chaotic Impact Oscillator Model for Pulsating Variable Stars
Department of Physics
Mentor: Dr. Richard Crowe

Lois Sanekane
Navigational Techniques of the Past and Present
Department of Biology
Mentor: Dr. Marlene Hapai

Tim Stimple
Astronomical Image Processing
Department of Natural Science
Mentor: Dr. John Gathright

Erin Thompson
Demonstration Spectroscope and Research Survey Spectrograph
Department of Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Wayne Wack
Photometric and CCD Investigation of Asteroid Geometry
Department of Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. William Hartmann (Planetary Sciences Institute)

Fall 1991
Fall 1991 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1991 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Omar Abing
SPACE: School Projects for Astronomy in Space Electronics
Department of Education
Mentors: Dr. Lawrence Zane and Dr. Frank Pottenger

Wanda Ah Chan
Hawaiian Archeology from Space
Anthropology/ Hawaiian Studies
Mentor: Dr. Terry Hunt

Charlotte Albert-Thenet
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Psychology
Mentor: Dr. Robert Cole

Karen Balabis
MSS of the Caspian Sea
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Alexandra Cheng
Modeling of Viscosities of Magmatic Silicate Liquids
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Sieger van der Laan

Robert Contreras
Stellar Formation
Math/Physics
Mentor: Dr. David Saunders

Kris Hamada
Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Edward DeLuca

Joy Ishigo
Teleprospector Feasibility Study
Electrical Engineering
Mentor: Dr. Joel Fox (Mechanical Engineering)

Paul Johnson
High Pressure Fractionation of Kolekole Volcanics, Oahu: A Terrestrial Analog of Magmatic Processes and Planetary Interiors
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. John Sinton

Park McGraw
Improving the Efficiency of Astronomical Spectrographs
Physics
Mentor: Dr. Alan Stockton

Lauri Saiki
Computer Simulations of Atom Hopping in Solid H2
Physics
Mentor: Dr. James Gaines

Karen Sender
Comparison of Continental and Oceanic Rifting Using Spaceborne and Marine Remote Sensing Techniques
Geology/Geophysics
Mentors: Dr. Brian Taylor and Dr. Fernando Martinez

Michelle Tatsumura
Magellan at Venus
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

Cynthia Wilburn
Analysis of a MSS Time Series of the N. Caspian Sea, USSR: Determining the Effects of Rapid Sea-level Rise
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Charles Fletcher

Christina Xavier
Developing a Teaching Curriculum on Marine Applications of Satellite and Airborne Remote Sensing
Biology
Mentor: Dr. Sherwood Maynard

Philip Yogi
The Dynamics of the 1991 Mr. Pinatubo Eruption Cloud as Seen From Weather Satellites
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Steven Self

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

William Blackston
Quadratic Dynamics of Nonlinear Orbits
Math/Physics
Mentor: Dr. Arthur Sagle

Normand Dionne
A Chaotic Impact Oscillator Model for Pulsating Variable Stars
Computer Science/Math
Mentor: Dr. James Walker and Dr. Richard Crowe

Jon Hayashi
Panoramic CCD Imaging with the 24" Telescopes
Physics
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Darrell Howard
Design and Construction of Cassegrain Adaptor for a CCD Camera on the 24" Telescope
Physics/Math
Mentor: Dr. Robert Fox

Tim Stimple
Hawaii Space Industry Career Planning
Computer Science
Mentor: Dr. April Komenaka

Fall 1990
Fall 1990 Undergraduate Participants

Fall 1990 Undergraduate Fellowships

University of Hawai'i at Manoa:

Karen Balabis
Valley Network Channels on Mars
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Craig Glenn

Scott Moncrief
Remote Sensing Hawaiian Lava Flows with Thermal Infrared Images
Geology/Geophysics
Mentor: Dr. Scott Rowland

 

University of Hawai'i at Hilo:

Donald Burciaga
Space Education and the Outer Islands
Psychology/Speech Communication
Mentor: Dr. Paul Dixon

John Gathright
Search for Non-stellar Objects in Eclipsing Binary Systems
Physics
Mentor: Dr. William Heacox

Thomas Ihsle
Expert System to Identify Heavenly Bodies
Biology
Mentor: Dr. Lani Stemmermann

Daniel Vaughn
Hydrogeologic Development of Mars
Geology/Biology
Mentor: Dr. James Anderson

Donald Yancey
Ultraviolet Radiation Tolerance of Microorganisms on Top of Mauna Kea
Premedicine
Mentor: Dr. Fred Stone (Biology)