Through The Excitement of Space HSFL Launch
HSGC Title with Logo

HSGC is a wide-ranging community educational program supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that promotes studies in scientific and technical fields related to space. These fields are broad and include astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, physics, remote sensing, and space science.

Chartered under the NASA National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium began its activities in the fall of 1990. NASA National Space Grant College and Fellowship programs are dedicated to the development and support of future scientists and engineers. Participation in Space Grant programs provides new opportunities for our full-time UH-system students to explore space- and aeronautical-related fields. Expanded opportunities for space education through the efforts of the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium also extend to teachers of students in kindergarten through the twelfth grade.

Learn more about HSGC's Programs.
HSGC Programs

What do we do?

Research

The research programs of the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium emphasize planetary geology, extraterrestrial materials, astronomy, and remote sensing at the secondary, undergraduate, and graduate levels. The University of Hawai‘i participation in numerous NASA missions, use of telescopes atop Maunakea on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, and community college telescope facilities allow for detailed observations and research of meteorites and the planets, including Earth.

 

Remote Sensing

Hawai‘i Space Grant's Remote Sensing Program includes research, education, and applications. We are expanding our undergraduate curriculum at the Mānoa, Windward, and Maui campuses, with emphasis on remote sensing of planet Earth. Plans are also underway to work with local industry to use remote sensing in environmental studies. Our research program is well established and internationally recognized.

 

K-12 Education

The educational programs, projects, and resources created or supported by the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium are designed for teachers, librarians, and students, and are aligned with Hawai‘i State and National Educational Goals and Standards for Science, Technology, Math, and Geography. Our on-going development of hands-on activities for science inquiry and understanding adds to the variety and depth of topics presented and shared. With an extensive array of K-12 programs including family science nights, summer science camps, community science days and support and leadership in scholastic robotics programs statewide, the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium supports the work force development pipeline in STEM-G.

 

Public Outreach

Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium members are involved in a variety of projects to increase public awareness, understanding, and support of NASA programs in space and planetary sciences and aeronautics. We have presented aerospace exhibitions at Windward Community College and Windward Mall, astronomy demonstrations and public observing nights at Leeward Community College, and Space Days at Honolulu Community College. Space Grant personnel also join with other planetary geoscientists at U. H. Mānoa to hold biannual open houses for the community. These open houses are popular excursions for school groups on Oahu. Visitors learn about astronomy, planetary exploration, meteorites, observing Earth from space, and more through lectures, displays, demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Further outreach lectures, open-house presentations, displays, classroom visits, Future Flight Hawai‘i exhibitions and programs, our educational PSRD science magazine, and Space Grant web pages are coordinated from the U. H. Mānoa campus. See our News page for more.

 

External Relations

Space Grant expertise in remote sensing has been shared with local state officials and residents to increase the utilization of remote sensing data. Hawai‘i Space Grant also is working with NASA's Mission to Planet Earth to develop educational outreach and enhancement grants using remote sensing data. These projects are coordinated from the U. H. Mānoa campus.

 

Hawai‘i EPSCoR

The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (known as EPSCoR) establishes partnerships with government, higher education and industry that are designed to effect lasting improvements in a state's or region's research infrastructure, R&D capacity and hence, its national R&D competitiveness.

The goal of EPSCoR is to provide seed funding that will enable jurisdictions to develop an academic research enterprise directed toward long-term, self-sustaining, nationally-competitive capabilities in aerospace and aerospace-related research. Five federal agencies conduct EPSCoR programs, including NASA. Hawai‘i is a proud participant in the NASA EPSCoR.

Additional Information [External links open in new windows]

NASA EPSCoR home page 

NASA EPSCoR Stimuli 2017-2018 Report (This 138-page pdf is a summary collection of college and university basic research and technology development reports in alignment with the NASA Technology Roadmaps.)

Facilitate: Partnerships between schools, government, and private sector

Administer: Help to run existing programs.

Catalyze: Serve as the catalyst for new partnerships between private agency sponsors and education projects or for new joint research and education projects between industry and the University faculty.

Educate: Continue to directly support and organize NASA educational efforts for all levels of public learning.

  • Strengthen the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics education focus with the
  • HiSTEM Pipeline
  • Develop links to Hawai‘i High Tech businesses
  • Support active affiliate Community College involvement
  • Establish interdepartmental links
  • Increase opportunities for women and minorities
  • Stretch workforce support
  One objective of the Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium in accordance with NASA's educational objectives is to build and maintain an educational pipeline that includes provisions for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium has developed the HiSTEM program with strong educational pipelines to propel the technical learning experiences from elementary school to Master's level postgraduate degrees. The HiSTEM pipeline consists of three branches in the areas of Space Science, Engineering, and Remote Sensing that offer activities from K-12 to undergraduate to graduate level. We recognize the need to engage student interest in STEM disciplies at a young age and the HiSTEM pipeline is designed to provide hands-on interactive and engaging programs at every level of education.
Affiliates Map

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges (Hawai‘i, Honolulu, Kapi‘olani, Kaua‘i, Leeward, Maui, and Windward) spread over the four main Hawaiian islands. A significant goal of the program is to encourage interdisciplinary studies and research and to train future generations of space scientists and engineers.

The Hawai‘i Space Grant Consortium is administered at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in the Hawai‘i Insitute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology.

Meet the team
Luke Flynn

Luke Flynn

Director

Email: 

flynn@higp.hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s): 

(808) 956-3154 (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 501D

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Marcia Rei Nii

Marcia Rei Nii

Program Coordinator

Email: 

mars@higp.hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s): 

(808) 956-3139 (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 501A

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Frances Zhu

Frances Zhu

Email: 

zhu@higp.hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s): 

(808) 956-5738,  (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 524B

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Peter A. J. Englert

Peter A. J. Englert

Associate Director for Internships & Space Science

Email:
penglert@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 956-3955

Fax: (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 508B

 

 

Address

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

TBD

TBD

Associate Director

Associate director TBD

 

Dr. Jung Park

Dr. Jung Park

Associate Director at Maui Community College

Email:
parkjung@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 984-3423

Fax: (808) 984-3869

 

Office:

Maui Community College

Electronics & Mathematics, ‘Ike Le’a 143

Kahului, HI 96732

Dr. Joseph Wilcox

Dr. Joseph Wilcox

Associate Director at Hawai'i Community College

Email:
kaikea350@msn.com

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 322-4969

Fax: (808) 322-4855

 

Office:

Hawai’i Community College

UH Center West Hawai’i

81-96 Haleki’i Street B-1

Kealakekua, HI 96750

Dr. Shidong Kan

Dr. Shidong Kan

Associate Director at Honolulu Community College

Email:
shidong.kan@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone:

(808) 845-9499

 

Office:

Honolulu Community College

874 Dillingham Blvd., Physics, 72A-100

Honolulu, HI 96817

Helen Rapozo

Helen Rapozo

Project IMUA Mentor / Honolulu Community College Liaison

Email:
rapozo@hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 322-4855

 

Office:

874 Dillingham Blvd., ITS, 7-305A

Honolulu, HI 96817

Radovan Milincic

Radovan Milincic

Associate Director at Kapi'olani Comunity College

Email:
milincic@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 734-9265

Fax: (808) 734-9151

 

 

Address:

Kapi’olani Community College

4303 Diamond Head Road, Kokio 214

Honolulu, HI 96816

Aaron Hanai

Aaron Hanai

Kapi'olani Community College Liaison

Email:
aaron.hanai@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 734-9433

Fax: (808) 734-9151

 

 

Address:

4303 Diamond Head Road, Math & Sci, Kokio 202D

Honolulu, HI 96816

Dr. Georgeanne Purvinis

Dr. Georgeanne Purvinis

Associate Director at Kauai Community College

Email: 

purvinis@hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 245-8219

Fax: (808) 245-8220

 

Office:

Kaua’i Community College

Daniel K. Inouye Technology Center

3- 1901 Kaumuali’i Highway,

Lihue, HI 96766

 

Dr. Bryson Padasdao

Dr. Bryson Padasdao

Associate Director at Leeward Community College

Email:

brysonep@hawaii.edu

 

Telephone:

(808) 455-0251

Fax: (808) 455-0509

 

Office:
Leeward Community College
Mathematics and Natural Sciences, BS 106A
96-045 Ala ‘Ike
Pearl City, HI 96782

Joseph Ciotti

Joseph Ciotti

Associate Director at Windward Community College

Email:
ciotti@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 236-9111

Fax: (808) 455-0509

 

 

Office:

Windward Community College

Physical Science, Hale Imiloa 134

45-720 Kea’ahala Road

Kaneohe, HI 96744

Jake Hudson

Jake Hudson

Rocketry Coordinator / CanSat Liaison at Windward Community College

Email:
jacobh@hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone:

(808) 236-9112
Fax: (808) 247-5362

 

 

Office:

Aerospace Education Lab (WCC)

Physical Science, Hale Imiloa 112

45-720 Kea’ahala Road

Kaneohe, HI

Dr. Romina King

Dr. Romina King

Associate Director at the University of Guam

Email:
roking@triton.uog.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(671) 984-3423

Fax: (671) 984-3869

 

Office:

University of Guam

Office of Graduate Studies, Sponsored Programs & Research

Center for Island Sustainability

Dean Circle house 32, UOG Station

Mangilao, Guam (USA) 96924

Dora Nakafuji

Dora Nakafuji

Academic Affiliate

Academic Affiliate, Strategy and Innovation, Kamehameha Schools

Background interview

 

Email:

donakafu@ksbe.edu

 

Telephone:

(808) 534-8639

Amber Imai-Hong

Amber Imai-Hong

HSGC / HSFL Outreach & Engineering Specialist

Email:
amber@higp.hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 956-3138
Fax : (808) 956-6322

 

 

Office:

POST 518 (Hawai’i Space Flight Laboratory)

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 501
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Art and Rene Kimura

Art and Rene Kimura

Education Specialists

Address:
P.O. Box 6412
Hilo, Hawai`i 96720

Email:
Art Kimura: art@higp.hawaii.edu
Rene Kimura: rene@higp.hawaii.edu

Phone:
(808) 934-7261

Linda Martel

Linda Martel

Planetary Science Research Division Communications / Webmaster

Email:
linda@higp.hawaii.edu

 

 

Telephone(s):

(808) 956-9237
Fax : (808) 956-6322

 

 

Office:

POST 502

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 501
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Alex Meneses

Alex Meneses

Student Assistant

Email:

ameneses@higp.hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s): 

(808) 956-3138 (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 501

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Christine Uehara

Christine Uehara

Student Assistant

Email:

cyuehara@higp.hawaii.edu

 

Telephone(s): 

(808) 956-3138 (808) 956-6322

 

Office:

POST 501

 

 

Address:

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

History Title
National Space Grant History Title.
NASA Logo Resized
Space Grant

The Space Grant Program will be NASA's agent for change, coordination, and cooperation in technical education, the enhancement of research infrastructure, and in the promotion and inspiration of lifelong learning of math, science, engineering and technology.

"Congress enacted the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Act on October 30, 1987. The Act is a new commitment by Congress to higher education. Congress expects that the participating universities and NASA will cooperate under this Act to extend the benefits the nation obtains from its broad range of aerospace activities. In analogy to the Land and Sea Grant programs, Congress anticipates that Space Grant universities, their affiliates, and NASA will conceive new ideas, seed future growth, both on and off the Earth, cultivate and nurture opportunities for citizens through technology transfer, then guide them toward new ventures, educating them to function in a society burgeoning with engineering and scientific innovations." . . .

Learn more about the National Space Grant Program's History.
History of the National Space Grant Program

From Mission to America, Report of the National Council of Space Grant Directors, The Woods Hole Workshop, August 24-28,1992.)

"In 1958, Congress passed the National Space Act. That act transformed the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and firmly committed the United States to the exploration and exploitation of space for future benefit. NASA maintains major research, development, demonstration, and operation programs in aeronautics, manned and unmanned space flight, space commercialization, and advanced technologies. NASA has conducted unmanned missions to all but one of the planets of our solar system. It has established major observatories in space for continued studies of the Earth, our solar system, and the distant universe. NASA vehicles regularly fly people to and from orbit. By the year 2000, Americans will reside permanently in orbit about Earth. Furthermore, the President has committed the nation to establishing a permanent moonbase and eventually sending people to Mars."

"NASA is a small, critically necessary, part of the larger field of American aerospace industries and services, frequently considered the hallmark of U.S. world technological, economic, and scientific leadership. Aerospace industries and services enable rapid travel across the United States and tightly link the nation to the rest of the world. NASA programs serve the national security. NASA's research and development capabilities contribute to the economic health of the nation by sponsoring scientific research and creating new technology. With its experimental missions, with its creative methods of transferring technology to public uses, and with its unique complements of university and industrial affiliates, NASA has long been perceived as a farsighted agent in advancing the education of Americans."

"Congress enacted the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Act on October 30, 1987. The Act is a new commitment by Congress to higher education. Congress expects that the participating universities and NASA will cooperate under this Act to extend the benefits the nation obtains from its broad range of aerospace activities. In analogy to the Land and Sea Grant programs, Congress anticipates that Space Grant universities, their affiliates, and NASA will conceive new ideas, seed future growth, both on and off the Earth, cultivate and nurture opportunities for citizens through technology transfer, then guide them toward new ventures, educating them to function in a society burgeoning with engineering and scientific innovations." . . .

The National Space Grant Program has been modeled after the National Land Grant [the Morrill Act of 1862] and the National Sea Grant university programs [1966)]. "The Space Grant Program concept was introduced by Senator Lloyd Bentsen in 1986 as Senate Bill 2098. In congressional testimony introducing the legislation, Senator Bensten stated, 'Space Grant Program's research and development effort would be directed toward national ends for space technology and commercialization.'" In the actual legislation, Congress found that "research and development of space science, space technology, and space commercialization contributed to the enhancement of commerce." Further, Congress found that "development of space frontiers requires a broad commitment and partnership between Federal government, states, private industry, and universities concerned with utilization of space. The intent of the legislation was to use existing schools and encourage interdisciplinary consortia of universities and industry. Senator Bentsen proposed that grants be 'awarded on a competitive basis to applicants who propose the most cost-effective programs for the development and utilization of space resources.' In his congressional remarks, Senator Bentsen stated that the Space Grant fellowship program would be established for education and training assistance at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In the enacting legislation, Congress found that NASA 'will provide the needs for promotion of activities in the program that will result in greater understanding, assessment, development, and utilization of space.'" (The Woods Hole Report).

"Congress expected to encourage the following activity from its enabling legislation:

• Promote a strong educational base, obtain responsive research and training, and achieve broad dissemination of knowledge and techniques.

• Utilize universities to support exploration and development of resources and opportunities afforded by the space environment.

• Encourage and support multidisciplinary programs of space research within the university community.

• Engage in integrated activities of training, research, and public service.

• Conduct cooperative programs with industry.

• Coordinate the Space Grant Program with the overall program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

• Encourage and support consortia comprised of university and industry members to advance the exploration and development of space resources.

• Encourage and support Federal funding for graduate fellowships in fields related to space.

• Support activities in colleges and universities generally for the purposes of creating and operating a network of institutional programs that will enhance achievements resulting from efforts under the program." (The Woods Hole Report).

Fifty-two Space Grant consortia now work individually toward these purposes in every state, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Directors of the statewide consortia formed the National Councils of Space Grant Directors to satisfy Congress's mandate for a national network. The Council enables the fifty-two directors to work with NASA in constructing a national network.

From: ISSO -- Institute for Space Systems Operations, 1992-1993 Annual Report.